See for yourself what some newspapers wrote about us over the past 50 years.

273 August 9, 2015
The Louisiana Courier - A Busy Summer Continues
272 May, 2015
Indianapolis Monthly - The City's Best Specialty Markets
271 November, 2014
Country Living Magazine - Antique Finds and What they are worth
270 Fall, 2014
IGHS - Hoosier German-American of the Year
269 August 17, 2014
Indystar.com - Test Your Neighborhood Knowledge
268 August 7, 2014
Sertoma Club - Heidelberg sweetens the deal
267 July 3, 2014
Sertoma Club of East Indianapolis
266 Summer, 2014
IGHS - JJ Named Sagamore of the Wabash
265 March 20, 2014
IndyStar.com - 25 things to love about Indy's Eastside
264 March 07, 2014
The White House - Thank You
263 Dec. 14, 2013
BADISCHE NEUESTE NACHRICHTEN - Badische Springerle
262 Dec. 4, 2013 The City of Indianapolis- 45th Anniversary
261 Dec. 2, 2013
The City of Lawrence - Proclamation
260 Nov. 27, 2013
United States Senate - Thank You for 50 Years
259 Nov. 17, 2013
The Indianapolis Star - Leaders Look to transform Pendleton Pike
258 Oct. 11, 2013
The Indianapolis Star - Local Chefs Rack up the Awards
257 Sept. 24, 2013
Indiana Restaurant Ass. - Indiana Chefs Hall of Fame
256 May 30, 2013
The Indianapolis Star - Places that feel like home
255 May 10, 2013
The Indianapolis Star - For a true taste of Indy
254 Dec. 21, 2012 The Indianapolis Star - Gourmet Gifts
253 Dec. 13, 2012 The Indianapolis Star - Christmas Treats
252 Nov 19, 2012 PBS-WTIU - The Weekly Special
251 Oct. 27, 2012 The Indianapolis Star - Lawrence City
250 Oct. 12, 2012 The Indianapolis Star - Taste Tidbits
249 Sep. 12, 2012 State of Indiana - Distinguished Hoosier Indiana Award
248 June 1, 2012 The Indianapolis Star - Taste Indy Living
247 Dec. 11, 2011 Terre Haute Tribune - Star Valley Life Garden Gnomes
246 Dec. 1, 2011 Indianapolis Monthly - Indianapolis Fun Finds
245 Aug. 05-21, 2011 Indiana State Fair - State Fair German Exhibition
244 Apr. 22, 2011 The Indianapolis Star - Dankeschoen for Restauration
243 Mar. 17, 2011 The Indianapolis Star - Heidelberg Fire
242 Mar. 15, 2011 The Indianapolis Star - Bake Shop Fire
241 Feb. 5, 2011 Discovery Channel - "Road Eats" Pilot Filming at Bakery/TV Show
240 Mar. 9, 2010 HelloIndianapolis.com - Pendleton Pike Road Finish
239 Nov. 17, 2009 The Indianapolis Star - A Sweet Life of J.J.
238 January 2009 Sunrise Cookbook - WTHR - Heidelberg Haus
237 January 2009 Indianapolis Dine - A Sweet Life
236 Dec. 19, 2008 NPR - National Public Radio - WPR Nationwide Radio Interview
235 Dec. 10, 2008 The Indianapolis Star - Springerle & Pfeffernuesse
234 June 30, 2008 Nuvo Cityguides - Neighborhood Guide Visit Northeast Lawrence
233 March 2008 Indianapolis Women - Family Time at Heidelberg
232 Dec. 8, 2008 Lawrence Township Council Proclamation
231 March 5, 2008 Lawrence Twonship - City Council Citizen Award Ceremony
230 2008 Treasures of Indiana 2008 Coffee Table Book 2008
229 Dec. 19, 2007 Indianapolis Star - Public Radio Interview
228 Dec. 11, 2007 Indianapolis Monthly - Springerle Has Sprung
227 Nov. 28, 2007 The Indianapolis Star - Spring for Springerle
226 October 28, 2007
Indianapolis Star - Governor's Tax Plan
225 Aug. 2, 2007 Indianapolis Intake Magazine - Break out your Lederhosen
224 April 5, 2007 Indianapolis Intake/Insight Weekly Magazine - Welcome Gnomes
223 Jan. 5, 2007 The Indianapolis Star - Go!
222 2007 Indiana Curiosities Book - Famous Heidelberg Haus
221 Dec. 22, 2006 NPR - National Public Radio - WPR National Public Radio Show
220 Dec. 6, 2006 Herald Times Online - Bloomington
219 Nov. 27, 2006 The Indianapolis Star - Stolen Wedding Picture Book
218 Nov. 24, 2006 The Indianapolis Star - Sweets Plus
217 Oct. 4, 2006 The Indianapolis Star - Stein way German Beer Steins
216 March 16, 2006 Intake Magazine - Indy most fave restaurants
215 March 2, 2006 Intake Magazine - Heidelberg Haus Description
214 2006 Reid Duffy's Guide to Indiana's Favorite Restaurants Updated Edition
213 Aug. 26, 2005 Indianapolis Herald Weekly - Dining at Pendleton Pike
212 May, 2005 Indianapolis Monthly - Cheap Eats
211 March 28, 2005 Indianapolis Star - A World of Treats
210 March 1, 2005 Indianapolis Star - Toddler's Food play Kinder Bueno
209 Feb. 2, 2005 Neue Presse - Heidelberg in Foodnetwork
208 Jan. 22, 2005 Nordamerikanische Wochen Post - Famous Heidelberg Haus
207 Jan. 2005 Badische Neueste Nachrichten Karlsruher - Konditor macht Karriere
206 Oct. 13-20, 2004 Nuvo Indy - Best German Restaurant
205 Sep. 2-8, 2004 Intake Magazine - Authentic German Treats
204 Oct. 9, 2003 The Jackson County Banner - Dining the Wright Way
203 Oct. 2003 Indianapolis Monthly - Where to find the Best
202 Sep. 25, 2003 Indianapolis Topics - Lawrence celebrates Germanfest
201 Aug. 2003 Indianapolis Monthly #5 - Cafe Heidelberg - 25 Fabulous Food Finds
200 April 17, 2003 Indianapolis Topics - Biz Buzz Hot Dog House
199 Jan. 7, 2003 The Indianapolis Star - Vietnam Veterans meet at Heidelberg
198 Feb. 2002 Indianapolis Monthly - Best Carryout Meal in Indianapolis
197 Oct. 2001 Indianapolis Monthly - Kaffeklatsch und Kitsch
196 March 24, 2001 Retailer's Baker Association - Bakery Fantasyland
195 Feb. 23, 2001 The Indianapolis Star - Heidelberg brings Germany to Indiana
194 Feb. 12, 2001 Bakery Online - Fantasyland of Gifts
193 Winter 2000 Learning Languages - German Videos for the U.S.A.
192 Winter 2000 Greater Indianapolis - Chef J.J. makes Kaiserschmarrn
191 June 22, 2000 The Indianapolis Star - Flavors of the World
190 1999 Neue Presse Los Angeles, California - JJ - the Happy Baker
189 Feb. 12, 1999 CUB Reporter - Diving into delicious Deutsch dining
188 Oct. 30, 1998 Washington Journal DC - Ein bisschen Heimat in Indianapolis
187 Oct. 11, 1998 German-USA Magazine - Notes of an Outlander
186 Oct. 1-8, 1998 Nuvo Newsweekly - Guten Tag Y'all from the Heidelberg
185 May 9, 1998 Amerika Woche, Chicago IL - Mehr als nur ein Geschaeft
184 Feb. 26, 1997 The Indianapolis Star - A Taste of the Old World
183 Dec. 6, 1996 Washington Journal DC - Octoberfest Display at Tash Mahal
182 June 24, 1996 Key to City of Lawrence From the Mayor's Office
181 March 6, 1996 Lawrence Township Journal - 860 Kindergartners at the Heidelberg
180 Nov. 17, 1995 North Star - Back to the German Culture
179 May 1995 Indianapolis Monthly - Exotic Tastes
178 April 18, 1995 The Final Cut - Military likes Heidelberg Haus
177 Feb. 8, 1995 Lawrence Times - Flour Children
176 March 1-2, 1994 Lawrence Township Journal - 800 kids learn how to bake
175 March 1994 Bakery and Deli-Line - Retailer of the Month
174 Feb. 17, 1994 The Indianapolis Star - Kids having fun baking
173 Dec. 29, 1993 Lawrence Township Journal - Celebrates 25th Anniversary
172 July 13-14, 1993 Lawrence Journal - J.J. wins best oldtimer 4th of July Award
171 Feb. 5, 1992 Lawrence Journal - Family honored at Lawrence School Board
170 Jan. 13-17, 1992 Video Store - America's First All German Video Store Opens
169 Dec. 1, 1991 Indianapolis Monthly - Best Pastry Counter of '91
168 Aug. 8, 1991 The Indianapolis Star - Claudia Schiffer likes German Chocolate
167 July 26, 1991 Abendpost Deutsche Zeitung - A Great Place to Visit
166 June 28, 1991 The Indianapolis Star - Good German food and oh, those pastries
165 Feb. 6, 1991 The Lawrence Times - Savor German Food
164 Dec. 24, 1990 German Christmas Music on Radio - J.J. the DJ plays German music
163 Nov. 23, 1990 Indianapolis Star - 1400 German Classics available on Videos
162 Oct. 4, 1990 Indianapolis Star, - Memories cloud news The Wall is coming down
161 Dec. 12, 1989 Washington Courier - Heidelberg Haus expands
160 December 6, 1989 Lawrence Journal - New Heidelberg addition is big success
159 Nov. 11, 1989 Indianapolis Star - Heidelberg customers cheer fall of Berlin Wall
158 October 29, 1989 Badische Neueste Nachrichten - Was man so hoert
157 June 1, 1989 Safety Belt Connection - #4 Heidelberg Street Sign "Buckle Up"
156 Sept. 30, 1988 Weekly Reader National - Let's Make Cookies Heidelberg
155 July 7, 1988 Perry Township Weekly - Heidelberg brings out the German in you
154 June 6, 1988 Logansport Sentinal - Cookies and Children Make Inseparable Pair
153 June-July 1988 Lawrence Chamber of Commerce - Business Profile of Heidelberg
152 June 1, 1988 Indianapolis Star -Kindergarteners learn fine art of cookie-making
151 June 1988 Welcome to Lawrence - Indiana City Map of Lawrence
150 April 27, 1988 Lawrence Journal - Field Trips for 800 kids to the Heidelberg Bakery
149 Nov. 25, 1987 Lawrence Journal - J.J. demonstrates how to make cakes
148 Nov. 24, 1987 Indianapolis AD-Courier - Cooking class gets chef's advise
147 July 8, 1987 Lawrence Journal - The Jungbauer's in their 1916 Olds on Parade
146 November 1, 1986 Midwest Bakers Association - MBA Member on TV again
145 October 25, 1986 The Indianapolis Star - Heidelberg House at International Fest
144 October 10, 1986 Midwest Bakers Association - MBA Member on TV again
143 Sept. 21, 1986 The Indianapolis Star - Jim Gerard TV Show
142 August 25, 1986 Indianapolis Star - German Culture preserved for the young
141 May 1986 Indianapolis Monthly - International restaurants in Indianapolis
140 February 12, 1986 The Indianapolis Star - 220 Kids at field trip to learn to bake
139 February 11, 1986 The Lawrence AD-Courier - Kids have fun baking
138 May 24, 1985 The Lawrence Township Journal - Bandids invade Heidelberg Cafe
137 February 1984 Indianapolis Magazine - Best coffee in Indianapolis
136 Dec. 14, 1983 Lawrence Township Journal
135 Dec. 12, 1983 The Lawrence Courier Journal - 15th Anniversary of Bakery
134 March 22, 1982 The Indianapolis Times - Dancing at St. Benno Fest
133 Dec. 24, 1981 Indianapolis News - World biggest beersteins
132 Dec. 16, 1981 The Lawrence Township Journal - Prosit, German beer tastes so good
131 Sept. 7, 1981 Indianapolis Business Journals - Our Mural Artist Rainbow Story
130 Sept. 2, 1981 Lawrence Township Journal - Tanya Jungbauer gives some advise to the artist
129 July 23, 1980 Lawrence Township Journal - Band plays in front of Heidelberg
128 June 14-21, 1980 The News - Free Time Midsummer Festival food booth
127 March 1980 Indianapolis Home - Kaffeklatsch at the Heidelberg
126 January 1980 Indianapolis Monthly - Best of Indianapolis
125 October 17, 1979 The Lawrence Township Journal - Four generations
124 September 15, 1979 Indiana's Baker Association - Pastry demonstration
123 August 29, 1979 The Lawrence Township Journal - Die Schultuete - First Day of School
122 July 18, 1979 The Lawrence Township Journal - Billyjohn Rainbow - Mural artist at work
121 July 14, 1979 Midwest Bakers Association - News and Briefs
120 June 18, 1979 Indianapolis News - Midsummer Festival food booth
119 Spring 1979 Celebrity Recipes Book - J.J. shares some of his recipes
118 July 1978 Indiana Bakers Association - Story of the Heidelberg Bakery and Gift Shop
117 June 1978 Indiana Bakers Association Magazine - Old-time Bakery Museum now open at Heidelberg Cafe
116 Spring 1978 The Travel Journal - A visit to the Bakery Museum
115 Nov. 26 - Dec. 3, 1977 The News Traveler's Guide to great restaurants
114 November 17, 1977 Indianapolis News - Where To Eat That's A Treat
113 June 1977 Where to eat in America - Heidelberg included in famous guide
112 December 18, 1976 Konditorei und Cafe - (Freundschaft Mrs. Behme) Anzeige brachte Springerle collectors zusammen
111 October 17, 1976 Indianapolis Star - Museum is a restored 1906 bake shop
110 October 14, 1976 The Lawrence TWP Journal - Cafe features new Bakery Museum
109 July 29, 1976 The Lawrence Township Journal - Corina Jungbauer tops big 4th of July cake
108 July 1976 Baker Boys News - Success for young German pastry chef
107 February 18, 1976 The Lawrence Topics - Mayor's birthday cake big hit
106 January 1976 Midwest Bakers Association - Old bakery wanted for museum
105 December 1975 Tageblatt Goettingen - Freundschaft ueber den grossen Teich
104 October 8, 1975 The Indianapolis News - Chef Tries to Preserve Art
103 April 24, 1975 The Indianapolis Star - Murat Shrine pastry demonstration
102 April 16, 1975 The Indianapolis Star - Chefs to Display Expertise
101 December 2, 1974 Commonwealth of Kentucky - Kentucky Colonel Certificate for J.J.
100 July 11, 1974 Baker Boy News - Antiques wanted
99 June 1974 Badische Neueste Nachrichten, Karlsruhe - Was man so hoert
98 December 29, 1973 The Indianapolis Star - Wedding cake at the Auto Show
97 August 15, 1973 Badische Neueste Nachrichten, Germany - Der Postsack - The Mail Bag
96 February 23, 1973 The Indianapolis Star - J.J. bakes cake for 1800 for Governor
95 December 1972 Exposition Magazine - Christmas at the Heidelberg
94 June 15, 1972 The Lawrence Journal - Award winning pastries by Master Chef
93 April 1972 The Hoosier Farmer - International Pastry Chef Creates Gourmet Treats
92 March 17, 1972 Indiana University - Purdue University - Gourmet Pastry Baking class at IUPUI
91 February 5, 1972 Konditorei und Cafe - Ein Konditor in Amerika
90 December 9, 1971 Badische Neueste Nachrichten - Ein Karlsruher blieb drueben
89 August 12, 1971 Suburban and Lawrence Journal - Jungbauer is Old Country Pastry Chef
88 May 1971 Badische Neueste Nachrichten
87 May 10, 1971 Indianapolis Power & Light News - UMMM GOOD! J.J. judging baking contest
86 April 28, 1971 Scottish Rite - Indianapolis Juergen performes pastry baking at Scottish Rite
85 April 20, 1971 Fort Wayne News-Sentinel - Jungbauer back in Fort Wayne again
84 March 22, 1971 Muncie Evening Press - Indianapolis Pastry Chef comes to Muncie
83 February 30, 1970 Indianapolis Star - JJ Overwhelms
82 November 19, 1970 Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette - Pastry Pizazz German Pastry Chef at Ft. Wayne Art Institute
81 November 18, 1970 Fort Wayne News-Sentinel - Mouths Drools at J.J.'s Pastries
80 November 13, 1970 Fort Wayne News-Sentinel - Decorative To Taste Pastries
79 October 16, 1970 Banner Greencastle - , Indiana Baker entertains 220 extension homemakers
78 October 2, 1970 Greencastle, Indiana - Prize-Winning Pastry Chef Featured
77 October 1970 Fort Wayne Campus Purdue University - Gourmet Cooking 6 weeks
76 September 23, 1070 The Indianapolis Star - Midwest Food Exhibition Indiana State Fair
75 August 29 1970 Indianapolis State Fair - Inside Outside of Party Cakes
74 August 20, 1970 Hanckock Journal
73 August 15, 1970 Konditorei und Cafe, German Trade Magazine - Ein deutscher Konditor in den USA
72 August 9, 1970 The Indianapolis Star
71 January 1970 Columbus Republic - JJ' Overwhelms with Skill, Calories
70 May 7, 1970 The Speedway Flyer Journal - Gourmet Pastry Class at IUPUI
69 May 1970 Indiana University - Purdue Polis - Decorative Pastry Preparation
68 April 23, 1970 The Suburban Journal - Jungbauer To Teach Pastry Course
67 April 6, 1970 The Indianapolis News - Don't Quote Me
66 Spring, 1970
IUPUI - Gourmet Pastry Preperation
65 March 5, 1970 Indianapolis Star - Tastry Tryout - Pretzel Preview
64 February 30, 1970 The Indianapolis Star - Decorative to Taste, Talk By Chef Jurgen
63 February 5, 1970 The Suburban Lawrence Journal - Attractive German costumes worn at Cafe
62 January 10, 1970 The Indianapolis Star - Citizens Gas sponsored Gala Dinner
61 January 1970 Fort Wayne Sentinel - Pastry Pizazz' Seen At Decorative Living
60 1970 Columbus Republic
59 1970 The Indianapolis Star News
58 October 5, 1969 The Indianapolis Star - (Dinner Dances Buf) City Market Dinner Dance
57 October 4, 1969 To Market To Market Ball Large pastry display at Cultural Event
56 July - August 1969 Northern Illinois Gas Company - From the Culinary Olympic to the Caf Heidelberg
55 July - August 1969 Baking for Profit - National Magazine From the Culinary Olympic to the Caf Heidelberg
54 Spring 1969 Gourmet Cooking - Gourmet Cooking
53 March 1, 1969 Woman's Department Club - Terre Haute women enjoy gourmet touch
52 February, 1969
Terre Haute Tribune Star - Blue Flame Cooking School
51 February 13, 1969 The Terre Haute Star - Pastry Chef to Appear at Cooking School
50 February 10, 1969 The Terre Haute Star - Huge Crowd Flocks to Cooking School
49 February 2, 1969 Indiana Restaurant Assoc. - IRA Career Booth staffed by Chef Juergen
48 January 1, 1969 Air Force Times - Master Chef Sculpts With Pastry
47 January 1, 1969 Army Times - Master Chef Sculpts With Pastry
46 January 1, 1969 Navy Times - Master Chef Sculpts With Pastry
45 1969 BNN German News Paper
44 November 17, 1968 The Indianapolis Star - Feast at Brody's
43 October 8, 1968 The Indianapolis Star
42 September 13, 1968 Fort Sheridan, Illinois - Fifth Army Anniversary Cake made by J.J.
41 August 23, 1968 Fort Benjamin Harris - Jungbauer Receives Army Commendation Medal
40 August 23, 1968 The Harrison Post - Spec. 5 featured in Army Digest
39 August 15, 1968 North East Topics - Pastry Chef leaves Fort Harrison
38 August 14, 1968 Badische Neueste Nachrichten, Germany - J.J.'s ruhige Kugel in der US-Armee
37 August 14, 1968 Badische Neueste Nachrichten, Germany - Wehrdienst mit dem Spritzbeutel
36 August 1968 Army Digest - Unusual jobs add spice to army life
35 July - August 1968 Food Executive - Winner of National Culinary Arts Festival in Chicago
34 July-August 1968 Northern Illinois Gas Company - Famous Coffee House in Indianapolis
33 July 26, 1968 Fort Benjamin Harrison - Jungbauer is retired from the Army
32 July 15, 1968 Department of Defense, News Release - Lots of trophies and medals for this soldier
31 June 23, 1968 The Harrison Post - Pastry Chef Wins 5
30 July 15, 1968 United States Army - School Center News Release
29 June 7, 1968 The Harrison Post - Pastry Chef Wins 5 Out Of 6 National Awards in Chicago Food Show
28 May 31, 1968 Fort Sheridan, Illinois - Grant Prize in Chicago for Indiana Soldier
27 April 28, 1968 The Indianapolis Star - Art for the Stomach's Sake
26 March 1, 1968 Fort Benjamin Harrison - Hobnobbing Pastries to Washington, D.C. Senate
25 February 16, 1968 Indianapolis Star - Colossal Banquet for 500 in Washington, D.C.
24 February 16, 1968 The Harrison Post - Pastry Artist Kneads No Publicity
23 February 2, 1968 Indiana Restaurant Assoc. - Career Booth Jungbauer volunteers for Achivement Fair
22 November 9, 1967 The Indianapolis Star - Army Chef Is Master Of Art In Food
21 October 20, 1967 The Harrison Post - (Outstanding Entries) Chef displays Indiana Grand Award in Food
20 October 13, 1967 The Indianapolis Star - Army Chef Wins State Restaurateurs' Contest
19 October 12, 1967
Indianapolis Northside Topics - Fort Chef enters Culinary Competition
18 October 12, 1967
WFBM - Carolyn Churchman - Coffee at the Marott
17 October 6, 1967 Fort Benjamin Harrison - Local Soldier Vying For Culinary Prize
16 October 1967 Hoosier Chef - J.J., First Place Winner Midwest Culinary Art Show
15 June 23, 1967 Fort Benjamin Harrison - Flag Day And Army 192nd Birthday Cake
14 June 22, 1967 The Suburban & Lawrence Journal - Fort Harrison Celebrates Army Birthday
13 December 23, 1966 Fort Benjamin Harrison News - A German Pastry Chef at Fort Harrison
12 December 23, 1966 Fort Sheridan Tower Army Magazine, IL
11 December 12, 1966 The sheridan tower
10 November 18, 1966 Fort Benjamin Harrison
9 ca. 1966 Badische Presse, Karlsruhe - Suesse Karriere eines jungen Briganten
8 March 1966 The Culinarian, Tucson, AZ - Gourmet pastry buffet at the El Dorado Lodge
7 Winter 1965 Spreckels Sugar Company - Powder sugar and egg white make fantastic creation
6 October 13, 1965 The Sacramento Bee CA - El Dorado Hotel displays 6-foot Eiffel Tower
5 October 12, 1965 The Sacramento Bee CA - Young Chef makes 6 Foot Eiffel Tower
4 October 5, 1965 The Sacramento Union, - California Local TV station admires Chef Jungbauer's sugar creation
3 July 4, 1964 Hotel and Restaurant News, Stowe, VT - An Epicurean Array
2 March 28, 1964 Boston, Massachusetts - Escoffier Dinner Party
1 March 1964 Stadtler Hilton - Boston Hotel On The Move

 

The Louisiana Courier
August 9, 2015
A Busy Summer Continues
Donna Knight - Syndicated Columnist

Hi, My name is Donna Knight & I am a Hoosier by birth who now resides in Houma, Louisiana.
I rencently visited Indianapolis & my son took me to lunch at the Heidelberg Haus.
I wrote about that visit in one of my columns that appears in 462 newspapers. Hope you enjoy reading about how much I enjoyed my visit.
Sincerely, Donna Knight

Condensed article:
My list of places to visit Indianapolis gets longer and longer each time I go back. I always visit as many family members as I can and try to visit as many of my longtime friends as well...Another place I love to visit when I go back is the Heidelberg Haus on Pendleton Pike in Indianapolis. Being of French and German descent, I love the tastes and smells of that wonderful restaurant and shop.
Wursts of all kinds are available for sale as well as virtually anything German. Just walking through the shop is a memorable experience, and I feel like I've just taken a trip for an hour or so to Germany. The food is incredible. The potato salad they serve is exactly the same as my German grandmother used to make. I make a pretty good imitation, but the potato salad at the Heidelberg Haus is the real thing.
I remember that my grandmother used to say that mayonnaise and eggs had no place in her potato salad. She made the old-fashioned German kind with bacon and dill and served warm. Some of my fondest childhood memories are of Granny cooking in her kitchen making homemade noodles, sauerkraut and dumplings, "kuchen" bread and other savory dishes. My Mom learned her cooking skills from Granny. Neither one cooked "fancy," but their food was always tasty, filling and just delicious.
So as I return from Louisiana to Indiana for a visit, I look forward to enjoying all the things I miss while living in my adopted home of Houma.

Indianapolis Monthly
May 2015
Gourmet A Go-Go

Your everything Guide to the City's Best Specialty Markets
Heidelberg Haus
It's a Deutsch wonderland inside this festive 47-year old bakery rimmed with shelves of gnome figurines and decorative bier steins. While your eyes feast on the German knicknacks and birghtly packaged imports like Kinder chocolates and Schluckwerder's marzipan, your nose will lead you straight to the cases of layered cakes, strudels, Danishes, pretzels, and shiny loaves of bread baked daily by co-owner Juergen Jungbauer, provided pastries to Lyndon B. Johnson (corrected)
Insider Tip: Get your lot laugen pretzel halved and slathered in butter. Go There for: Black Forest Cake
address + 3 pictures

Country Living Magazine
November, 2014
Collecting - Antique finds and what they are worth

What is it? and what is it worth?
The Heidelberg Haus supplied us with a few older springerle cookies molds
These intricate templates originated in Germany in the 14th century. (Springerle is German for "little knight") Many U.S. models are from the 1800s where the country saw an influx of German immigrants.
1. Eight Panel Mold - The images on this piece depict traditional German icons, including edelweiss flowers and a pretzel. (individual cookies were cut along the framed edges.) The circa-1900 mold sells for $120. A similar version from the 14th century would go for several thousand.
2. Nine-Panel Rolling Pin - Carvedf rom maple in the 1880s, this stunning rolling pin impresssed nine tiny images celebrating the summer harvest into dough. This rare and wonderfully preserved springerle example is now worth $100
3. Two-Panel Mold - This petite stamp has especially deep-set carvings that result in cookies with sharp distinct designs. Because it was carved relatively recently - 1940 - it nets and estimate of $35
The Heidelberg Haus Antique Bakery Museum at 7625 Pendleton Pike, Indianapolis, Indiana features hundreds of exquisitly carved wooden springerle molds dating back to 17th century


Indiana German Heritage Society & IUPUI Max Kade German American Center
Fall 2014
Juergen Jungbauer - Hoosier German-American of the Year!!


Juergen (JJ) Jungbauer was named by IGHS as 2014 Hoosier German-American of the Year. He has been a fixture on the German landscape of Indianapolis since 1968 and has been a loyal and enthusiastic supporter and friend of the Indiana Gemran Heritage Society for its 30 years.
JJ has been a generous supporter of all things German, including assisting the Indiana German Heritage Society by selling its books and by donating baked goods to IGHS events and has been a Stammtisch speaker in 2010 on the topic of "Easter Season Baking Traditions." He is generous with his time to school groups and has been tireless in promoting German Culinary traditions with his classes and his bakery museum in the shop. He is a charter member of the German American Klub and has been recognized for his Springerle on the Food Network's "Food Finds."
Born during the Second World War in Karlsruhe, Baden, JJ trained at Berufsschule Fuer des Nahrungsgewerbe. He worked in Munich and as a Pastry Chef on the SS Hanseatic of the Hamburg-American Line. He emigrated in 1963 and was drafted in the U.S. Army in 1966. He described being drafted as the "best thing that ever happened to me" and his induction was a great boon for Indianapolis where he was stationed at Fort Benjamin Harrison and served with distinction as the Pastry Chef in the Officers Club.
The Army gave him opportunities and a following of fans. After receiving the Army Commendation Medal for meritorious work in the kitchen, he was discharged in 1968 and immediately opened the now famous Heidelberg Haus Bakery and Cafe in Lwarence where Fort Benjamin Harrison was located. The Heidelberg has been an outpost for authentic German cakes, pastry, and breads as well as German groceries and authentic German import items including clothing, Christmas ornaments, bumper stickers, flags, and just plain (but authentic) kitsch.
JJ has received numerous awards including Sagamore of the Wabash, 2014; Kentucky Colonel, 1974; Indiana Restaurant & Lodging Association Hall of Fame, 2013; and the U.S. Culinary Olympics, Gold Medal team, 1968.

Juergen Jungbauer has been a loyal friend of German organizations and a promoter of German culture and deserves to be recognized as Hoosier German American of 2014.

Indystar.com
August 17, 2014
Test Your Neighborhood Knowledge


The following four pictures of Indianapolis landmarks are located in which neighborhood
1- Black Ace Brewing Company
2- Fresh time Farmers Market
3- Hopcat Brewery
4- Cafe Heidelberg (is located on Pendleton Pike just I 465 in Lawrence)
This German Bakery has been in this suberb for more than 45 years. Do you know where they are?
Answers:
1- Irvington 2- Greenwood 3- Broad Ripple 4- Lawrence
Pictures by Matt Detrich and Joe Vitti

 

August 7, 2014
Juergen Jungbauer Owner Heidelberg Cafe Sweetens the Deal!
The Sertoma Club of East Indianapolis
Newsletter

"JJ", previous speaker, owner of the Heideberg Cafe nicely supplemented his talk about "Coming to America" and the challenges of a small business owner with a really nice assortment of Blackforest Chocolate cake and German Chocolate cake (shown above). Needless to say, all of the above "samples" were snapped up! We learned that our own Young Park is such a loyal customer that he stops by the Heidelberg every day. If you haven't been there, check it out at 7625 Pendleton Pike!
Juergen Jungbauer, JJ! Very colorful Character
Juergen Jungbauer, better known as "JJ," came and gave us a very colorful take on his story as an immigrat from Germany and independent business owner of the Heidelberg Cafe. He was born in the Black Forest of Germany, which coincidentally also happens to be the name of the very tasty chocolate cake in 1943. He mentioned that WWII bombs landed a short distance from where he was born. He proudly proclaimed that he has lived the American Dream. He came to the U.S. in 1963 and a few years later was drafted intot he U.S. Army. JJ was initially assigned to a finance unit. But that gig just didn't fit his skill set. He convinced the higher ups in the army that he could better serve his new country as a pastry chef! He later opened his store in 1968. He joked that the only thing that has changed in his store are the prices! "JJ," thanks for bringing the great stories and samples!
2 pictures

The Sertoma Club of East Indianapolis
July 3, 2014
Aaron Koenig
Upcoming Sertoma Calendar

July 17 -
Juergen Jungbauer, "JJ" Heidelberg Cafe
Owner, German Immigrant
"Coming To America" He will bring samples!!
Juergen Jungbauer, or "JJ," obviously knows what it tkaes to attract people to his restaurant - quality food and an enjoyable experience. Upon walking into "Heidelberg Haus" it is apparent that JJ has poured his heart into his restaurant for countless years. Customers are warmly greeted by a stunning array of signs, antiques, and various trinkets that almost completely cover the walls.
A first time customer immediately understands why the restaurant has been around for so long - even before the food comes. The place exudes personality, and JJ's passion transcends to customers through the environment of the restaurant. The restaurant is by no means fancy, but rather it could be described best as intriguing.
1 picture

Indiana German Heritage Society & IUPUI Max Kade German American Center Newsletter
Summer, 2014
JJ Jungbauer Named Sagamore of the Wabash by Governor Pence
William Selm
The Sagamore of the Wabash award was created by Governor Ralph Gates in 1945 as a Hoosier version of the Kentucky Colonel title awarded by that state. The term "sagamore" was used by the American Indian Tribes of the northeastern United States to describe a great man to whom the tribe would look to for wisdom and advice. The Sagamore of the Wabash is an award of high honor bestowed by the Governor as a tribute to those who rendered distinguished service to the state of Indiana. Past recipients have included astronauts, presidents, ambassadors, artists, musicians, polititicians, and ordinary cititzens who have contributed greatly to the Hoosier heritage.
This spring, Juergen "JJ" Jungbauer, was awarded the title of Sagamore of the Wabash by Governor Mike Pence in honor of his work to revitalize the East side of Indianapolis.
1 Picture

 

Not the Leastside: 25 things to love about Indy's Eastside (condensed)
March 20, 2014
IndyStar.com

by Beth Murphy

The Eastside plays a proud role in Indianapolis' history, and many loyal residents wouldn't live anywhere else. Julie Young, author of "Eastside Indianapolis: A Brief History," said in 2009. "Eastsiders are a fiercely loyal bunch. No matter where you go in life, your connection to the Eastside remains."
But the Eastside remains an important region of the city, one that could build on its storied past to have a bright future. There's a lot going on the Eastside; you just have to pay attention and look a little closer. And make sure you're not looking down your nose.
Of course, "The Eastside" covers a vast area, from compact older neighborhoods near Downtown Indy to newer suburban housing divisions and family farms farther out in the country. This is a aglimpse at some of the bright spots and interesting places and events, some old and some new.

#9 Heidelberg Haus: It's kitschy, but authentic. The pastries are to die for. Located northeast in Lawrence, Heidelberg Haus, 7625 Pendleton Pike, was opened in 1968 and serves food seven days a week. You'll sometimes hear the German language spoken by diners, and servers are dressed in tradtional Bavarian outfits called dirndl (some call them "beer maid" dresses). You're encouraged to seat yourself next to a stranger in the old European custom of table sharing and order some wiener wuerst, kassler rippchen or fleischkaese. Heidelberg Haus is also a bakery and giftshop (no longer selling lederhosen, though). Building upon Heidelberg and other ethnic restaurants and shops in the area, Lawrence city officials in November announced plans to make Pendleton Pike "the Eastside international marketplace."

For the entire article:
http://www.indystar.com/story/opinion/2014/03/19/dont-call-it-the-leastside/6288703/

Heidelberg Haus Celebrates its 45th Anniversary!!

The White House
March 07, 2014
Washington, DC 20500

Mr. Juergen Jungbauer
Heidelberg Haus
Pendleton Pike
Indianapolis, IN

The White House
Washington, D.C.

Thank you for the dedication you have shown in your community.
Our Nation relies on the faith and determination of the American people, and I admire your commitment.
I wish you all the best in your future endeavors.

Sincerely,
signed: Barack Obama

BADISCHE NEUESTE NACHRICHTEN, Karlsruhe, Germany
December 14, 2013
Badische Springerle fuer Naschkatze am Suedpol
Juergen Jungbauer fuehrt deutsches Cafe in USA

Von unserem Redaktionsmitglied
Tina Kampf

Zwei Pfund seiner badischen Springerle liefert Juergen Jungbauer an den Suedpol. Gefragt ist das weihnachtliche Naschwerk zudem in ganz Amerika-wo der Karlsruher seit inzwischen 45 Jahren die deutsche Konditorenkunst pflegt. In seinem "Heidelberg Haus" in Indianapolis im Bundesstaat Indiana bietet er Kuchen und Torten, aber auch Lederhosen und Kuckucksuhren an. Und jetzt eben jede Menge Plaetzchen.
Das Geschaeft laeuft, "die Menschen hier sind sehr gluecklich, dass sie ein deutsches Cafe besuchen koennen", ist Jungbauer sicher. Dennoch: Er denke "langsam" daran, etwas weniger zu arbeiten, versichert der 70-Jaehrige, den es vor 50 Jahren ins Land der unbegrenzten Moeglichkeiten zog. Nach seiner Lehre in der Hofkonditorei Walter Schwarz in der Karlstrasse reiste Jungbauer zunaechst einige Zeit durch Deutschland. 1962 heuerte er dann in Hamburg auf der "Hanseatic" an, auf der er als zweiter Mann des Zuckerhandwerks in der Kombuese sein Koennen unter Beweis stellte. Schliesslich wurde ihm von einem Passagier eine Stelle in einem Restaurant in New York angeboten - und ohne ein Wort englisch zu sprechen, ging der Karlsruher schliesslich in der amerikanischen Metropole an Land.
Er blieb in den USA, arbeitete in Hotels in Kalifornien und Arizona. Irgendwann zog ihn das Militaer ein, das ihn schliesslich ebenfalls in der Baeckeri beschaeftigte. Nach dem Wehrdienst 1968 war dann ploetzlich die Idee da; Er wird in Amerika bleiben und dort eine deutsche Konditorei eroeffnen- mit der sich der Sohn eines Metzgermeisters bald einen Namen im Land machte. Ein Geschenkeladen, ein Lebensmittelgeschaeft und ein antikes Baeckereimuseum kamen im Lauf der Jahre hinzu.
Zeitungen, Zeitschriften und Fernsehsender: Immer wieder wurde ueber den Deutschen und seine suessen Spezialitaeten berichtet. Und seine Springele verschickt der Karlsruher in ganz Amerika und auch in andere Laender.
Gefertigt werden die Plaetzchen inzwischen auch von Jungbauers Schwiegersohn Charlie Corkwell, den er in den vergangenen sechs Jahren zum Konditor ausbildete.
Im kommenden Jahr will Jungbauer zudem einen deutschen Konditor und Baecker nach Indiana holen. "Ich hoffe, dass das Geschaeft noch wietere 45 Jahre blueht - unter der Fuehrung meiner Tochter"

 

State of Indiana
Council of the Sagamores of the Wabash

Michael R. Pence
Governor of the State of Indiana


Know All Men by these Presents:
WHEREAS, the Greatness of the Sons of Indiana derives, in part, from qualities possessed by the noble Chieftains of the Indian Tribes which once romaed its domain; and
WHEREAS, it has been the immemorial custom of the State of Indiana to attract to its support those who have exhibited such qualities; and
WHEREAS, there has endeared himself to the Citizens of Indiana, one Juergen Jungbauer distinguished by his Humanity in Living, his Loyalty in Friendship, his Wisdom in Council, and his Inspiration in Leadership:
NOW, THEREFORE, recognizing his greatness and desiring to avail myself of his counsel, I do hereby appoint him a Chieftain upon my Staff with the rank and title of SAGAMORE of the WABASH
WITNESS my hand and Seal of the Council of the Sagamores, at Indianapolis, Indiana, this the Eighth day of December, in the Year of Our Lord, Two Thousand and Thirteen

(The Sagamore of the Wabash is an award of high honor bestowed by the bestowed by the Governor as a tribute to those who rendered distinguished service to the State of Indiana)

City of Indianapolis
Office of the Mayor
December 4, 2013
In recognition of
Heidelberg Haus
German Bakery and Gift Shop
45th Anniversary

Congratulations on 45 years as a locally owned business. This longevity is a testament to the creativity of the Jungbauer family and staff in continuing to maintain German traditions with baked goods and products. Your commitment to remain an integral part of our community is most appreciated.
In testimony wherof, I have hereunto subscribed my name and caused the great seal of the city of Indianapolis to be affixed this 4th day of December in the year two thousand thirteen

Gregory A. Ballard
Mayor
City of Indianapolis

 

City of Lawrence, Indiana
Office of the Mayor
Proclamation
December 2, 2013

TO ALL WHOM THESE PRESENTS MAY COME, GREETINGS

WHEREAS, the City of Larence congratulates Juergen Jungbauer on the 50th anniversary year of his immigration to the United States of America from his native Germany, arriving in 1963 with $30 in his pocket and a dream in his heart; and,

WHEREAS, Juergen Jungbauer served in the U.S. Army as a Special Pastry Chef and with hard work and dedicatino he has been able to present his pastries to the U.S. House of Representatives in Washington, D.C., became a member of the Culinary Olympic Team which won over 21 competitions, has been featured on the Food Network, interviewed on NPR, highlighted in 26 TV appearances and has had over 240 write ups in local, state, national and German newspapers; and,

WHEREAS, Juergen Jungbauer became a U.S. citizens in 1972, a Kentucky Colonel in 1973 and was recently inducted in the Indiana Chefs Hall of Fame; and,

WHEREAS, Juergen Jungbauer and his wife, Gabi, started the Heidelberg Haus Cafe and Bakery on december 8, 1968 which has become a beloved landmark in the City of Lawrence and has provided employment to 16 employees for 45 years who have been able to feed and clothe their families and send their children to college because of its success.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Dean E. Jessup, Mayor of the City of Larence, Indiana, hereby proclaim "JUERGEN JUNGBAUER A DISTINGUISHED BUSINESS OWNER" in the City of Lawrence to recognize and honor the 45 years of love, service, agood food and exquisite vision, determination and inspirational accomplishments.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have herunto set my hand and caused to be affixed the seal of the City of Lawrence on the 2nd day of December in the year 2013.

Dean E. Jessup
Mayor, City of Lawrence

 

United States Senate
Washington, D.C. 20510-1405
Senator Dan Coats, Indiana
November 27, 2013

Dear Juergen:

Thank you for dedicating nearly 50 years of hard work to the Indianapolis community. It is an honor to represent Hoosiers such as you in the United States Senate.

2013 is truly a special year for you because of the significant milestones you are celebrating. I join with your friends and family to recognize the 50th anniversary of your immigration to the United States, your 70th birthday, and the 45th anniversary of Heidelberg Cafe and Bakery. Wessen Brot ich esse, Sein Lied ich singe. You are an outstanding citizen of Indiana and a role model for those that seek the American dream.

I wish you continued success in the future and my best wishes to you and your loved ones.

mit besten Wuenschen,

Dan Coats
U.S. Senator

Indianapolis Star
November 17, 2013
Leaders look to transform Pendleton Pike
by Kristine Guerra (condensed)
Pendleton Pike always has been one of Lawrence's major thoroughfares. Commuters drive by a series of restaurant chains, used car lots, shoebox stores and the occasional gentleman's club.
But cuty officials want Pendleton Pike also known as Ind. 67, to be more than a state highway. They want to build on a small but growing diversity of businesses there to turn the area into an international hotspot where people stop and dine, and where commerce thrives.
Keith Johnson, Mayor Dean Jessup's deputy cheif of staff, adding that there are already ethnic restaurnats and businesses on Pendleton Pike. "We thnk we can be the Eastide international marketplace"
Getting there would not be fast or easy epsecially for a cash-strapped city that's recovering from a $2 million budget shortfall. Larence's redevelopement commiission, however, has allotted funds for several capital improvement projects that officials hope would take the city a step further toward realizing their vision.
Timothy Joyce, economica development director, said improvements should start at the "gateway" to Larence - where Pendleton Pike and I-465 meet.
The redevelopement commission, which is funded through tax increment financing districts has alloted about $70,000 to create a landscaped median on the toroughfare from I-465 toward Franklin Road.
Juergen Jungbauer, who owns the Heidelberg Haus Cafe and Bakery off I -465, said he thinks Pendleton Pike has been long in need of improvemnts but doesn't favor the landscaped islands because it coujld potentially block views of business signs and advertisements.

Indianapolis Star
October 11, 2013
Local chefs rack up the awards

by Jolene Ketzenberger
It's always nice to be appreciated, and Indianapolis-area chefs, food artisans and restaurateurs have been getting attention lately.
The Indiana Restaurant and Lodging Association, for example, honored several chefs and inducted members into its hall of fame during its recent gala.
Steve Oakley, chef/owner at Oakleys Bistro, was honored as culinarian of the year, while Mike Cunningham of Cunningham Restaurant Group (which owns Mesh, Bru Burger Bar and Stone Creek Dining Company among other restaurants) received the group's restaurateur of the year award.
The restaurant association's hall of fame inductees included Hubert Schmeider, chef emeritus for Purdue University's hospitality and tourism management program, Edmund Gass, who served as executive chef at King Cole, and J.J. Jungbauer, who has owned and operated Heidelberg Haus for more than 45 years. Retiring restaurant association CEO John Livengood was awarded the 2013 Will Koch Indiana Tourism Leadership Award. (condensed)

Indiana Restaurant and Lodging Association Gala
2013 Indiana Restaurants Chef's Hall of Fame
awarded to
Juergen Jungbauer

In recognition of a longstanding career and service to the hospitality industry, contributions to the community, recognition of peers and personal commitment to the advancement of the hospitality industry of Indiana


Congratulations to Pastry Chef Juergen Jungbauer for being honored to the Indiana Chef's Hall of Fame
Fellow 1968 famous culinary Olympic gold medal winners, Chef Hubert Schmieder and Chef Edmond Gass presented the trophy to Juergen for the induction to the Indiana Chef's Hall of Fame this afternoon. Unfortunately J.J. was unable to attend the special gala dinner at the Marriott Hotel on September 24 due to scheduling conflicts, so he received this special award here today at the Heidelberg Cafe.
September 24, 2013
at the Indianapolis Marriott
Hall of Fame Inductees
The 1968 US Culinary Olympic Gold Medal Team
Edmond Gass
Juergen Jungbauer
Hubert Schmieder
also inducted:
George Brinkmoeller - Sherman House Inn
Gary Miller - State Park Inns

Indianapolis Star - Local Living
May 30, 2013
Places that feel like home

By Jen Bingham for Custom Publications
Certain local businesses are more than just businesses. They add character and warmth to the neighborhood. They make customers feel at home. Some have been local landmarks for decades. Others have spring up recently but complement the spirit of the area. These businesses almost always are locally owned, with hands-on owners who know their customers well. (condensed)
Landmark to the east
Heidelberg Haus in Lawrence is the definition of a local icon. Opened in the late 1960s, the German bakery and restaurant is widely known for its springerle cookies and distinctive decor. The gift shop is the icing on the cake. "The Heidelberg Haus is simultaneously one of the city's best bakeries, best lunch spots and best gift shops," said Evan Finch, who identifies himself as "a bumbling middle-aged glutton who resides in Warfleight." On paper, he's an advertising agency professional and go-to guru for anything you want to know about Indianapolis. "In just one trip, you can eat a bratwurst for lunch, grab a slice of German chocolate cake for dessert and buy a pair of lederhosen on your way out."

Indianapolis Star
May 10, 2013
For a true taste of Indy, try these 50 places

By Jolene Ketzenberger
Inspired by the recently released list of the world's 50 best restaurants, I started making a list of restaurants that are so much a part of the city that you have to go. So here's my collection of area restaurants, in no particular order, that offer a taste of where we're going and where we've been.
How many of these restaurants have you been to? Go jto IndyStar.com/DineIndy50 to check off the restaurants you've been to and share the results with your friends. Follow the challenge results on Twitter at #DineIndy50. For Heidelberg Haus picture see picture 35.
Where did you go for dinner? See how many of Indy's top 50 restaurants you've been to. It's what everyone's talking about. And here is the short description of the 50 restaurants you must try.
Heidelberg Haus, 7625 Pendleton Pike
This kitschy Eastside institution provides hearty German food and excellent pastries.

 

Indianapolis Star
December 21, 2012
Taste - Gourmet Gifts for Every Budget

We've got ideas for each foodie on your list
By Jolene Ketzenberger
You have only a few more shopping days till Christmas, but never fear -we've found plenty of last-minute ways to fill the stockings of your favorite foodies.
Baking enthusiasts can make their own classic holiday cookies with a springerle rolling pin, from $14.85 at Heidelburg Haus, 7625 Pendleton Pike, or at www.heidlberghaus.com Or just buy some of the restaurant/bakery's famous springerles, available through mid-January for #5.95 per half-pound.

Love springerles at the Heidelberg Haus? Make your own using this rolling pin.

 

Indianapolis Star
December 13, 2012
Ancient, Artful, Christmas Treat

By Sarah Richcreek
During the holidays, we all get out our special, once-a-year treasures - our family ornaments, fine china and other festive decorations. At Heidelberg Haus, Juergen "JJ" Jungbauer's coveted springerle molds move to center stage. While many of these unique molds grace the walls of his "German general store" in Lawrence throughout the year, they are put to use for only six weeks each year, beginning in early November.
Springerle is a traditional, anise-flavored Christmas cookie prepared in German-speaking countries as early as the 15th century. The dough is hand-pressed into a mold to emboss an image. To ensure that the image isn't lost during baking, the dough has to rest overnight to dry. The cookie "springs up" in the oven, creating what konditors (confectioners) call a "foot" while doubling in height. The result: a crisp, biscuit-like exterior with a soft, chewy interior. " A good springerle should be white on top and golden brown on the bottom," Jungbauer said. While springerle cookies are indeed a treat, the molds are a treasure. Until modern times, molds were made by hand from wood, clay or metal. Wooden molds were intricately carved, and each bakery had its own distinctive molds.
Motifs began with religious images, but evolved to display a wide variety of things such as flowers, animals and crests. Jungbauer, 69, has been collecting springerle molds since age 16, two years before he moved to America from Karlsruhe, Germany. He has more than 100 molds, some so valuable he stores them in a safe. "It's very had to find old, fancy molds. New molds aren't nearly as intricate," he said. ONe of his favorite molds is a larger wooden one about 7-by-5 inches that dates to the 1840s. It depicts a gallant "Old King Fritz" - Frederick the Great of Prussia - astride his steed. The Germanic National Museum offered Jungbauer $5,000 for it. This was 20 years ago, and he still won't let go of it. Jungbauer opened Heidelberg Haus in 1968; he met his wife, Gabi, when she was a customer. The shop earned international fame in 2005 when Jungbauer was featured on the Food Network's "Food Finds" three years in a row for his springerle cookies. The shop began getting calls from as far as Japan and, surprisingly, even Germany.
"It's a sentimental cookie," he said. "People cry when they get them because Grandma used to make them." But he will be the first to tell you that not everyone likes them. The licorice-flavored jolt of anise deters some, but others make sure to stock up on this once-a-year delicacy. Because springerle contain no fat, they dry out quickly and become rock-hard after a couple of weeks. (Some prefer the hard cookies - perfect for dunking in coffee.)
Hardcore springerle fans have invented interesting ways of keeping the cookies soft. One man bought a cigar humidor specifically for these treats. Another woman puts the springerle in a covered bowl on a chair seat, which is then placed inside her shower on hot for 10 minutes or until desired softness is achieved. A simpler suggestion is to put an apple slice in the container of cookies.
Time is running out for this seasonal sweet, as Jungbauer will be shelving the springerle molds again soon. Springerle ($5.95 per half-pound, which includes 12 to 15 cookies) and other German holiday favorites - pfeffernuesse, cinnamon sticks and hazelnut cookies - are available for only a few more weeks.

Joe Vitti / The Star
1) Jurgen Jungbauer holds a springerle cookie in his right hand and the antique wooden mold used to create it in his left.
2) Jungbauer, with his daughter, Angela Corkwell, shows a mural on a wall of Heidelberg Haus. Some people depicted are family members.
3) Springerle cookies, molded with highly detailed images, date to the Middle Ages.

PBS- WTIU
November 19, 2012

WTIU Producer, Sarah Curtiss
The Heidelberg Haus Cafe and Bakery was featured on this special presentation about interesting food establishments called "The Weekly Special" Check out our very own chef Jungbauer and Pastry Chef Charlie Corkwell highlight our Christmas cookies and especially the famous Springerle cookies. Also shown are the antique bakery museum at 7625 Pendleton Pike, Indianapolis, Indiana. This particular show can also be seen on www.heidelberghaus.com

Indianapolis Star
October 27, 2012
City striving to step out of Indianapolis' shadow - front page picture

By Robert King and Kristine Guerra
The city of Lawrence, trying to carve itself a unique identity as more than just another bedroom community, came to a crucial juncture this week. The city adopted a balanced budget, but it required tough choices that raised concern about whether Indiana's 18th largest city is still fiscally viable. More broadly, the budget process sparked an existential conversation about what the future holds for a community that has long struggled to emerge from Indianapolis' shadow. Jessup said the long-term goal is for the area to be bustling with local shops, boutiques and restaurants that are unique to Lawrence - much like Heidelberg Haus, a 40-year-old building next to I-465 on Pendleton Pike. It's a cafe beautified by bright colors and flowers out front, along with a 3-foot-tall statue of a grinning dwarf posing next to an electric pole.
Owner and pastry chef Juergen Jungbauer brought his German roots and recipes to Lawrence in 1968 when he opened the cafe. Over time, Heidelberg Haus has become popular with the locals and has morphed into a destination restaurant for locals and visitors. Jungbauer, who worked as a baker and a cook at Fort Harrison for two years before opening his cafe, has the same vision for Lawrence as Jessup and other community leaders. He wants to add a slice of his culture to Pendleton Pike, one that shows a local vibe not experienced anywhere else.
"Our town is just so drawn out left and right by commercial things," he said. "We need a little more identity."

Indianapolis Star
Taste Tidbits
October 12, 2012
When Apple is King

By Ashley Petry
Because of this summer's drought and high temperatures, you-pick apples are in short supply. But restaurants around the city are still offering apple-themed dishes that will conquer your craving for straight-from-the-orchard tastes.
Apple Strudel
At this German restaurant, apple strudel is an art form. The dessert ($2.95) is "dome-shaped with flaky dough on the outside and chopped cinnamon apples on the inside," said the store manager Angela Corkwell. "We make it in a large loaf and cut it into six pieces. "The eatery also whips up apple cheesecake, apple turnovers and occasionally a secret recipe called apple dream cake.
1 picture

STATE OF INDIANA
Office of the Governor
Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr.

To All To Whom These Presents May Come, GREETINGS:
WHEREAS, some individuals distinguish themselves through significant contributions to their communities; and
WHEREAS, the qualities and characteristics of such individuals reflect the best of the great State of Indiana, and
WHEREAS, the actions of these individuals endear them in the hearts and minds of all Hoosiers; and
WHEREAS, Indiana treasures individuals who give their time and talents out of an abiding sense of responsibility, commitment and concern for others; and
WHEREAS, Juergen Jungbauer is such an individual who has earned the respect and admiration of Hoosiers across the state and is worthy to join the ranks of these honorees:

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr., Governor of the State of Indiana, do hereby de clare and appoint

Juergen Jungbauer
as a
DISTINGUISHED HOOSIER

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have here unto set my hand and cause to be affixed the Great Seal of the State of Indiana at the Capitol in Indianapolis on this 12th day of September in the year 2012.
Signed by the Governor of the State of Indiana, Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr.

 

Indianapolis Star
Taste Indy Living
June 1, 2012
Sweet Secrets

By Jolene Ketzenberger
Check out some delicious desserts worth a second Look.
When it comes to sweets, it's hard not to play favorites. After all, the classics are so appealing. From old-school cherry Danish and buttery sticky buns to classic coconut cream pie, luscious lemon bars and an unusual take on a summertime s'more. Taste turned up a variety o sweet treats worth a try.
Cherry Danish, $1.80
Heidelberg Haus
If it feels like you've stepped back in time when you sit down for coffee or lunch at the Heidelburg Haus, there's a good reason. The cafe menu hasn't changed since 1969. You won't find pies, muffins or doughnuts t this authentic German bakery.But you will find all sorts of old-school classics, and it doesn't get any more old school than a cherry Danish. Sit down on a stool at the counter, have a cup of coffee, and forget about the smartphone buzzing in your pocket. Or buy a few extras and take them back to the office. Your co-workers will thank you. And if you don't see the Danish, try another variety of pastry, all made fresh each day. "We just make everyday a little something different, " said owner J.J. Jungbauer. "We bake for the day. That's the dream all my life that I've had." Don't miss: Also check out the perennially popular multi-layered black forest cake.

Tribune Star Valley Life Terre Haute
A bit of Whimsy
December 11, 2011
By Mark Bennett
, (812) 231-4377 or mark.bennett@tribstar.com
Ornamental Lawn Creatures Origins date back to Germany in the mid-1800s
Lorrine Martell McCain enjoys the plants in her yard, especially in the months when her garden blooms. "This is a happy place for me," she said, standing in the yard of her family's home on Terre Haute's central north side. It's a peaceful place." In warm seasons, it's a colorful place as well, dotted with yellow roses and other flowers. The hues aren't limited to flowers, though. The plants and bushes have company - garden gnomes. McCain collects the small, ornamental lawn creatures whose origins date back to Germany in the mid-1800s. Nearly two centuries later, they remain poular with gardeners in Europe and beyond, with an estimated 25 million still occupying yards and gardens in Germany alone.
The gnomes' European roots led to McCains interest. A family friend found some for her in the gift shop of a German restaurant in Indianapolis, the Heidelberg Haus, a few years ago. With Bulgarian heritage in her family tree, the 44-year-old Terre Haute native said, "I was interested in things from Germany, Bulgaria and France."
The gnomes from the Heidelberg cafe caught her attention, especially on a visit to the gift shop. "We saw all these little faces staring at us, "McCain said. Now, her collection of garden gnomes totals nearly 50. Many were made by the Heissner Company, a line that is sold at the Heidelberg. Once made primarily of clay more than 150 years ago, many modern garden gnomes ar crafted from pliable plastic. At prices ranging from $10 to $400, the figurines ar cast in jovial poses holding tools, working or sleeping.
Heidelberg owner Juergen "J.J." Jungbauer has sold the gnomes to thousands of gardeners such as McCain since he opened the Indianapolis restaurant in1968. "They're just fun," said Jungbauer, who grew up in Black forest,Germany, and moved to the United States in 1963. In his homeland, having a gnome in the garden "is just a must," he explained. According to European folklore, the garden gnomes are believed to "protect your home and family, and bring you good luck and good cheer," said Jungbauer, 68. "They're happy fellows," Their popularity spread when Sir Charles Isham brought 150 gnomes from Germany back to his home in England in 1847, according to legend. Gnomes haven't disappeared from Great Britain. One of the world's most notable collections belongs to Ann Atkin, who has more than 2,000 gnomes on her estate in North Devon, England, where she maintains the Gnome Reserve.....
pictures

Indianapolis Monthly
10 Best Holiday Treats
December 2011

Best of the Holidays. Heidelberg Haus is voted Number 7 (condensed)
1- Reynolds Farms - Holiday Light Display
2- Museum of Art - Winter Wonderland
3- Tom Santelli of Zionsville - Famous Sleigh Ride
4- The Indiana State Museum - Window Display
5- Rock Bottom Brewery - Seasonal Beer
6- Indianapolis Art Gardens - Free Concert
7- Juergen Jungbauer of Heidelberg Haus (7625 Pendleton Pike, 547-1230) pulls his antique molds off the shelf for just a few weeks each year to bake springerle, German Christmas cookies flavored with anise oil and rolled into fanciful shapes, such as ducks and fruit.
8-Hilton Circle Theater - Christmas Show
9- South Bend Chocolate Company - Hot Chocolate
10- The Container Store - Stocking Stuffers

Indiana State Fair
August 5 - 21, 2011
Willkommen to Germany!

Grand Hall International Pavilion.
Created in partnership with Indiana German organizations and the Indiana Economic Development Corporation, this exhibit presents both traditional and contemporary Germany and the close ties the country has with Indiana. German performances, food and displays will take visitors on a trip overseas!
Experience German culture and its rich connections to Indiana. The Heidelberg Haus Cafee staff in their colorful German dirndls provide tasty German pastries, pretzels, and coffee. A full arrangement of German souvenirs and gifts create a unique ambiance to this very successful German representation.
Meet Sister City Representatives
Visit the life-size Gingerbread House
Take a look at the Berlin Wall up close and personal
Listen to Traditional and Contemporary Live Music
Dress up in traditional lederhosen and dirndl
Make Bavarian hats and Christmas ornaments.
Daily entertainments and bands performing

The Indianapolis Star
April 22, 2011
DANKESCHOEN!
To: The Indiana Insurance Company and
Wilds Restoration Services LLC

For the excellent work in restoring our baking area after the devastating electrical fire March 6th. We are happy to bake again after almost four weeks of restoration. All fourteen employees of Heidelberg Cafe hope that our esteemed customers will return and patronize our establishment again. PS: our restaurant, main store, and antique bakery museum were luckily not affected by the fire and smoke damage.
Heidelberg Haus/German Cafe/Bakery/Giftshop/Grocery, established 1968.

The Indianapolis Star
March 17, 2011
German cafe to stay shut a bit
Heidelberg Haus expects it will reopen in 2 weeks after fire cleanup, repairs finished
by Jeff Swiatek

Heidelberg Haus' bakery will remain closed for two more weeks as employees clean up from an electrical fire that damaged the back of the building and destroyed food stocks.
"It really hurt the bakery," Juergen Jungbauer said of the March 6 fire. He owns the Northeastside German cafe bakery and gift shop with his wife, Gabi.
The fire started in an electrical panel and extinguished itself after pouring acrid smoke throughout part of the building, he said. "Somehow the good Lord watched over me. The whole place could have burned down," he said. "The fire chief said he'd never seen anything like it, that it would go out by itself."
In 43 years in business, it is the first insurance claim of this kind for the business at 7625 Pendleton Pike, Jungbauer said. The bakery has been featured in segments on TV's Food Network.
He said the pungent odor of smoke forced him to throw away hundreds of pounds of flour, sugar, nuts, flavorings and other food items. Refrigerated food also had to be thrown out because the refrigerators failed. The gift shop remains open. Jungbauer said it should take about two more weeks to rebuild the electrical system and get the bakery restocked and back in service.

The Indianapolis Star
March 15, 2011
Briefly Around the State
Fire will shut German bakery for 2 additional weeks
(Star report)

Heidelberg Haus' bakery will remain closed for two additional weeks as employees clean up from an electrical fire that damaged the back of the building and destroyed food stocks. The gift shop of the Northeastside business remains open.
"It really hurt the bakery," Juergen Jungbauer said of the March 6 fire. He owns the German cafe, bakery and gift shop with his wife, Gabi.
The 43-year-old bakery at 7625 Pendleton Pike has been featured in segments on the Food Network.

Discovery Channel/ Road Eats
February 05, 2011
One Hour TV Show
Our small-town bakery/cafe has been selected for a Pilot Program of the Discovery Channel tentatively called 'Road Eats.' Only one establishment in each state has been chosen for an hourly program. The Heidelberg Haus has been chosen to represent Indiana. The show is about truck drivers traveling through America and stopping and eating at their favorite restaurants. The show will probably air sometime in late Summer or Fall. No definite viewing date has been established. It's quite an honor to be chosen from thousands of restaurants or bakeries in Indiana for this presentation.
The 5-man Discovery Channel TV crew from New York spent 11 hours taping at our bakery and cafe on February 5th, 2011, right during our big blizzard!!! The truck-driver, our hero in this reality show, even baked our famous Black Forest cake and tried his hands on making Springerle cookies. Other places the Discovery Channel taped famous restaurants are Arnolds in Cincinatti OH, Tallulahs in Oxford MS. The Blacksheep in Carvers VA, Larry Drury Cafe in St. Louis: Sparky's Restaurant in New Mexico, Kooky Canuch in Memphis TN, Pig In Pig Out in Wichita KS. Camacho's Place in El Centro CA

 

 

The Indianapolis Star
November 17, 2009
6-year project turns road into thoroughfare
Pendleton Pike retailers hope customers return
by Kevin O'Neal

On Thursday, Cafe Heidelberg German Bakery will have outlasted six years of construction along Pendleton Pike. "Business went way down, especially when they moved the construction to my side (of the road), but we survived," said Juergen Jungbauer, owner of the German restaurant just northeast of the I-465 exit at Pendleton Pike. "We hope that people come back and patronize us again." At 9 a.m. Thursday, a ceremony will celebrate the completion of the last of the three phases of the road construction, the stretch from I-465 to Post Road. The entire project to modernize seven miles cost $51 million, took six years and covered two counties. Funds for the final phase, $26.8 million, came from Major Moves revenue from the long-term lease of the Indiana Toll Road, approved in 2006. Pendleton Pike was transformed from a 1950-style two-lane road to a four-lane thoroughfare from I-465 through Lawrence and Oaklandon in Marion County to near McCordsville in Hancock County.
Fifty years ago, a few gas stations and motels fronted Pendleton Pike. Today, retailers line the road, also marked as U.S. 36 and Ind. 67, and housing additions run the length of the widening project. The construction snarled access to retailers and homes along the road. Jungbauer, whose bakery, restaurant and video store have been in operation for 41 years, was please with the efforts of the Indiana Department of Transportation to make paths for traffic to get through the torn-up road to his business. However, Maria Pappas, part-owner of Papa's Pancake House, across the street at 7606 Pendleton Pike, disliked the way the project was handled. "We'll end up with less parking space, and we'll still have no business," said Pappas, whose restaurant has existed 38 years. "It looks nice, but it'll be no good to us." The traffic tie-ups cost Papa's so many customers that it had to cut operating hours and close early, Pappas said. During the road work, the long-closed Pendleton Pike Drive-In was demolished, along with its large screen and acres of weeds and woods. IN its place has gone an automated warehouse for Monarch Beverages, on property that has room for one business.

Indianapolis Dine
Issue 1/2009
A Sweet Life
by Peter Agostinelly and Photographs by Stacy Newgent

JUERGEN JUNGBAUER FOUND HIS NICHE AND THE AMERICAN DREAM CRAFTING GERMAN PASTRIES AND COOKIES FOR THE MASSES AT HEIDELBERG HAUS, 3 full pages.
You don't often run into people like Juergen Jungbauer, especially when you're dodging road construction and traffic on Pendleton Pike. Nor do hungry locals - or out-of-towners - often find in today's strip-center nation a visual wonderland like the Heidelberg Haus. Since the 1960s, the five-stores-in-one destination has served diners and sweets lovers as a bakery, German cafe, pastry shop, specialty grocery and kitsch supplier. And whether stepping into the place for the first or the 100th time, you get the sense it's as timeless as the pillow-soft whipped cream that tops Jungbauer's cakes. Known to friends and customers as J.J., Jungbauer is one of those appealing personalities you might find in a New Yorker profile. He's immediately real, in a larger-than-life way, sort of like a favorite uncle or at least the uncle you always wished you'd had. He takes the time to tell you stories about coming to the United States. He offers his point of view, sweetened by soul-pleasing cakes and cookies and hot coffee.
Long before he became known as J.J. or had even heard of Indiana, he was a young boy growing up in the small city of Karlsruhe in Southwestern Germany, west of Bavaria near the border with France. Here he began learning his trade before taking his first professional job in Munich as a pastry chef. He later worked on a cruise ship, where he met a New York nightclub owner who offered the young chef a job if he ever wanted to move to the United States. And that's exactly what Jungbauer did. He worked in New York before joining the U.s. Army in the early 1960s, which eventually resulted in a finance assignment at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indianapolis. Fortunately for lovers of pfeffernuesse and springerle cookies, that career move didn't last long. When the numbers job grew state, Jungbauer requested a new position in the kitchen, where he knew he could make a bigger impact.
The impact would be big, sparked by a specialty cake Jungbauer crafted for a high ranking officer on the occasion of a special military event. The result was immediate attention, including coverage in The Indianapolis Star, which featured Jungbauer and gave him his first taste of local media stardom. He eventually earned five promotions - reaching the rank of Specialist 5 in a few years - as well as an Army commendation medal for baking excellence. Despite completing his military service and making a name for himself, Jungbauer resisted in allure of returning to New York. He decided instead to stay in Indiana and open a business. The idea began humbly and evolved into the enterprise Jungbauer's fans now know as the Heidelberg Haus.
Jungbauer set up shop in 1968 near the current location on Pendleton Pike. He began with space purchased from a butcher who was going out of business. From the beginning, when he hung out his sign reading "German bakery opening soon," he decided to focus squarely on old-world European pastries made from scratch. He also wanted to offer diners, a small menu of German care food. To this day, diners who stop by for lunch enjoy locally made sausage platters featuring the charcuterie of Claus Muth from Claus' German Sausage and Meats Market in Fountain Square, and homemade sides such as traditional German potato salad. If they're extra lucky, they may get a chance to chat with Jungbauer's wife Gabi, or their daughter Angie, who help run the place. But without a doubt, because Jungbauer should be named one day to the German Pastry Chef Hall of Fame (and really, if there isn't such a thing yet, someone ought to construct one, a visit to Heidelberg Haus isn't complete without an order of fresh Danish, anise-tinged springerle cookies available before Christmas, a slice of Black Forest cherry cake or a box of pastries. As a pastry chef steeped in tradition, Jungbauer does it right. That's why his work tastes so good. "I refuse to change my ways, " he says.
He's not a small man - neither in stature nor personality. Jungbauer's immediate appeal includes his friendly smile, massive eyebrows that peek from under a baker's toque, and a bracing handshake to welcome guests. Most Heidelberg Haus visitors, however, can be forgiven if they never notice those things. Stepping into the place means being swept into a Teutonic daydream. A dizzying collection of some 10,000 items - including German-language videos, imported foods, authentic German breads and countless beer steins - can captivate a shopper for hours. And that might not even allow enough time for the hundreds of vintage photos, elaborately colored wall murals, vintage gartenzwerge (garden gnomes) and zany cuckoo clocks that beautify seemingly every inch of the shop's shelves and walls. Jungbauer's generosity is simply another dimension of Heidelberg Haus. When he makes too many danishes and other treats, he hands out the excess to local police officers and homeless guests. Of course, that's not terribly surprising for a man who mentions in passing that he operated his retail trade "on the honor system" for 30 years. Jungbauer speaks freely as an artisan who's most proud of his craft. He doesn't believe in cutting corners. He doesn't use margarine or prepared dough. In addition to the artisan-quality desserts, he crafts elaborate wedding cakes for local couples. Fortunately for Jungbauer and his legions of customers, son-in-law Charlie Corkwell is gradually taking the reigns ad guiding the kitchen's operations as the master slows down. It's no wonder Heidelberg Haus draws so many locals for return visits along with out-of-town travelers. You won't find its pastries in other retail channels. Jungbauer simply doesn't take wholesale orders. "The business has always been small, and that has been a good decision," he insists. "All I ever wanted was bakery and a German cafe. And that worked out just fine. But I ma cutting back. You can only work so hard."

5 FOR CHEF JUNGBAUER
Favorite Indianapolis restaurants. Deeter's and The Glass Chimney, when under Dieter Puska's ownership, and Red Lobster
Favorite music. Country (he recalls hearing Johnny Cash's 1960's hit "Ring of Fire" after moving to the U.S.) and traditional German folk styles, including oom-pah music. Jungbauer once hosted a local radio show spotlighting German music.
Favorite tool. Jungbauer takes special pride in his vintage solid-wood springerle cookie molds, some of which date back to the mid-19th century. He uses them to produce orders before the Christmas holiday, when the cookies are customarily served.
Personal motto. "My philosophy, when I came to America, was to have a small bakery, a small home - really, the American dream."
Proudest achievements. Sticking with his belief that a successful life can be built on a foundation of handmade pastries, cookies and cakes.

' He's immediately real, in a larger-than-life way, sort of like a favorite uncle or at least the uncle you always wished you'd had.'

' All I ever wanted was a German Bakery and cafe. And that worked out just fine.'

Sunrise Cookbook
Recipes from the kitchens of Indianapolis Chefs and the WTHR family
2009

Chef Juergen Jungbauer from the Heidelberg Bakery and Cafe presents his Bavarian Chocolate souffle with Black Forest sabayon sauce.
Followed by recipes.

 

NPR - National Public Radio - WPR
1-Hour Life Interview - Here On Earth: Radio Without Borders
December 19, 2008
Interview by Jean Feraca
The Great Christmas Cookie Exchange

Juergen Jungbauer has been baking springerle and pfeffernuesse cookies at Heidelberg Haus in Indianapolis for forty years. But he is a hold-out. These days, he says, if you want real Christmas cookies you have to bake them at home. This hour on Here on Earth: Radio without Borders, join Jean Feraca and her guests for the great Christmas cookie exchange.
Juergen Jungbauer, proprietor of Heidelberg Haus, a German bakery in Indianapolis.

The Indianapolis Star
Germany: Springerle & Pfeffernuesse
December 10, 2008

When Heidelberg Haus owner Juergen Jungbauer opened his bakery 40 Years ago, who knew his holiday cookies would find so many fans? But since being featured on the Food Network's "Food Finds" program a couple years ago, Jungauer's anise-flavored sspringerle have provided an authentic taste of Germany to customers around the world. The cookies, which Jungbauer call 'a charm fro happiness," are made with molds that create raised designs. Springerle are $4.95 per half pound; or get a 2-pound combo with spicy pfeffernuesse cookies, another traditional German treat, for $19.80 (try them dipped in a sweet, spiced wine called Gluehwein.) A traditional Christmas and New Year's gift, the cookies are available only through the first of the year. Heidelberg Haus is located at 7625 Pendleton Pike; see www.heidelberghaus.com
picture

Nuvo Cityguides
Visit the Northeast Lawrence Township
Heidleberg Haus
June 30, 2008

More than a restaurant, it's a walk along the Rhine. The 14-item menu has been the same for years and revolves around authentic German sausage of all kinds, homemade potato salad and freshly made baked goods. The cafe doubles as a variety store where you can buy food items, knickknacks and an array of German merchandise.
1 picture

Indianapolis Women
Family Time at the Heidelberg Haus
Mix your food and fun at restaurants and activities around town
March 2008

By: Ladan Nekoomaran
Indianapolis offers a variety of options for a memorable afternoon or evening with the kids, from an afternoon bike ride at Eagle Creek Park to sharing some laughs over dinner. Even if you have picky eaters or overly atice toddlers, put on your swimsuit and dive in to the many choices.
East Side - Introduce the kids to a new culture and top off your bratwurst with a decadent slice of German-style cake at Heidelberg Haus.
1 picture of Cafe Heidelberg

City of Lawrence, Indiana
Office of the Mayor
December 8, 2008
Proclamation - Juergen Jungbauer Day

To all whom these presents may come, Greeting:
Whereas, Juergen Jungbauer ("JJ") and his wife Gabi established the Heidelberg Haus in 1968 in the City of Lawrence; and,
Whereas, Heidelberghaus has been featured in many local, national and international publications including a segment on the Food Network; and,
Whereas, Juergen Jungbauer's vision was to start a small family business where everyone can come and feel welcome, which he has accomplished, and over the years his small business has grown and expanded to 2- employees who help make it the unique and charming establishment in the City of Lawrence that we have all come to know and love: and,
Whereas, Juergen Jungbauer has touched lives over the past forty years with his warm smile and friendly conversation to the point many employees and customers consider the Heidelberg Haus to be their home away from home.
Now, Therefore, I, Paul Ricketts, Mayor of the City of Lawrence, Indiana, hereby proclaim Monday, December 8, 2008 as "Juergen Jungbauer and the Heidelberg Haus Day" in the City of Lawrence in recognition of the forty years of love, service, good food and exquisite pastries the residents of the City have enjoyed because of one man and his vision.
IN testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and cause to be affixed the seal of the City of Lawrence on this 8th day of December in the year 2008.
The proclamation is signed by Paul Ricketts, Mayor, City of Lawrence.

Lawrence Township City Council
George Keller Public Assembly Room
March 5, 2008

The Lawrence Common City Council invited Juergen Jungbauer to their monthly meeting to present him with the Citizen Recognition Award for 2008. The council praised the owner of the Heidelberg Bakery and his staff for over 40 years of community services and dedication to the betterment of Lawrence township. Mr. Juergen Jungbauer and his wife Gabi Jungbauer accepted the beautiful trophy award and Mr. Jungbauer recalled in his speach his dedication to good food and his love for the U.S., Indiana, Indianapolis, and last but not least the wonderful township of Lawrence. Hosted by Linda Treat.

Treasures of Indiana
Heidelberg Haus
2008 Coffee Table Book

For nearly 40 years, Heidelberg Haus has been surprising Indianapolis customers with its Old Country charms, thanks to Juergen Jungbauer and his wife, Gabi. Juergen, originally from Germany, opened a small cafe and pastry shop in 1968, then expanded several times to add imported gifts and European gourmet foods. He creates such confections as layered tortes and Black Forest cake with personalized touches for weddings or birthdays. Other specialties include the springerle cookie, a favorite German Christmas sweet with an anise flavor and embossed surface. Visitors to Heidelberg Haus can shop among an eclectic mix of German potato salad while surrounded by lovely old murals and walls line with German antiques and beer steins. The store contains a German Language Video Center, the only German media shop in the United States. Authentic gifts include suede lederhosen, nutcrackers and cuckoo clocks. You'll also find German newspapers and magazines, figurines and possibly a plush Wolperdinger, a mythical mountain creature. The Heidelberg Haus also has an antique bakery museum. This award-winning pastry shop has been featured on the Food Network show Food Finds for three consecutive years. Leave your passport at home and head to Heidelberg Haus.
Phone (317) 547-1230 www.heidelberghaus.com wwww.germanvideo.com

Indianapolis Star
Taste Events
Too Many Cooks
December 19, 2007

Today at 9:30 a.m. on WICR-FM (88.7) Public Radio's Fun & Informative Call-In Show about cooking & cuisine hosted by Patti Denton, Juergen Jungbauer of the Heidelberg Haus will talk about the German bakery's popular Christmas favorite, the springerle cookie and other holiday traditions.
1 picture of Black Forest Cake

Indianapolis Monthly
The Dish
December 11, 2007
Edited by Julia Spalding
Springerle Has Sprung

Hankering for an alternative and light holiday sweet? Now is the season to stop in at Heidelberg Haus (7625 Pendleton Pike, 547-1230) for some of baker and owner Juergen Jungbauer's special springerle cookies. Featured on the Food Network's Food Finds, these rarely made but dainty traditional German cookies are flavored with anise oil before being rolled out in antique molds to give them shapes of fruits, animals, and household objects. Larger ones are definitely pretty enough to be gifts? If you can get them home without nibbling on them? or even ornaments for the tree. These are best eaten fresh, but they also rank among the tastiest morning-tea accompaniment in dee verlt.

The Indianapolis Star
Spring for Springerle
November 28, 2007
First Bite: Jolene Ketzenberger

Licorice lovers, rejoice - it's time for springerles. Authentic springerle cookies, an anise flavored holiday treat with origins in German-speaking Europe (Bavaria, Austria, Switzerland), are available locally - but only for a limited time. I don't mean to sound like a late-night TV advertisement, but the festive holiday cookies really are a seasonal sweet, and anise fans out there know to snap them up now to enjoy later.
For the past 20 years, Benedictine Sister Theresine Will of Our Lady of Grace Monastery in Beech Grove has baked 450 dozen of the cookies each holiday season. Sister Theresine, and Evansville native who joined the religious community in 1948, is the oldest of 12 children and remembers taking turns mixing springerle dough for her mother. "My mom made many delicious cookies for Christmas," she said in a news release, "but her springerles were always a special treat.:
The cookies, which are decorated with designs that are pressed into the dough with special rolling pins or molds, are available at Shop Inn-spired, the gift shop of the monastery's Benedict Inn Retreat & Conference Center, 1402 Southern Ave., (317) 788-7581.
The cookies, often decorated with pastoral images of flowers, animals and harvest scenes, are soft when first baked, but soon become hard and crisp -- perfect for dunking in coffee. Many springerle fans, like Florida resident Joe Armbruster, who orders the cookies each year, remove them from their air-tight container so they'll quickly crisp up.
You also can find traditional springerles for $9 a pound at Heidelberg Haus German Bakery and Gift Shop, 7625 Pendleton Pike, (317) 547-1230. It get plenty of requests for the cookies, especially since being featured on the Food Network's "Food Finds" program a year ago. Heidelberg Haus' cookies are available at the bakery through Christmas; those with big orders are advised to call ahead. New this year - cherry-flavored Kirschwasser springerle.
Now all I need is a cup of coffee.

Indianapolis Star
October 28, 2007
Some Businesses Willing to Buy into Governor's Tax Plan (condensed)

Jeff Swiatek
3% cap might boost their tax burden, but they hope that level won't be necessary
Three business owners in Indianpolis area said they could live with the 3 percent cap on business property taxes, through it's more than some pay now...Juergen Jungbauer, owner of the Heidelberg Cafe Bakery & Gift Shop on Pendleton Pike on the city's Northeastside, said: "I could live with 3 percent. That would be about the same as I am paying now."
"I think it would work," he said of the governor's reform plan. "I just don't see any other way. You have to keep some property taxes."

Indianapolis INtake Magazine
Break out your lederhosen
August 2, 2007
By: Julie Cope Saetre

You can definitely do wurst than grabbing a bite at Heidelberg Haus. As a native Indy Eastsider and a woman of German descent (relatives on my mother's side include Remlers and Dieberts), I nursed a nagging sense of guilt that I had never once stopped by the venerable Heidelberg Haus Cafe. A staple on Pendleton Pike, Heidelberg Haus has held court among the ever-changing demographics of this busy thoroughfare since owners Juergen and Gabi Jungbauer opened the doors in 1968.
So off I went on a sunny Saturday afternoon, ready to immerse myself in the delights of German sausages, potato salad and pastries. My husband, Pete, a Heidelberg veteran, eagerly agreed to accompany me.
Not just a cafe - Inside the location's brick exterior (cheerfully painted with German landscapes), a triple threat awaits. The cafe is only part of this venture; a bakery and "German general store" also are in the Haus. Cafe customers sit at a small counter in the back of the center room or at a handful of tables scattered among three interconnected areas. Pete and I chose a small table set between a display of early-20th-century antique bakery items and a window lined with plastic gnomes. We didn't see a server, but Pete knew the drill and grabbed two hand-painted menu boards form the counter. Most of the 16 numbered offerings spotlight some sort of sausage - bratwurst, knockwurst, wuerstchen, fleischkaese, gulay and curry-wurst - although a wandering vegetarian will find a toasted cheese sandwich available. Many entrees pair with German potato salad, which also can be ordered as a side.
I went straight for No. 1 ($5.95), a single brat served with potato salad and a choice of rye bread or roll with butter. Pete kept the brat pack going by ordering No. 9. ($&.85), "Oktoberfest Brats" basically, my meal with an extra sausage added "for big appetites). OK, so we weren't feeling especially creative, but there's no beating a perfectly prepared brat, and these came darn close to the ideal.
Well done - Each arrived perfectly seared, with a crispy skin that snapped when we sliced into the sausages. Inside, the meat was hot and juicy. A bottle of brown mustard kept on the table added a decent dose of spice and had me reminiscing about the mother of all mustards, the one served with hot pretzels at the Rathskeller.
The vinegar-based potato salad was served warm and in generous portions, seasoned with pepper, accented by bacon bits and topped with a slice of hard-boiled egg. While we munched, I gazed at the numerous tchotchkes lining the walls and hanging from the ceiling: dangling ornaments, paper-doll presidents, ornate wedding cake toppers, framed articles and photos depicting notable political visitors from the past (Birch Bayh, Otis Bowen, Richard Nixon). The menu indicated that, for dessert, we should order directly from the bakery. So, sausages finished, we headed for the main room's glass counters filled with picturesque pastries, cookies and cakes.
Bakery beauties - I chose a slice of the intriguing poppy-seed cheesecake ($2.65). I noted that the top of the dessert did indeed sport a sprinkling of its namesake ingredient, but upon scooping up a forkful, I found the moist bottom layer of this goodie also incorporated poppy seeds, this time crushed and mixed with chocolate. Not a combination I would have thought to create, but the taste was pleasant indeed. Pete opted for a slice of chocolate/chocolate-chip cake ($2.65), featuring chocolate cake, frosting and chocolate-chip cake alternating for 10 densely packed layers of caloric goodness.
Service was admittedly spotty, most likely due to the small staff switching between bakery, kitchen and cashier duties. But the laid back attitude has its pluses. Where else in this document-everything world can you find a place that doesn't bother messing around with a paper check? "Just tell the cashier what you had," our server said. My take: if it wasn't recorded on paper, the calories don't count. So ring up an extra slice of cheesecake to go.
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Indianapolis Intake/Insight Weekly Magazine
Willkommen Gnome!
April 5, 2007
By: Jenny Elig
Strolling for gnomes

From the pages of fairytales and the depths of the Black Forest, garden gnomes are making themselves at homes.
As springtime continues to tighten its breezy grip around the Circle City, you might find yourself spending more time out in the garden. Believe us, this is time well spent just chillin' with your gnomies.
Garden gnomes (or dwarves) hail from germany, so we stopped off at the Heidelberg Haus for a lesson in gnomistory from Juergen "J.J." Jungbauer, Haus owner, gnome lover and Black Forest native.
"The garden dwarves are actually not that old," he said. "They are only 135- to 140-years old." But what are these little guys? Gnomes make plenty of appearances in fairytales; Jungbauer said they ward off bad vibes. In Germany, where garden space (and housing in general) is tight, the gnomes make a kitschy and colorful appearance in tiny backyards.
The Heidelberg Haus has seen tens of thousands of gnomes pass through its doors in its 39 years of existence. When Jungbauer was a kid, garden dwarves (or "gartenzwerge") were made of reddish-brown clay. The 1950s brought the introduction of plastic, upping the kitsch factor of gnome statues by adding a glossy, rubbery veneer. And, according to Jungbauer, "either you love them or you hate them."
Keeping in mind the variety of their poses (from zany to sweet to quite naughty), we love gneissic that. We adore them.
Gnome care and dwarf avengers - Jungbauer's gnomes don't wash themselves, you know. Anchored with steel poles, the dwarves sit in the sun and sometimes get slightly brown noses from the sun. Every year, if the gartenzwerge are looking a little ripe, Jungbauer washes them with bleach water and touches up the spray paint on the noses. "It's better to have a good looking dwarf than one who looks moldy," he said. "They usually come out really nice."
He's not the only one watching out for the gnomes. The French, the Italians and the Swiss go to extreme measures to protect garden dwarves, Jungbauer said. "The French have some people who kidnap them and set them free in the forest."

INDIANA CURIOSITIES
Your round-trip ticket to the wildest, wackiest, most outrageous people, places, and things the Hoosier State has to offer!
2007 Coffee Table Book, Page 7
By: Dick Wolfsie

For more than thirty years, people have stopped at the Heidelberg Cafe at 7625 Pendleton Pike in Indianapolis. Others have driven by the flamingo-pink building vowing to someday yield to their curiosity and venture inside.
Regulars know what to expect. It never changes. The Heidelberg is a bakery, a gift shop, a cafe, a restaurant, a video store, and a museum. And every inch of the place is a celebration of old Germany. Okay, there's a touch of Switzerland and Austria, too.
The owner is Juergen Jungbauer, known as J.J., a pint-sized pastry chef who packs a lot of personality and knows his whey around whipped cream.
J.J. studied in Europe and was a master pastry chef by the time he was sixteen. He came to the U.S. while he was still a teenager and opened the cafe in 1968. Today, people come from all over to sit at the counter or at the tiny tables and have a piece of kielbasa, or some mettwurst. If you don't know what mettwurst is, you really don't know what you are missing. And don't forget the hot German potato salad.
The big draw, of course, is J.J.'s pastry creations - authentic cakes and tortes made right in the back every day. The chef bristles at my inquiry about pies. "You want pies?" he says, "go to a pie shop." The Black Forest cake, with a ring of chocolate buttercream, is his most popular item, but he refused to sell to other restaurants. "I can't control the product," says J.J. "if they kept it in the fridge for a week with a catfish, what do you think it would taste like?"
The huge glass display cases in the store feature dozens of homebaked items, all of which can be purchased in individual slices for takeout. Once you've satisfied yoru sweet tooth, visit the bakery museum, featuring tools of the trade going back over a hundred years, including a coal oven and hand impements from the turn of the twentieth century. School kids like the museum. they like the chocolate fudge cake even better.
Inside you'll find German gifts, German food, German magazines, German candies, and German T-shirts. And all videos are rated G (for German, of course!) Call the Heidelberg Cafe at (317) 547-1230. You can go to their website, but it doesn't smell as good as the shop:
www.heidelberghaus.com or www.germanvideo.com

NPR - National Public Radio - WPR
1-Hour Life Interview - Here On Earth: Radio Without Borders
December 22, 2006
Interview by Jan Feraca
Ethnic Cookies

Anise Springerli, Bratzeli, Basil Leckerli and more. This hour on Here On Earth, Radio without Borders, Jean Feraca and her guest talk about ethnic cookies from Heidelberg Haus Bakery and New Glarus Bakery.
Juergen Jungbauer, proprietor of Heidelberg Haus, a German bakery in Indianapolis.

Bloomington Herald Times
December 6, 2006
'Tis the season for cookies
(condensed)
by Lynn Schwartzberg
H-T food columnist | lschwartzberg@heraldt.com
It's that time of year again. No, not shopping, gift wrapping or trimming the tree. It's cookie baking time. What's holiday time without the fragrant smells of baking? A home becomes instantly festive with the scent of cookies wafting through the air.
I visited Heidelberg Haus in Indianapolis recently. The charming business sells German gifts, foods, cookies, and pastries. You can also eat an authentic German lunch in the small cafe. Heidelberg Haus is famous for springerle cookies. These delicious cookies are scented with anise seed and shaped in carved wooden molds, some more than 100 years old. Springerle look beautiful on a cookie plate, and are delicious to eat. The larger cookies can also be used as decorations. Why not make your own pfeffernusse and lebkuchen then take a drive to Heidelberg Haus for a taste of Germany. Be sure to meet owner Juergen Jungbauer who will proudly show you his collection of antique cookie molds.

The Indianapolis Star
The Buzz Page
Busy Heidelberg Haus needs photos back
November 27, 2006

There's some good and bad news at Heidelberg Haus. The German bakery, cafe and gift shop at 7625 Pendleton Pike is in the midst of it "springerle" cookie explosion. Owner Juergen Jungbauer said the shortening-free cookies made with antique wooden cookie molds are produced from mid-November until the second week of January. Not everyone likes the anise-laced treat, but it's a sentimental favorite to many. The old-fashioned holiday treat is popular with locals, but Jungbauer ships a lot of cookies this time of year. After Heidelberg Haus was featured on the Food Network this past weekend, he expects to be inundated with orders. Head over www.heidelberghaus.com to learn more about the cookie, the bakery and the cafe, which has been in operation for 38 years. That's the good news.
The bad news involves the book of wedding cake photos someone swiped a few weeks ago during a wedding cake consultation. Jungbauer said he's used to people sneaking off with one or two photos of the wedding cakes as brides-to-be consider different cake options, but losing the whole book makes it hard for everyone. Have a heart and return the photos, please.

 

The Indianapolis Star
Friday, November 24, 2006
Sweets plus
Heidelberg Haus Evokes German Cafe
By: Traci Cumbay

People come to the singularly appointed Heidelberghouse for the pastries, kitsch factor and conversation, some staying several hours on a regular basis to talk with their fellow regulars. Whatever the draw, they come, and then come back. "nice a person comes in the front door, we have'em," owner Jurgen Jungbauer said. "They're gonna tell their friends, 'You gotta see that place.' Your really do.
The food - Pastry chef Jungbauer and his wife, Gabi, created Heidelberg House to resemble a cafe in Germany: "A small-town bakery," he said. "A place to have some coffee and cake, with a little something for the people who don't want sweets." The menu of little somethings hasn't changed since the cafe opened 38 years ago, and covers the gamut of cuisine from bratwurst to frankfurter. In between are knackwurst, weisswurst and other wursts. Dishes are served with warm German potato salad and a couple slices of lightly flavored sourdough rye.
I sampled the bratwurst ($7.45 for two), kielbasa ($7.45) and kassler rippchen ($7.45), a smoked pork chop. I'd order any of it again, and often. The bratwurst was lightly grilled and mild, the kielbasa dense and smoky. The pork chop was thick-sliced, moist and salty. Passing on sweets at Heidelberg Haus is out of the question. The center of he store holds a bakery case that shows off Jungbauer's artful creations for the day, most of them German but with some concessions to the American tongue. Black Forest cherry cake ($2.95 a slice) is the cafe's calling card. It's a tall, liqueur heavy chocolate cake layered with whipped cream (a quart in each cake, Jungbauer told me!) and cherries.
The service - Tables at Heidelberg Haus feel hidden among the collectibles that fill the place, and the service can underscore that tucked-away feeling. Impatient sorts do best at the counter, where attention is ample and coffee refills snappy.
The atmosphere - The allure of the place has as much to do with the atmosphere as Jungbauer's adroitly engineered sweets. Heidelberg Haus also is a market, with all manner of European candy and mostly German knick-knacks strewn around the store on shelves, atop antique stoves, even hanging from the ceiling. A mural on the building's exterior greets customers and every available space inside the restaurant also has been jazzed up by colorful countryside scenes. Music vacillates from polka to contemporary German club tunes.
Diners tend to linger, Jungbauer told me, and energetic debates are likely to break out among any of the groups of regulars who come to chew on the events of the day. Jungbauer smiles over it all, milling among friends in his "happy little cafe."
The price - Three lunches and a small sampling of pastries cost $42, including tip. Given the heft of our to-go containers, the meal was a smashing bargain.
Nest time - I'll be slipping in again to try the Springerle cookies, a seasonal offering at Heidelberg Haus (mid-November through mid-January), and I'll be sure to do it when I have time enough for the extensive browsing the place demands.

2 picture
Picture 1: There are no doughnuts at this bakery, but no end of German pastries. The selection changes daily.
Picture 2: Oktoberfest bratwursts are for big appetites; they're served with potato salad and bread and butter ($6.95) at Heidelberg Haus.
Location 7625 Pendleton Pike. Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, 22 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. No reservations. Information: (317) 547-1230, www.heidelberghaus.com

The Indianapolis Star
Stein ways
October 4, 2006
By Terry Sowka

It's time to say "Prost" - cheers in German - and celebrate Oktoberbest. The annual festival provides a great excuse to raise a toast with German beer and prepare some easy German foods.
The Oktoberfest tradition started in 1810 to celebrate the marriage of Bavaria's Crown Prince Ludwig and the Saxon princess Theresa. The royal family invited the people of Munich for free beer and a horse race; 40,000 people showed up to join in the nuptial celebration. Today, the event continues to draw thousands each fall to Munich.
Convert your backyard or deck to a biergarten, cook up some knackwurst and sauerkraut, and hoist a Bavarian flag. Play some German music and lift a stein to autumn. Lederhosen and dirndl skirts are optional.
MUGS AND GLASSES
Go traditional with an ornate German beer stein (front), $68.75, or Munich Oktoberfest stein (right), $74.50, at Heidelberg Haus, 7625 Pendleton Pike. The German shop also sells German CDs and imported groceries, from mustards to spaetzle noodles. For that perfect weissbier - perhaps with a slice of lemon on top - use an 18-ounce beer glass, $18.75, also at Heidelberg Haus .German Beer coasters, 30 cents each, Heidelberg Haus.
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Intake
Step up to the plate. Indianapolis most favorite restaurants
March 16, 2006

Heidelberg Haus: 7625 Pendleton Pike, 317-547-1230. Juergen Jungbauer's surreal life egan in Germany, where he apprenticed to be a baker from the age of 13. Jungbauer emigrated to California as a teen and was drafted by the U.S. Army where he became a decorated cake and pastry chef. His final commission was at Fort Benjamin Harrison, and when the baker decommissioned the took over a vacant bakery on Pendleton Pike and opened Heidelberg Haus. Smoked sausages, potato salad and a roll are a hearty lunch, but it's not complete without an authentic Danish or a slice of Black Forest cake. The cafe haus is a small gift shop if you are in the market for stein or "happiness is drinking German Beer" T-shirt.
What to try: Curry wurst. Newest addition the the menu features two sausages covered in curry ketchup and served with German rye breatd and butter. Recommended side: German potato salad.
What to know: Reservations accepted. MC/V/D. Carryout, private meeting rooms, very casual attire.
When to go: 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays trough Fridays, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays.
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Wind it up and watch it go - Gift ideas from the Heidelberg Gift Shop Story by Michelle Pemberton
What is it? Tin windup Roby Robot, a reproduction of Yonezawa's robot from the 1960s.
What's the buzz? Robot's are friggin' cool! This super sweet reproduction of the mechanical sparkling Robby Robot made in Japan by Yonezawa in the early 1960s stands 9 inches tall. This collectable tin toy winds up, and has 'extreme" tiny sparking action. He also walks, and there can be no doubt that the design of the original toy created by Yonezawa as well as the reproduction where based on Robby from "Forbidden Planet," staring Leslie Nielsen, possibly the best science-fiction move of the 1950s.
Cost: $24 at Heidelberg Haus, 7625 Pendleton Pike
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INTAKE
Thursday March 2, 2006
By: Jen Huber

From the parking lot, you can tell the Heidelberg Haus is different. The colorful mural on the side of the building beckons hungry souls to enter.
THE MOOD: Friend Jason Kahl and I met at Heidelberg after work one night to sample some German cuisine and try some of the restaurant's well-known dessert. Heidelberg has been open since 1968, and it does good business. Besides the German bakery, Heidelberg sells German imports such as figurines, cuckoo clocks, nutcrackers, lederhosen, jewelry, pewter items, stuffed animals, placemats and other odds and ends. The Haus even has a German grocery store with dozens of intriguing items. Waiting for our table gave us time to wander through the small aisles and gawk.
THE FOOD: We found a table squeezed between a section of German language videos and an assortment of garden gnomes. Even while seated, we still have plenty to look at. The menu features 15 kinds of German meals, all for less than $7 each. I ordered a German-style bratwurst ($5.70) and was very pleased. The brat held great flavor inside and wasn't tough or overcooked. Home-made German potato salad came with it, along with a large slice of fresh bread. The warm potato salad was great, and even though it didn't look like much food I was full by the end. Kahl ordered the farmer's brat ($6.45), two fried sausages had just enough heat for him, and he liked the accompanying potato salad and bread. Since Heidelberghouse is known for desserts, we had to try one. Unfortunately, it was the end of the day, so our selection was diminished. The apple cheesecake was gone, but we each had a slice of the Black Forest cake ($2.65), a multi layered chocolate delight with mousse, cake, whipped cream, and sprinkles. Even though the cake was mostly frozen, it as still filling and rich. "It certainly didn't stop me from finishing it," Kahl said. We took home a couple of flaky, blueberry-filled pastries to have for breakfast and left at closing time.
THE DRINKS: I had a brewed ice tea ($1.39) and Kahl had water.
THE DAMAGE: Heidelberg Haus is definitely a quirky place to visit. But besides the eclectic atmosphere, the food is well prepared, the bakery is excellent and welcoming. The staff can answer questions about the food, merchandise and anything you need to know about Germany.
Picture 1: Owner Jurgen L. Jungbauer holds a slice of his black forest cake, $ 29.95 a 10-inch cake, or $ 2.65 a slice
Picture 2: Warm welcome for all
Picture 3: German style lighting adds to the German decor

Reid Duffy's Guide to Indiana's Favorite Restaurants
2006
Updated Edition Reid Duffy

Those making their first visit to Heidelberg Cafe for a hearty German lunch may find themselves leaving the premises an hour or two later, having forgotten to eat, but loaded down with figurines, stuffed animals, flags, knickknacks, German pastries, candies, canned goods, and all manner of German videos. For Heidelberg Cafe has been Indy's one-stop shopping center for all things German since it was fashioned together as the Heidelberg Haus in northeast Indy by German-born Juergen and Gabi Jungbauer in 1968, and expanded many times over. The shelves are stocked and stuffed with a colorful array of imported German and European gift items and imported foods, candies, spices, and seasonings, and no less than twenty-four hundred German videos to rent. Juergen Jungbauer's primary fame and acclaim has been achieved as a pastry chef, know for his high-rise wedding and celebratory cakes, including one shaped like the Eiffel Tower, with his most enticing efforts showcased in display cases for immediate or home consumption: German chocolate and Black Forest cherry cakes; apple and fruit strudels and meringues; cheesecakes and tortes; a full array of pasties, Danishes, croissants, and rolls; cinnamon raison bread; rye, Vienna, and French breads. The cafe is the most modes affair, consisting of a counter and cafe tables scattered about the premises at which to commune and nosh with a menu offering an array of German sausages and smoked pork chops, adorned with homemade potato salad and fresh rye bread, offering further justification for its legion of fans just to hang out at the Heidelberg. A sign attached to the entrance of the store on Pendleton Pike proclaims, "On this site in 1897, nothing happened.? but on this site in 1968, a legend was born.

 

Indianapolis Herald Weekly
Friday August 26, 2005
Dining at Pendleton Pike independent gems
By: Steve Douglous

Drive along Pendleton Pike and you'll be aware of the strip malls, fast food drive throughs and chain restaurants. If you've been in one, you've been in them all. But if you're hungry not just or food, but for a unique and esthetically pleasing experience, it's getting harder and harder to satisfy that hunger. But take heart. There are some little gems along the Pike that are worth looking for. Here are three that are easy to find.
The Heidelberg Haus has been open for 38 years. Decorated with charming murals inside and outside by local artist Billy Jon Rainbow, even the drinking fountain is decorated. Heidelberg is sort of a bakery, cafe, museum, boutique and video store. You could spend hours just wondering around looking through the nooks and crannies of the Haus. Filled with German gifts, curios, candy, candles, records, videos, and magazines, the place reflects the eclectic taste of baker-proprietor Juergen Jungbauer.
"J.J." as he is known to his friends and customers is one of those people who loves what he is doing and is joy to talk to. Standing in front of his brag wall with it's pictures and awards from his many notable customers, he is understandably proud of his wonderful business. " I got the idea from an old fashion drugstore, they didn't sell just drugs" say "J.J." They sold all kinds of things that you find to walk by in order to get to the druggist in the back.
"Back in 1968, I was at Fort Ben, and I saw that a bakery was needed after Paul's bakery closed" says J.J. Despite my wife's careful attention I managed to sneak a couple of J.J.'s wonderful cookies. No wonder it has a national reputation. The Heidelberg Cafe also features German style lunches with smoked pork chops, sausages and German potato salad. So, pay a call on J.J. and sample his incredible food.
picture 1: Heidelberg bakery counter is yummy
Picture 2: Cafe Heidelberg mural painted over 25 years ago by a local artist is still a sight to see.
Picture 3: "J.J." from the Heidelberg admiring his mural painted door, only one of many.

Indianapolis Monthly
Best Restaurants -Cheap Eats - Heidelberg Haus
By Christine Speer

May 2005
Against a tumultous backdrop of start-ups and fall-downs, most of the city's dinner hotspots managed to shine on - some by embracing the consistency that has long made them great, others by concocting inventive new ways to court our cravings. Dig in.

German: Patron seat themselves at this gift shop, bakery and diner lined floor-to-ceiling with gewgaws. Try the kassler rippchen, a smoky-flavored pork chop, and don't forget a piece of rich Heidelberg cake. Breakfast and lunch daily. 7625 Pendleton Pike, 547-1230 W $.

Indianapolis Star
March 28, 2005
A World of Treats
Eager amateur tasters rate candies and crunchy snacks from many lands
Abe Aamidor

It's a question philosophers long have asked: What separates humans from the lower species? Before today, no one has come up with the obvious answer - it's candy. Name a country or region of the world, sprinkle a little sugar on it, and voila - you will find a distinctive candy there.
In Germany, they go nuts over marzipan, a mixture of ground almonds and sugar that is believed to have Middle Eastern origins, and which was introduced into Europe around the 13th century and later to the New World.
Angi Corkwell is manager of Cafe Heidelberg at 7625 Pendleton Pike, which her father, Juergen Jungbauer, founded 36 years ago. A 2.6-ounce bar of genuine imported Niederegger Lubeck Marzipan from Germany sells for $5.90. Corkwell can give a guided tour of all the chocolates, candies and pastries in her dad's shop. "Oh, yes," she said. "I was raised in the store."

Indianapolis Star
Toddler's food play is no big deal

Kinder Bueno
Country of Origin: Several plants in Europe

March 1, 2005?
What is it: Chocolate-covered Hazelnut cream wafer.
Price: About $1.60.
Pro: Good balance of creamy texture and chocolate taste; some crunch to it, too.
Con: Chocolate was too "light" for some tastes.
Verdict: This is the chocolate bar that untied Europe, so it's worth a look.
Buy at: Cafe Heidelberg, 7625 Pendleton Pike, Indianapolis

NEUE PRESSE
2. Februar 2005
By Susanne Thomas

Das Heidelberg-Haus in Indianapolis: Juergen Jungbauer im "Foodnetwork"
Genau vor 47 Jahren absolvierte der junge Juergen Jungbauer aus Karlsruhe seine Lehre in der beruehmten Hofkonditorei Walter Schwarz, in Karlsruhe. Als der Lehrbub seine Lehre antrat haette er nie gedacht, dass das Springerlerezept seines Lehrherrn einmal das Tagesgespraech in ganz Amerika werden sollte.
Der heute 62-jaehrige Konditor, der sein deutsches Cafe und Baeckerei seit 37 Jahren in Indianaposlis (Indiana) betreibt, wurde naemlich auf ganz besondere Weise geehrt. Die beruehmte amerikanische Kabel- und Satelitenstation Foodnetwork hatte sich entschieden, eine Reportage ueber das bekannte Geschaeft auszustrahlen.
Eines Tages kamen dann die Produzenten mit ihrem grossen Lastwagen voller Kameras und Filmzubehoer nach Indianapolis. Ueber neun Stunden verbrachten der Regiseur, Kamera- und Tonmann im Heidelberg Haus. Aus dem Material dieser neun Stunden wurde ein 10 minuetiger Report hergestellt. Die Sendung wurde im anfang Dezember 2004 gleich viermal ausgestrahlt. "Food Finds" wird nach Angaben der Foodnetwork, wird in 85 Laendern ausgestrahlt und von 75 millionen Menschen gesehen.
In einer einstuendigen Weihnachtssendung wurden fuenf bemerkenswerte Firmen aus ganz Amerika vorgestellt. Gezeigt wurden neben dem Heidelberghaus weihnachtliche Themen vom Hexenhaeuschen bis zum Marsh Mellow und besonders das Zuckernaschwerk wurde dem Publikum vorgestellt.
Juergen Jungbauers Backmuseum und seine grosse Sammlung von altdeutschen Springerle Formen wurde besonders hervorgehoben. Eines seiner wertvollsten Stuecke ist ein Springerlemodel das angeblich fuer den Fuersten Friedrich 1 von Baden (1826-1907) in 1866 geschnitzt und benutzt wurde. Das Holzmodel wurde in den 60er Jahren von Juergen aus Privatbesitz erworben und zeigt neben dem Portrait des Fuersten auch noch das Stadtwappen der Stadt Karlsruhe, eine Muenze und eine Blume.
Nach Ausstrahlung der Sendung war in der Backstube der Teufel los. Die handgemachten Springerle erzeugten eine grosse Nachfrage. Besonders interessiert waren Leute die schon seit vielen Jahren keine Springerle zum Kaufen finden konnten. Tagelang war die Telefonleitung des Heidelberghauses mit Anrufen und Bestellungen aus ganze Amerika und andere Laender blockiert.
Wie sich heraustellte hat die Tradition des leckeren Anisgebaecks in Amerika einen hohen sentimentalen Wert wie sich aus Emails und Anrufen an Juergen ergab. Es scheint dass das Familienrezept fuer das Springerle mit dem Dahinscheiden der Mutter oder Oma oftmals verlorenging.
Das Heidelberghaus ist eine bekannte und sehr beliebte Einkaufsquelle fuer alles was deutsch ist. Neben Lebensmitteln, Geschenken, deutschen Zeitschriften, CDs und etc., hat das Heidelberghaus schon seit 20 Jahren auch eines der groessten deutschen Videofilmvertriebe und verleih in den Staaten. www.germanvideo.com
Die Nachfrage nach den Springerle war so ueberwaeltigend das der klevere Konditor eine eigene Website aufbaute (www.heidelberghaus.com) um das Telefon zu entlasten. Seine Frau Gabi, alle vier seiner Toechter und etliche Verwandte wurden eingespannt um die leckere Ware mit der Post schnell zu versenden. Juergen, der sich so langsam nach dem Ruhestand sehnte, muss nun mehr denn je arbeiten. Andere Indianapolis Fernseh- und Radiostationen wollen nun auch wissen was im Heidelberg Haus vorgeht und bringen live Reportagen aus dem popularen Cafe.
Die Publizitaet nimmt der 62-jaehrige Badener gelassen hin. Zum Glueck backt er die Springerle nur zur Weihnachtszeit. Nun kann er sich wieder seinen anderen Backwaren widmen. ..
3 pictures

NORDAMERIKANISCHE WOCHEN-POST
Samstag, 22. Januar 2005
Aus allen Staaten
by Susanne Thomas

Heidelberg Haus nicht nur ein Importgeschaeft
Vor 47 Jahren absolvierte der junge Jurgen Jungbauer aus Karlsruhe seine Lehre in der beruehmten Hofkonditorei Walter Schwarz, in Karlsruhe. Als der Lehrbub seine Lehre antrat haette er nie gedacht, dass das Springerlerezept seines Lehrherrn einmal das Tagesgespraech in ganz Amerika werden sollte.
Der heute 62-jaehrige Konditor, der sein deutsches Cafe und Baeckerei seit 37 Jahren in Indianaposlis, Indiana in den USA betreibt, wurde naemlich auf ganz besondere Weise geehrt. Die beruehmte amerikanische Kabel- und Satelitenstation Foodnetwork hatte sich entschieden eine Reportage ueber das bekannte Geschaeft auszustrahlen. Eines Tages kamen die Produzenten mit ihrem grossen Lastwagen voller Kameras und Filmzubehoer im Heidelberg Haus Cafe in Indianapolis an. Ueber 9 Stunden verbrachten der Regiseur, Kamera- und Tonmann im Heidelberg Haus Cafe. Aus dem Material dieser 9 Stunden wurde ein 10 minuetiger Report hergestellt. Die Sendung wurde im anfang Dezember 2004 gleich viermal ausgestrahlt. Food Finds, auf deutsch "Essenfinden", wird nach Angaben der Foodnetwork, wird in 85 Laendern ausgestrahlt und von 75 millionen Menschen gesehen.
In einer einstuendigen special Weihnachtssendung wurden 5 bemerkenswerte Firmen aus ganz Amerika vorgestellt. Gezeigt wurden neben dem Heidelberghaus weihnachtliche Themen von Hexenhaeuschen bis zum Marsh Mellow und besonders das Zuckernaschwerk wurde dem Publikum vorgestellt. Juergen Jungbauers Backmuseum und seine grosse Sammlung von altdeutschen Springerle Formen wurde besonders hervorgehoben. Eines seiner wertvollsten Stuecke ist ein Springerlemodel das angeblich fuer den Fuersten Friedrich 1 von Baden (1826-1907) in 1866 geschnitzt und benutzt wurde. Das Holzmodel wurde in den 60er Jahren von Juergen aus Privatbesitz erworben und zeigt neben dem Portrait des Fuersten auch noch das Stadtwappen der Stadt Karlsruhe, eine Muenze und eine Blume.
Nach Ausstrahlung der Sendung war in der Backstube der Teufel los. Die handgemachten Springerle erzeugten eine grosse Nachfrage. Besonders interessiert waren Leute die schon seit vielen Jahren keine Springerle zum Kaufen finden konnten. Tagelang war die Telefonleitung des Heidelberghauses mit Anrufen und Bestellungen aus ganze Amerika und andere Laender blockiert.
Wie sich heraustellte hat die Tradition des leckeren Anisgebaecks in Amerika einen hohen sentimentalen Wert wie sich aus Emails und Anrufen an Juergen ergab. Es scheint dass das Familienrezept fuer das Springerle mit dem Dahinscheiden der Mutter oder Oma oftmals verlorenging, fuer hunderte von deutsch amerikaner.
Das Heidelberghaus ist eine bekannte und sehr beliebte Einkaufsquelle fuer alles was deutsch ist. Neben Lebensmitteln, Geschenken, deutschen Zeitschriften, CDs und etc., hat das Heidelberghaus schon seit 20 Jahren auch eines der groessten deutschen Videofilmvertriebe und verleih in den Staaten. www.germanvideo.com
Die Nachfrage nach den Springerle war so ueberwaeltigend das der clevere Konditor eine eigene Website aufbaute (www.heidelberghaus.com) um das Telefon zu entlasten. Seine Frau Gabi, alle vier seiner Toechter und etliche Verwandte wurden eingespannt um die leckere Ware mit der Post schnell zu versenden. Juergen, der sich so langsam nach dem Ruhestand sehnte, muss nun mehr denn je arbeiten. Andere Indianapolis Fernseh- und Radiostationen wollen nun auch wissen was im Heidelberg Haus vorgeht und bringen live Reportagen aus dem popularen Cafe. Die Publizitaet nimmt der nun brigande 62-jaehrige Badener gelassen hin. Zum glueck baeckt er die Springerle nur zur Weihnachtszeit. Nun kann er sich wieder seinen anderen Backwaren widmen.
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BADISCHE NEUESTE NACHRICHTEN, Karlsruhe, Germany
German Newspaper
Januar 2005
Carina Jock

Mit Springerle Amerika erobert
Karlsruher Konditor macht Karriere im "Land der unbegrenzten Moeglichkeiten"
Es gibt Menschen, die zieht es in die Fremde. Sie lieben den Nervenkitzel des Neuen und Ungewissen, haben einfach nur Fernweh oder erhoffen sich in einem Land weit weg von der Heimat ein besseres Leben. Auch den Karlsruher Konditor Juergen Jungbauer packte schon in jungen Jahren die Abenteuerlust. Dass er jedoch eines Tages in Indianapolis im US-Staat Indiana sesshaft und mit seinem "Heidelberghaus" ein beruehmter Mann werden wuerde, haette er damals wohl nicht zu traeumen gewagt.
"Ich bin einige Zeit durch Deutschland gereist", berichtet der heute 62-jaehrige Jungbauer von seiner Taetigkeit nach dem Abschluss seiner Lehre in der Hofkonditorei Walter Schwarz in der Karlstrasse. 1962 habe er dann in Hamburg auf der "Hanseatic" angeheuert, wo er als zweiter Mann des Zuckerhandwerks in der Kombuese sein Koennen bewies. Eines Tages lernte Jungbauer dann den Fahrgast Carl Hoppl kennen, der ihm eine Stelle in seinem Restaurant in New York anbot. 1963 ging der damals 20-jaehrige Karlsruher schliesslich in der amerikanischen Metropole an Land, ohne auch nur ein einziges Wort Englisch zu sprechen. Doch der ehrgeizige Sohn eines Metzgermeisters, der als kleiner Bub im elterlichen Geschsaeft in der Amalienstrasse aushalf, schlug sich durch.
Er arbeitete als Konditor in weltberuehmten Hotels in Kalifornien und Arizona, bevor ihn die Army einzog und nach Indianapolis im Staate Indiana versetzte. Jungbauer absolvierte die Grundausbildung und hatte anschliessend das Glueck, dass er den Rest der Militaerzeit in der Kueche beziehungsweise Baeckerei der Kaserne ableisten durfte. Bei zahlreichen Wettbewerben, bei denen der Soldat auch mit zivilen Kollegen seiner Branche konkurrierte, heimste er begehrte Preise ein.
"Nach dem Ende des Wehrdienstes 1968 kam mir die Idee, in Indiana eine deutsche Baeckerei und Konditorei mit Cafe zu eroeffnen", erzaehlt der amerikanische Staatsbuerger. Viele deutsche Migranten haetten ihm geholfen, das Gebaeude am Pendleton Pike herzurichen, und ein deutscher Baeckermeister habe ihn ebenfalls unterstuetzt. Bis zum heutigen Tag wurde Jungbauers Unternehmen, dem er den Namen "Heidelberghaus" gab, viermal erweitert. Denn schon lange verkoestigt der gebuertige Karlsruher seine Kunden nicht nur mit Torten, Gebaeck und anderen suessen Leckereien. "Mein ganzes Geschaeft gleicht einem Antikladen", so der gelernte Konditor schmunzelnd, der zurzeit 20 Angestellte beschaeftigt. Die zahlreichen Kunden erhielten alles erdenkliche aus "good, old Germany"; von der Schokolade, ueber Niveacreme, deutsche Zeitschriften und CDs, bis hin zu Dirndln und allerlei Kitsch.
Dass sein "Heidelberghaus" inzwischen in ganz Amerika bekannt ist, hat Juergen Jungbauer unter anderem auch der Kabel- und Satellitenstation "Foodnetwork" zu verkanden. In einer einstuendigen Sendugn stellte sie naemlich fuenf bemerkenswerte Firmen aus den USA vor, darunter auch das "Heidelberghaus". Jungbauer wandte sich daraufhin an die BNN, um der Redaktion von dieser besonderen Ehre zu berichten. "Meine Springerle wurden besonders hervorgehoben", betont er. Nach der Ausstrahlung der Sendung sei in der Backstube der Teufel los gewesen; die Telefone haetten nicht still gestanden, weil Menschen aus ganz Amerika und anderen Laendern das handgemachte Anisgebaeck bestellen wollten. Den Trubel nimmt Jungbauer, der in seiner Freizeit gerne mit seinem Boot rausfaehrt oder Tanzen geht, jedoch gelassen hin. Und an die verdiente Rente denkt der 62-jaehrige auch noch nicht wirklich. Mindestens drei Jahre moechte er schon noch arbeiten.

NUVO
October 13 - 20, 2004
By Vicki Adams

Best German Restaurant
Cafe Heidelberg
Cafe Heidelberg is decently priced with a good selection and yummy cakes and pastries. And while you're waiting for your food you can browse their attached shop full of authentic knick-knacks and foods!

Intake
September 2-8, 2004
By Kimilo L. Martinez

Where to dine and shop when you're craving authentic German treats.
I'm not sure, but the Germans may well have invented the phrase: Eat, drink and be merry. If not, it's a motto that certainly seems to define the way Germans look at their meals, especially dinner.
According to Juergen L. Jungbauer, owner of German cafe, boutique and bakery Heidelberg Haus, supper is supposed to be a joyful occasion. Jungbauer, known as J.J. to most, regularly hosts dinner parties for about 16 people at his home, and said Oom Pa music, a little bit of singing and "having a good time" are ingredients for a good party.
Traditional dinner - According to Jungbauer, who is from the Black Forest region, a German dinner on any given day might feature some sort of goulash (beef stew) or rahmschnitzel, which is similar to beef stroganoff, with light salad, some vegetables and a staple German noodle spaetzle.
Katharina Kircher, 32, a native of northern Germany, says dinner for her is usually Abendbrot, or a "cold meal" usually featuring breads, cheese and cold cuts, with a light salad. Junita Kehrer, owner of Cafe Europa, suggests rouladen - a rolled steak, or roasted duck in the winter months. "It's what I love," Kehrer says.
As far as beverages go, beer or wine is the traditional choice, with sparkling mineral water or juice being served to those who don't prefer alcohol. In Germany, beer and wine are the key part of the culture, and children usually partake at the family table, which Jungbauer says allows children a way of socializing with their parents, learning to dance, sing, and generally enjoy life.
A formal touch - A more formal dinner might begin with alight soup, followed by a main course featuring a meat or fish with salad, vegetables and either rice, potatoes or noodles. Dessert, if served, would probably just be something light, like fresh fruit or pudding. The heavier pastries and cakes are usually reserved for Kaffeeklatsch, or coffee break, traditionally sometime between 3 and 4 p.m.
Where to buy - For specialty items and authentic regional ingredients try Heidelberg Haus: 7625 Pendleton Pike, (317) 547-1230. Mondays through Fridays 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturdays 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sundays 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. An assortment of marketplace items like German gravy mixes, noodles, spices and European beverages and condiments. If you don't feel like making dessert, you can pick up a Black Forest cake or some pudding mix.
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The Jackson County Banner
October 9, 2003
By Thomas J. Wright
Cafe Heidelberg Haus: Dining the Wright Way...

Last week Terri, T.J., Aaron, and I went to Indy to pick up our Formula One passes. We were all hungry and adventurous so I decided for a little place off the beaten path that was suggested to me by Angie Sibrel.
Heidelberg Haus is a little cafe on Pendleton Pike just east of I-465. This is where Frau (Angie) picks up breads and meat for her German breakfasts in her classes. We went past it the first time because it just doesn't stand out. The parking lot had a few cars but did not seem crowded. On the front wall was painted Heidelberg Castle.
When you step in the doorway you are whisked away to another part of the world. The cafe and bakery has been in Indianapolis since 1968 and owned by Gabi and Juergen Jungbauer. They can be found inside the cafe everyday working, waiting on customers, and answering questions. The tables are small and for two to four persons and scattered about the building. There is also a lunch counter.
As you walk about there are all sorts of items they have imported from Germany and surrounding countries. There are steins, clocks, candies, food items, and drinks (non-alcoholic). In one area they have 2,400 German videos for sale or rent and they even are able to convert VHS tape and DVD you may have purchased from Europe that does not play in your player to one that will work. They said they can convert while you wait. It only takes as long as the tape or DVD is long. They also have available VHS and DVD players that will play European standard tapes.
After walking around a bit we sat down. The waitress was friendly and courteous. The menu explained a cafe in Europe was a place to sit down, relax, read the paper, and chat or "Kaffeeklatsch" with old friends or meet with new ones. This is not a restaurant so the menu is limited. You are encouraged to share a table with a stranger as is the old European custom. I remember hearing this fro our guides whole traveling to Germany, Austria, and Switzerland and from Rick Steves in his "Europe Through The Back Door" series of TV shows and books.
Terri and Aaron ordered the Smoked Frankfurter platter, T.J. got the Kilbasa and me Oktoberfest Bratwurst platter. All came with potato salad, bread and butter. Here again the food was not like you get in other restaurants or cafes. The meat comes from a local German butcher and to those standards giving it a different but very tasty none the less. For dessert you wander to the Pastry Showcase and the different German delicacies are explained (there goes the diet again).
While we sat and ate, there was a steady stream of customers that came and went. Some were regulars because the waitress and Jungbauer's called them by name and socialized with them, others were newcomers like us. Greeted warmly just the same and always ready to answer any questions we had. Terri said the atmosphere of the place reminded her of Brock's in Brownstown.
The bill came to just a little over $12 per person, for meal, drink, dessert, and tip. I have spent more at Applebee's before. Good food, good service, at a reasonable price.
They boast a wide variety of imported gifts, gourmet food items, books, magazines, and newspapers. If you're ever in Indy this is a nice place to visit.
It is located at 7625 Pendleton Pike just east of I-465 on the south side of the road. They are open every day. The kitchens closes at 6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
The sign held by the pastry chief in the corner says it all, "Guten Tag y'all."

Indianapolis Monthly
The Food Issue
Where to find the Best
October 2003

Cafe Heidelberg Bakery, 7625 Pendleton Pike, 547-1230
Juergen Jungbauer started out as a pastry chef at the Fort Benjamin Harrison officers' club; when he left the Army in 1968, he opened his own bakery, cafe and gift shop in the adjacent Lawrence area. Today, he's still baking layered tortes, Danish, streussel kuchen and brotchen (literally "little bread," but delightful rolls in any language). The streussel kuchen features a different fruit every day, and the Black Forest torte, says 34-year employee Hildi in a heavy German accent, "is more authentic than you'd get in the old country." Jungbauer's pastries are beautiful to behold, especially the tortes: thin, moist layers of cake laced with fluffy butter cream and rich jam, encrusted with chopped nuts or candy sprinkles. If you stop in, linger at the cafe counter instead of getting carryout so you can enjoy the coffee klatsch of regulars who come in from all over central Indiana to solve the world's problems. Starting in October and running through Christmas, Jungbauer's special holiday cookies make their annual appearance (it's a good idea to place orders ahead).

Indianapolis Topics
Northeast Edition
September 25, 2003
By Rebecca Koenig
Lawrence celebrates Germanfest

Juergen Jungbauer dances with his daughter Angela to the tunes of Jay Fox & The Bavarian Showtime Band last Friday at Lawrence's Germanfest. Jungbauer is the owner of Cafe Heidelberg in Indianapolis. Ellen Miller of Indianapolis sells German pastries from Cafe Heidelberg at Germanfest. The German-style celebration was at Lawrence Park.
2 pictures

Indianapolis Monthly
Gourmet on a Budget
Dinner for under $25
25 Fabulous Food Finds
August 2003

Cafe Heidelberg Voted # 5
Dinner at Cafe Heidelberg is a full-immersion experience. Full of tchotchkes and Teutonic videos, the cafe offers real German food made by real Germans - set to an oompah soundtrack. Seat yourself at the counter for brats and smoked pork chops served with warm, vinegary potato salad, all in the $6 range. To finish, splurge on a hefty slice of one of the cafe's famous house made cakes (we love the cheesecake) - they're a bargain at $3 or less
7625 Pendleton Pike, 547-1230.

Indianapolis Topics Biz Buzz
April 17, 2003
Staff report
The landmark business Heidelberg House (hot dog house) in Lawrence has offered the same menu for 35 years, and nobody's getting tired of it. Authentic German-style bratwurst and the shop's famous Black Forest cake are top sellers after all these years at the place formerly known as Cafe Heidelberg. In fact, owners Juergen Jungbauer and wife, Gabi, say the only changes have been slight increases in prices due to inflation over the past three decades. But don't cal the place a restaurant. "We're like a European cafe in Germany," Juergen said. "We provide a little more of something hearty."
Having been in the baking business since the age 13, Juergen takes 46 years of expertise to create sweet savory treats like authentic Danish, German chocolate and hazelnut butter cream cakes. But tastes from the homeland don't stop there. He also makes a hot German potato salad complete with boiled red potatoes and a vinegar-and-bacon dressing. Diners can pop in for a smoked frankfurter and a helping of potato salad alongside bread and butter for $5.25. Check out the dessert showcase for 12 varieties of cakes and pastries. Fresh German hot rolls and bread - including personalized birthday and wedding cakes - also are available.
If the food alone doesn't make you feel like you've been transported to Germany, the ambiance certainly will. Behind the dining room counter clocks line the wall, displaying times of places around the globe. European chocolates are for sale. The walls are line with German antiques and newspaper clippings of Juergen's history as a pastry chef. Several photos displayed towering life sized wedding cakes he had created for governors and other friends and customers. Heidelberg Haus also offers a gift store with unique candles, T-shirts, figurines, candies, coasters and knickknacks.
Business hours are 8:30 a.m. - 7 p.m. Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information visit www.germanvideo.com/ service_pages/heidelberg.html or call (317) 547-1230.
Jungbauer spoke to Topics reporter Johanna Tran about his 35-year-old business.
Q Tell me how you came to open Heidelberg House in the first place.
A I got drafted in California. At the time, I was a pastry chef. Then I went on to basic training in Washington. They sent me here to Indianapolis to work at the center at Fort Harrison.
Then I spent two years here in the Army. While I was here in the Army, I had so much publicity and was honored by the military. They flew me to Washington. There was so much publicity, I decided that I might as well stay (in Lawrence). There was an empty bakery on Pendleton Pike. Next to the bakery, there was a butcher shop. I asked him if he would sell the store and he said yes. I had nobody here. I had no relatives or anything in America. There was nobody here. Most Europeans who come to America come to the East or West coast.
Q You were a pastry chef before serving in the Army? Tell me a little more about that.
A I began baking at 13. In Germany, when I was 14, you had to go to training. You used to train for three years. When you were 17, you had a trade. Anyone who wanted to be something like a blacksmith, hat to go to training. At 17, you were half-way good at it, then you tried to get better. I decided to travel about. I got stuck in America. I worked on German cruise ships as a pastry chef.
Q Why did you choose training to become skilled as a Pastry chef?
A My parents had a butcher and sausage-making shop. My dad said to stay with food, because people always have to eat no matter what. I just picked up the sweets field. We call it a pastry chef.
1 picture

The Indianapolis Star
Tuesday, January 7, 2003
A chance to say thanks
By John J. Sauhghnessy

At the Heidelberghaus a Vietnam veteran accidentally meets the man who saved his life 35 years ago.
After 35 years, Russell Baughman no longer expected to meet the person who saved his life. He definitely didn't expect to meet his personal hero when he recently started a job as a baker's assistant at the Cafe Heidelberg in Lawrence. Yet, when Baughman took a break from his kitchen work and walked to the front counter where a group of friends sat on silver stools solving the world's problems, Baughman notices a black baseball cap - a cap marked with the words "Vietnam Veteran" and a four-leaf clover insignia. "The Fourth Division, my division," Baughman said to himself. So Baughman, a veteran who now wears his long brown hair in a ponytail, introduced himself to Raymond Childress, the owner of the baseball cap who wears his thinning white hair trimmed neatly and closely to his ears.
Their conversation turned to a time that Newsweek magazine chronicle as "The Bloodiest Week." As they shared memories of that time, one thought became clear to Baughman. "You're the one who saved my life," he told Childress, who had fought with Baughman in a battle at Suoi Tre on March 21, 1967. Trying to put the scene between the two men in perspective, the Heidelberghouse's owner, Juergen Jungbauer, says: "You have 250 million people in America, and here these two guys find each other by accident after 35 years. It's incredible." Even more incredible to Baughman and Childress are the events of that day nearly 36 years ago. Childress was 41, one of the older men fighting in the U.S. Army in Vietnam. He had been drafted to serve in the Korean War and stayed on to make a career in the military. He was as tough and hardened as the coal he used to dig in the mines of West Virginia. Baughman was 20, one of five children raised by a single mother in a poverty-ridden section of Indianapolis called Brightwood. Even though he had been drafted to fight in Vietnam, the high school dropout saw the Army as a way to help his mother financially and escape his poor past. The two men's lives became forever intertwined at Suoi Tre, the site of a major base for the enemy North Vietnamese forces. "it was hell on Earth," Childress recalls. As "the bloodiest week" began, the United States poured more troops and helicopters into the area than it ever had. The Viet Cong responded with a fierce assault on March 21, including at least 650 rounds of mortar falling from the sky onto the American troops.
"We lost 20 to 30 men in my company in seconds," recalls Baughman, who served in the infantry. "The enemy was all around us." Childress nods and says, "I never saw so many people dead." An artillery chief, Childress also saw that most of the Americans' cannons had been destroyed, and their ammunition was on fire. That's when he started firing one of the remaining howitzers at the advancing enemy. "The only gunfire I could hear was his," Baughman recalls. "He fired continuously. I had my head down behind two or three sandbags. I was trying to get smaller and smaller. The enemy was still on the attack. I could hear them breathing." Explosions ripped around Childress as the enemy tried to know out his position. Twice he was struck by shrapnel, but he kept firing. The third time he was struck, he couldn't get up. "They hauled me out of there on a stretcher," Childress recalls. "I couldn't go no further I still have a piece of shrapnel, that's like a six-penny nail, near my spine."
Shortly after Childress' gun had gone silent, American tanks appeared from nowhere, rumbling through the jungle and devastating the enemy. Baughman believes they would have been too late if Childress hadn't made his stand. "It's a strange thing about heroes," Baughman says as he looks at Childress across a table at the Heidelberg. "A lot of times, it's the circumstances that dictate what someone does. He could have panicked, but he knew we were out there."
"I wouldn't be here if it wasn't for him. A lot of us would have died. I heard him get hit, but I never knew what happened to him after that." Childress was in and out of Army hospitals for 2 1/2 years following the battle. His heroics earned him the Distinguished Service Cross, the Army's second-highest honor, which is given "for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an armed enemy."
After getting his discharge in 1970, Childress and his first wife searched for a place to live. They had lived in 22 homes in his 21 years in the military. The West Virginia native chose Indianapolis simply because it seemed like a nice place to live.
As for Baughman, he returned to his hometown after serving his country. He says some of his adjustments have been rough, but now he views his life with hope. Both men know that 35 years seems like ancient history to many people. Yet that days is still fresh in Childress' memory, not because of his heroics but because of the horror that still haunts him. "Once you've been in combat and get shot up like I did, it changes you completely in mind and body," he says. "No medication will take care of that. My wife and I sleep in different rooms because I'm afraid I might hurt her. I'm up fighting those Viet Cong every night. You learn to live with it."
The memories of war affect Childress in another way. Every Monday morning, he uses his pickup truck to collect food, shoes, clothing and bedding for homeless veterans in Indianapolis. With every truckload, Childress figures his past and present meet.
"Someone has to look out for them," says the man who always has.
2 pictures
left picture text
Together again: Ray Childress (left) and Russell Baughman were in the same Vietnam battle in 1967. Childress held off the enemy, saving the life of Baughman and other soldiers. The two men met for the first time recently at a Lawrence restaurant.
Right picture text
War hero: "I wouldn't be here if it wasn't form him," says Russell Baughman, 55, (standing) of Ray Childress, 76.

Indianapolis Monthly
Carryout Cuisine the best meals to bring home
February 2002
By

Heidelberg Cafe
Text

Indianapolis Monthly
Kaffeeklatsch und Kitsch
October 2001
By Jodi Wright

Polka music, pastries and a German gift shop make for a fun mix at Heidelberg Haus.
If you notice a nickel sitting on a corner of the lunch-counter footrest at Heidelberg Haus, don't bother reaching for it - it's glued down. The coin, a poetic prank on stingy tippers, is a reflection of the northeastside eatery's lighthearted atmosphere. For more than 30 years, German-born owner Juergen Jungbauer has added to the displays of tchotchekes in his cafe and gift shop, and today's collective mass of wall-hangings puts every chain bar-and-grill to shame. Animal heads, beer steins, cookie molds, coffee grinders, musical instruments, shoes, hats and other gewgaws cover the walls. Clocks mark the time in cities around the world: cutouts of characters in lederhosen hang from the ceiling; and shelves are lined with German candy, cheeses, books and videos (a Teutonic Bugs Bunny, anyone?). To Jungbauer, the cluttered ambience is incomplete without a soundtrack of German folk songs. His employees hate the music: Eyes roll, heads shake, desperate threats are made. While we agree that hours of oompah would be rather maddening, in small doses it perfectly accompanies the cafe's German comfort food. If you can't pronounce the fleischkaese and mettwurstbrote menu items, just order by the numbers, as the regulars do. We love No. 7, the kassler rippchen. The thick, smoky-flavored pork chop comes with a mound of vinegary German potato salad, served hot. The restaurant may be most famous for its baked goods. We like the Black Forest and German chocolate cakes, but the best sweet treat is the cheesecake: moist white cake with center layers of cheesecake and fruit (often cherry, apple or peach). Like the other cakes, it's coated in a rich whipped-cream frosting. We head to the cafe when we're in the mood for inexpensive, hearty food and a challenging game of "I Spy." We also enjoy seeing young former servicemen walk in the place for the first time and smile over sights and smells that remind them of their days stationed in Germany. We especially get a kick out of watching then reach for that nickel.
Heidelberg Haus, Location 7625 Pendleton Pike
Phone: 547-1230
Hours: Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Menu: German classics. Sandwiches and entrees $1.95 to $6.95, pastries and cake slices $1.20 to $2.35
Recommended: The kassler rippchen (pork chop); the potato salad; and the delicious, rich cake.
2 Pictures (Welcomed Excess: Heidelberg Haus adheres to a philosophy of no scrimping, either in the jam-packed decor or the rich goodies such as the whipped-cream-frosted cheesecake.

RBA The Retailer's Baker Association
Indianapolis Convention Center

Fantasyland of gifts provides a profitable setting for bakery foods
March 24-26, 2001
On Tuesday, March 27 will be a bakery tour for the out-of-town bakers to visit a few local specialty bakeries, including the Heidelberg Bakery and Gift Shop.

The Heidelberg Bakery Cafe and Gift Shop literally has something for everyone. First-time customers who stop in at the Heidelberg Bakery Cafe and Gift Shop in Indianapolis may think they're only stopping in for a Danish or a quick coffee and slice of cake. But, hours later, when they finally exit the store, they've not only had a fabulous bakery treat, they've also been treated to a fascinating collection of imported foods and gift items that can to be found anywhere else in the city.
That strategy - irresistible bakery products made from scratch surrounded by unique gifts and hard-to-find food items - has been a winning one for more than 32 years, say owners Juergen and Gabi Jungbauer. From the beginning, when J.J. (as Juergen likes to be called) opened the bakery, he decided to concentrate only on German-style bakery foods and products. "We have never made any donuts or pies," he says. "If customers ask for them, I'd rather send them to a specialty shop."
Instead, J.J. puts his skills as a German-trained pastry chef to work in building a bakery that draws customers from all over the city, as well as from other parts of the state, for products that aren't easy to find elsewhere. Some products are classics. For example, his collection of tortes includes the classic Black Forest cake, but one that's made with a Heidelberg twist: a ring of chocolate butter cream encloses the cherry filling, which goes atop a kirschwasser-sprinkled chocolate layer. Baker Debbie Larson speeds up the cake makeup by putting the ring of butter cream atop chocolate layers, then freezes the layers. The following day, she can deposit the cherry filling into the frozen butter cream ring, and can level the filling without smearing the butter cream. The rest of the cake is put together with fresh whipped cream. Other products are unique to Heidelberg, including hazelnut "fudge" cakes. The fudge layer is actually similar to a rum ball mixture, and is made from cake trimmings that have been extended with chocolate, butter cream, hazelnuts and rum flavor. Debbie forms the mixture into a layer on an 8-inch circle, then deposits it on a prepared cake layer before assembling the rest of the cake using a hazelnut-flavored butter cream between and on top of the cake. "It's a good way to use the extra cake," Debbie says, "and still have something unique for our customers."
Cafe seating helps to sell bakery foods
Customers can buy whole tortes, but Debbie scores the cake tops so the slices can be portion-controlled. Because cafe tables are scattered throughout the bakery, lots of customers order slices of torte to go with coffee or tea. They also can choose from a selection of different German-style foods. They're listed on a menu that's mounted on a spaetzle board, a small wooden board that resembles a breadboard. "We prefer to stick to items that are hard to find somewhere else, " J.J. says. "As a result, we get a lot of lunchtime traffic from business people who want something different. Their menu has specialties like bratwurst, mettwurst, kielbasa and kassler rippchen, which we import to keep them authentic." (Mettwurst is a soft, spreadable sausage, and kassler rippchen are smoked pork chops.) Besides enjoying these products at the bakery, customers also can buy them to take home from the bakery's small refrigerated display case, where items like the kassler rippchen are sold vacuum-packaged.
The cooks must envy the room the bakers have, however, since the fairly extensive menu is prepared in a kitchen space that's quite compact. However, the bakers do help out by preparing the hot German potato salad, made by boiling red potatoes, "grating' roughly on a wire rack and dressing them with a vinegar-and-bacon based mixture. The bakers, who normally are done baking by 10 a.m., provide a variety of breads and rolls that enhance the flavor of the imported sausages. Of course, the bakery carries the selection of products customers expect to see, including Danish, cookies, and decorated cakes, as well as breads and rolls. However, J.J. has certain breads delivered from Chicago bakeries to meet demand for products that would be unprofitable to make in small batches. "Some of our customers want dark rye or pumpernickel breads," he says, "so we can give them what they want without affecting our own labor costs and production schedule by buying from other bakers who do a lot of these breads. "These breads also are used in preparing a variety of sandwiches carried on the cafe menu. That way, customers have an opportunity to sample the various breads. "you might think it's expensive to keep such a large inventory of products," says J.J. "But I look at it as money in the bank. If you keep your money in a savings account, you only earn 2% to 3% interest. But if you buy an item that you can mark up 100%, you've made more money that you could have in that bank account. So, over the years, the gifts have made good business sense for me."

Antique bakery provides a glimpse into the past
J.J. hasn't forgotten his bakery roots. The store's eclectic display includes an "antique" bakery, which also is the focal point of many a school tour. To equip the antique bakery, J.J. bought items at bakery auctions, including an old coal oven, early editions of mixers and a variety of hand tools that preceded modern versions of these labor-saving devices.
But even here, J.J. maintains a German flavor. His antique bakery exhibit also includes an extensive collection of hand-carved wooden springerle forms. He still uses a variety of the forms to make springerle at Christmas. The springerle dough is pressed into the forms, where the design is embossed onto the dough surface. After unmolding, the dough is allowed to dry overnight before baking. As a result of this process, the springerle designs stay sharp and clear, and the cookies themselves are light and crisp.
Photos really can't do justice to the unique nature of the Heidelberg Bakery cafe and Gift Shop, which is full of nooks an crannies and delights at every turn. That's what keeps bringing customers back - not only the delicious treats, but also the opportunity to find that special "got to have it" gift.
Picture 3

The Indianapolis Star
Dining Out - Heidelberg brings Germany to Indiana
Rating: 3.5 out of 4
Friday, February 23, 2001
By Susan Guyett, Staff Writer

Most customers at the Heidelberg Cafe and Bakery fall into two categories. There are the regulars who show up like clockwork to meet friends, have coffee, read the newspaper and enjoy a snack. Other regulars stop in periodically when the yen for hot German potato salad, bratwurst and a hunk of real rye bread overpowers them.
Then there's that other group of patrons. Look over the store's guest book and you'll notice the names of vacationers who plan pit stops around the exit off I-465 on the Northeastside. They drop by the Heidelberg to grab lunch and stock up on provisions that will travel in the car with them to the shores of Florida or Michigan.
No matter who you are or how often you show your face, the welcome mat is out at this unlikely bit of Bavaria at 7625 Pendleton Pike. As the menu says, "Guten Tag, y'all."
Heidelberg Haus , which opened in 1968, is a rambling storefront business that is a bakery, cafe, grocery store, souvenir shop and museum that also rents German videos, Juergen Jungbauer cringes is you call it a restaurant. He likes being diversified.
Cozy seating - Walk in the front door and, if you can take your eyes off the butter-cream frosted cakes, the tortes, tarts, trays of cookies and freshly baked rolls, you'll notice a tiny coffeeshop-like counter where people gather daily to discuss the weighty subjects of the world over a cup of coffee. Prefer more room? There are a few tables scattered about the place, but the Heidelberg seats no more than 30 at one time. The staff encourages customers to adopt the European cafe custom of table-sharing when things get busy.
Jungbauer has been in the baking business since he was 13, and it shows. The baked goods, pastries, hard rolls and cookies are mainstays. Heidelberg also makes wedding cakes frosted with butter cream icing. Try a slice of the fruit tart ($2.95) that consists of a delicate cake juxtaposed with plenty of cream and assorted fruits. Most of the breads are made elsewhere, but the hard rolls made in-house sport a variety of toppings and cost 37 cents each. Germans eat these rolls for breakfast with butter and jelly. Hoosiers can put them to good use by making a so-so sandwich sensational.
Order by number - The menu consists of 15 items, and it's OK to order by number if the German names stump you.
The most popular dish is the No. 1, a bratwurst served with hot potato salad, pickle, plus bread and sweet butter. At $5.45, you can't ask for a tastier dish. The brats, like many of the other meats on the menu, are made by another Indianapolis institution - Klemm's German Sausage and Meat Market at 315 E. South Street.
The other menu items range in price from $2.95 for an open face liver sausage sandwich with potato chips, to $6.95 for the large bratwurst platter. Smoked frankfurters ($5.25) or a smoked pork chop (served warm or cold to your liking) menu - the German-style Fleischkaese at $4.85 - is described as meatloaf but looks like ham and tastes like bologna. Spring for the extra 70 cents it costs to have it fried; it tastes better that way. Hefty bottles of strong mustard are at every table so you can kick up the flavor.
Although there's plenty of beer steins for sale in the back rooms, the only beer of the menu is an imported German non-alcoholic number costing $1.99. Coffee, iced tea and soft drinks cost 99 cents.
As for keeping a number of plates in the air at the same time, Jungbauer likes having a lot of irons in the fire. Besides the cafe and bakery, the Heidelberg is a gift shop that sells souvenirs and tschotskies in every price range.
Looking for a birthday card in German, handmade Christmas ornaments, candles, CDs, lederhosen, T-shirts, coasters (10 for a buck), hats or corny bumper stickers? Look no further.
Other sections of the cafe house offer canned food, cake mixes, vegetables, spices and sauces from Germany that you can use to whip up a special recipe at home. The video collection boasts more than 2,000 titles of German videos. Log on to www.germanvideo.com for more information.
With so much to see, you may fall into Jungbauer's marketing trap. If things work out the way he hopes, you'll stop by to pick up a Linzer Torte and walk out with a couple of flags, a lawn gnome and a magnet for the fridge.

Fantasyland of gifts provides a profitable setting for bakery foods
2/12/2001
The Heidelberg Bakery Cafe and Gift Shop literally has something for everyone.

By Carol Meres Kroskey, baker-editor

Contents :

First-time customers who stop in at the Heidelberg Bakery Cafe and Gift Shop in Indianapolis may think they're only stopping in for a Danish or a quick coffee and slice of cake. But, hours later, when they finally exit the store, they've not only had a fabulous bakery treat, they've also been treated to a fascinating collection of imported foods and gift items that can't be found anywhere else in the city.

store pix

That strategy--irresistible bakery products made from scratch surrounded by unique gifts and hard-to-find food items--has been a winning one for more than 32 years, say owners Juergen and Gabi Jungbauer. From the beginning, when J.J. (as Juergen likes to be called) opened the bakery, he decided to concentrate only on German-style bakery foods and products. "We have never made any donuts or pies," he says. "If customers ask for them, I'd rather send them to a specialty shop."

Instead, J.J. put his skills as a German-trained pastry chef to work in building a bakery that draws customers from all over the city, as well as from other parts of the state, for products that aren't easy to find elsewhere. Some products are classics. For example, his collection of tortes includes the classic Black Forest cake, but one that's made with a Heidelberg twist: a ring of chocolate buttercream encloses the cherry filling, which goes atop a kirschwasser-sprinkled chocolate layer. Baker Debbie Larson speeds up the cake makeup by putting the ring of buttercream atop chocolate layers, then freezes the layers. The following day, she can deposit the cherry filling into the frozen buttercream ring, and can level the filling without smearing the buttercream. The rest of the cake is put together with fresh whipped cream.

store pix

Other products are unique to Heidelberg, including hazelnut "fudge" cakes. The fudge layer is actually similar to a rum ball mixture, and is made from cake trimmings that have been extended with chocolate, buttercream, hazelnuts and rum flavor. Debbie forms the mixture into a layer on an 8-in. circle, then deposits it on a prepared cake layer before assembling the rest of the cake using a hazelnut-flavored buttercream between and on top of the cake. "It's a good way to use the extra cake," Debbie says, "and still have something unique for our customers."

store pix

Cafe seating helps to sell bakery foods
Customers can buy whole tortes, but Debbie scores the cake tops so the slices can be portion-controlled. Because cafe tables are scattered throughout the bakery, lots of customers order slices of torte to go with coffee or tea. They also can choose from a selection of different German-style foods. They're listed on a menu that's mounted on a spaetzle board, a small wooden board that resembles a breadboard. "We prefer to stick to items that are hard to find somewhere else," J.J. says. "As a result, we get a lot of lunchtime traffic from business people who want something different. The menu has specialties like bratwurst, mettwurst, kielbasa and kassler rippchen, which we import to keep them authentic." (Mettwurst is a soft, spreadable sausage, and kassler rippchen are smoked pork chops.) Besides enjoying these products at the bakery, customers also can buy them to take home from the bakery's small refrigerated display per rippchen are sold vacuum-packaged.

store pix

The cooks must envy the room the bakers have, however, since the fairly extensive menu is prepared in a kitchen space that's quite compact. However, the bakers do help out by preparing the hot German potato salad, made by boiling red potatoes, "grating" them roughly on a wire rack and dressing them with a vinegar-and-bacon based mixture.

store pix

The bakers, who normally are done baking by 10 a.m., provide a variety of breads and rolls that enhance the flavor of the imported sausages. Of course, the bakery carries the selection of products customers expect to see, including Danish, cookies and decorated cakes, as well as breads and rolls. However, J.J. has certain breads delivered from Chicago bakeries to meet demand for products that would be unprofitable to make in small batches. "Some of our customers want dark rye or pumpernickel breads," he says, "so we can give them what they want without affecting our own labor costs and production schedule by buying from other bakers who do a lot of these breads." These breads also are used in preparing a variety of sandwiches carried on the cafe menu. That way, customers have an opportunity to sample the various breads and rolls the bakery offers, whether made from scratch or purchased from other bakeries. "Everything works together here," J.J. says. "The bakery products bring customers into the store, the cafe gives them another reason to come more often, and the gifts make it fun to visit anytime."

 

Gifts galore make bakery visits fun
J.J. expanded the bakery three times over the years to accommodate his growing business, which from the beginning included counter and table service, as well as imported chocolates and candies. His waitresses used to wear dirndl uniforms to add to the atmosphere of German authenticity. And German music wafted in the background to complete the experience.

store pix

Early on, J.J. began to include gifts. "I got the idea from drug stores," he says. "The small corner drug stores didn't only sell drugs. They also sold the type of products you used to be able to find in a general store. And, when you went into a drug store, you had to go way in the back for them, and you passed all these other things you could buy on the way. So, I decided to do something similar. We always had put the Danish way in the back, so customers had to pass all the candies, cakes and cookies every day. But then we started adding candles, figurines and T-shirts. We started visiting the gift shows, as well as the fancy food shows and concentrated on buying things that only smaller stores carry. For example, we used to buy Toblerone chocolates before the supermarkets started carrying them. But now that every store has it, we prefer to find products that customers can't buy in a supermarket or department store."

To enhance the ambiance, J.J. also created a unique decor for the bakery, inside and out. "I wanted to make it entertaining for customers to visit the bakery, and I also wanted them to learn when they came in," he says. "So, I hired an artist to do murals on the walls that were typical scenes from a bakery or from areas in Germany." Now, there are few square inches in the store that aren't either painted with an amusing scene or stocked with an assortment of foods or gift products. And, because the cafe tables are scattered throughout the store, customers can literally enjoy a different view each time they come in.

store pix

"You might think it's expensive to keep such a large inventory of products," says J.J. "But I look at it as money in the bank. If you keep your money in a savings account, you only earn 2% to 3% interest. But if you buy at item that you can mark up 100%, you've made more money that you could have in that bank account. So, over the years, the gifts have made good business sense for me."

 

Antique bakery provides a glimpse into the past
J.J. hasn't forgotten his bakery roots. The store's eclectic display includes an "antique" bakery, which also is the focal point of many a school tour. To equip the antique bakery, J.J. bought items at bakery auctions, including an old coal oven, early editions of mixers and a variety of hand tools that preceded modern versions of these labor-saving devices.

store pix

But even here, J.J. maintains a German flavor. His antique bakery exhibit also includes an extensive collection of hand-carved wooden springerle forms. He still uses a variety of the forms to make springerle at Christmas. The springerle dough is pressed into the forms, where the design is embossed onto the dough surface. After unmolding, the dough is allowed to dry overnight before baking. As a result of this process, the springerle designs stay sharp and clear, and the cookies themselves are light and crisp.

Photos really can't do justice to the unique nature of the Heidelberg Bakery Cafe and Gift Shop, which is full of nooks and crannies and delights at every turn. That's what keeps bringing customers back--not only the delicious treats, but also the opportunity to find that special "got to have it" gift.

store pix

 

For more information on RBA Marketplace 2001...
Click here for an overview article on of Marketplace 2001.


Carol Meres Kroskey , baker-editor at Bakery Online, is the award-winning, former senior baker editor of Bakery Production and Marketing magazine. Her baking experience includes stints at various retail, hotel and supermarket bakeries as baker and pastry cook. She also spent several years as an experimental baking technician for the American Institute of Baking and as a test baker at The Long Co., a co-op for independent wholesale bakers. Carol can be reached at carol.kroskey@prodigy.net

 

Learning Languages
The Journal of the National Network for Early Language Learning
Winter 2000

Grimm's Fairy Tales and Other German Videos for Children. Indianapolis, IN: German Language Video Center.
Available from The German Language Video Center, 7625 Pendleton Pike, Indianapolis, IN 46226-5298; 800-252-1957; Fax: 317-547-1263; Web site: www.germanvideo.com. Cost for videos varies from &19.95 to $24.95.
Everybody likes videos - so this review is about German videos - lots of them! The German Language Video Center has the most comprehensive selection of German videos in the United States. All have been digitally transferred to the US-NTSC television standard and can be played on U.S. videocassette players.
The videos most useful for elementary school German classes are the ones of the Brothers Grimm fairy tales. Some, such as Hansel and Gretel and Snow White, are presented by a German storyteller and performed by child actors. Others, such as Cinderella and Little Red Riding Hood, are animated. All videos are in color and each is 30-40 minutes long.
These videos can be used to develop varied, related lessons. For example, you could begin by reading Hansel and Gretel, then decorate a gingerbread house, show the videotape, retell the story, write and illustrate the story as a group, act out the story, or even invite students to write their own fairy tales in German.
Many of the animated videotapes about the Brothers Grimm fairy tales have four different stories per tape. The videos are easily understood and give students an insight into German culture. All videos in the catalogue are also for rent by mail for 30-60 days. You can find detailed descriptions about these and many other German videos on the company's Website.

Greater Indianapolis
Dine

Winter 2000
By chef Juergen Jungbauer

Kaiserschmarrn "Emperor's Delight" from Heidelberg Cafe & Bakery
This Austrian dish was dedicated in the 1860s to Empress Elisabeth. Emperor Franz Joseph liked it even more than his weight-conscience wife, so the Empress' Delight became Emperor's Delight.

 

5 eggs
1 pinch salt
1 1/2 cups flour
101//2 cups milk
3 tablespoons butter
4 tablespoons sugar
Few drops vanilla extract for flavor
Sprinkle of powdered sugar

With a whisk, lightly mix eggs, salt, flour and milk. Let batter sit for three to four minutes. Heat butter in a large frying pan. Pour batter in the pan and cook like an omelet. Turn batter when bottom is done. As the Kaiserschmarrn turns golden brown, tear into small pieces with two forks or a spatula. Add sugar and cook for a few minutes. Arrange on four plates and sprinkle with powdered sugar. Serve hot with apple sauce, strawberry or raspberry jam, ice cream or liqueur. Serves four.
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The Indianapolis Star
Flavors of the World
June 22, 2000
By Patti Denton, Food Editor

Condensed story
Ethnic markets and restaurants stock ingredients for meals of many nations
A few of Indianapolis' less common ethnic markets have been whetting customers' appetites for years from within local restaurants known for their traditional fare. Sprats, or silvery herring in oil is a best seller at Babushka;s Deli, rolled herring (also called Rollmops) is a favorite at Heidelberg Haus.
Diners at Heidelberg Haus on the city's Northeastside have savored the German food on the menu and then taken home a package of spaetzle, or noodles, bakery goods and a jar of rolled herring for 32 years.
The Heidelberg Haus is open seven days a week. Owned by Juergen Jungbauer the business is a little general store, with a deli and bakery, market and gift shop, specializing in German items. Bakery- fresh pastries, elaborate cakes and deserts, cookies and breads; store - canned and packaged items, including spaetzle, or noodles, mustards,pickled herring rolls or rollmops, liver dumplings, chanterelle mushrooms, candies and chocolate. Plus hundreds of other imported groceries. *

Neue Presse (LA-California)
"JJ - the Happy Baker" verzaubert mit seiner Kunst Kinder und Erwachsene
Sonderausgabe Oktoberfest 1999

Suchen Sie nach einem kleinen Stueck Deutschand? Nach einem europaeischen Cafe, wo Sie sich bei einer Tasse Kaffee entspannen koennen? Nach einer deutschen Baeckerei? Oder einem Platz, wo Sie neue Freunde finden? Wenn ja, dann wird das "Heidelberg Haus" in Indianapolis Ihrer Suche ein Ende setzen, da es all das in sich vereinigt.
Juergen Jungbauer oder "JJ", wie ihn seine Freunde und Stammgaeste nennen, eroeffnete das Haus vor ueber 30 Jahren. Damals war es nur eine kleine Baeckerei und JJ stand 7 Tage in der Woche vom fruehen Morgen an in der Backstube. Heute besteht das "Heidelberg Haus" aus der Baeckerei, einem europaeischen Cafe, einem Lebensmittelladen, einem Baeckerei-Museum und dem "German Language Video Center". Ein grosses Angebot - doch das ist es nicht, was das "Heidelberg Haus" mit Leben erfuellt. Es ist die besondere Atmosphaere, die gemuetliche Stimmung, die Juergen Jungbauer seinen Stammgaesten und Gelegenheitsbesuchern bietet. Hier ist einfach alles stimmig: das Essen ist ausgezeichnet, der Service zuvorkommend und die Einrichtung wirkt einladend.
JJ mag den altmodischen Stil und die Tradition, die den Besuchern das Gefuehl von Heimat vermittelt und auch ihm ein Zuhause, fern seiner Heimat Karlsruhe gibt. Im Schwarzwald wurde er als Sohn eines Metzgers geboren. Da seine beiden Brueder das vaeterliche Handwerk erlernten, entschloss er sich mit 13 Jahren Konditor zu werden. Von der Backstube ging es aufs Schiff. Mit der "SS Hanseatic" reister er umher und arbeitete als Konditormeister. Dort traf er auf Karl Hopple, der ihn - begeistert fuer seinen Nachtklub in Long Island engagierte. Mit 30 Dollar in der Tasche kam der damals 19-Jaehrige in New York an. Nach eineinhalb Jahren packte ihn erneut die Wanderlust: ueber Bosten, Vermont und Kalifornien erreichte er Tucson, Arizona, wo er vom Militaer eingezogen wurde. Da er nur wenig Englisch sprach, dauerte es etliche Wochen bis er seine Vorgesetzten davon ueberzuegen konnte, dass er in der Backstube bessere Dienste leisten konnte als in einem Buero. Letztendlich bekam er seine Chance und dufte zeigen, welches wahre Koennen er besass.
Von da an bedurfte es keiner Worte mehr. Sofort wurde er in den Offiziersklub nach Fort Harrison, Indiana, abgeordert und er musste sich keine Sorgen mehr machen. Bei zahlreichen Wettbewerben repraesentierte Juergen Jungbauer die Armee. So flog er beispielsweise als Aushaengeschild fuer die gute militaerische Verpflegung Mitte der 60er Jahre sogar nach Washington, um dort einen Kuchen fuer 700 Personen zu praesentieren. Eines seiner meist bewundertsten Meisterstuecke war ein zweieinhalb Meter hoher Eifelturm aus Zucker, fuer dessen Herstellung er 3 Monate brauchte. Als er Ft. Harrison 1968 verliess, kamen 300 bis 400 Personen jeden Sonntag zu dem von ihm ausgerichteten Brunch. JJ war eine lokale Institution geworden und beschloss daher sich nach Ablauf seiner Dienstzeit in der Gegend niederzulassen und so seinen Bekanntheitsgrad zu nutzen. Durch Zufall fand er eine leerstehende Baeckerei mit angrenzender Metzgerei, die genuegend Platz fuer seine vielfaeltigen Ideen bot. Ueber die Jahre hinweg expandierte die Baeckerei und wurde zum "Heidelberg Haus". Obwohl dort auch eine beachtliche Anzahl herzhafter Gerichte angeboten wird, wehrt sich Juergen Jungbauer gegen die Bezeichnung "Restaurant". Er charakterisiert das "Heidelberg Haus" als Cafe. Mit diesem Begriff verbindet er, einen Ort der Gelassenheit, an dem Gedanken ausgetauscht werden und sich Freunde treffen. Diesen Geist, des traditionellen europaeischen Cafe-Hauses, moechte er bewahren.
Mit seinen Meisterwerken machte Juergen Jungbauer nicht nur Erwachsene gluecklich, auch fuer Kinder steht seine Tuer immer offen. Regelmaessig besuchen Kindergartengruppen und Schulklassen sein Cafe. Dort bringt "JJ, the Happy Baker", wie er sich gerne nennt ihnen seine Handwerkskunst naeher. Durch seine vergnuegte und herzliche Art mitgerissen, bewegen sich die Kinder unbefangen in der Backstube. Gebannt lauschen sie den Erklaerungen des Konditors und bewuendern die alten Backinstrumente im hauseigenen Museum. Aber mitmachen ist immer das Schoenste. Mit einer Kochmuetze ausgeruestet geht es ans Plaetzchen ausstechen und dekorieren - und natuerlich auch ein wenig naschen. Der Teig wandert, nachdem er durch Kinderhand vollendet wurde, in den Ofen. Natuerlich darf jedes Kind anschliessend seine selbstgemachten Plaetzchen mit nach Hause nehmen. Um die Wartezeit auf die Plaetzchen zu verkuerzen, uebt der glueckliche Baecker mit den Kindern den Ententanz ein. Begeistert wird gequakt und die kleinen Aermchen geschwungen. Ueber 10.000 Kinder haben im Laufe der Jahre den deutschen Tanz in JJ's Backstube erlernt.
Mit dem gleichen Enthusiasmus steht Juergen Jungbauer auch fuer seine erwachsenen Gaeste zur Verfuegung. Er ist immer gerne bereit Sonderwuensche zu erfuellen und mit ausgefallenen Kreationen zu ueberraschen. Besonders bewundert werden seine ausgefallenen Hochzeitstorten. Kein Wunder, dass schon so mancher Bund fuers Leben im "Heidelberg Haus" geschlossen wurde. Waehrend Juergen Jungbauer unangefochten ueber die Backstube herrscht, fuehrt seine Ehefrau Gabi das angegliederte "German Language Video Center". Ueber 2500 Videos koennen hier gekauft, aber auch ausgeliehen werden. Darunter sind neben zahlreichen Spielfilmen, Jodel- und Tanzveranstaltugen, Dokumentarfilmen, Opernaufnahmen, Kindergeschichten und Komoedien zu finden.
Backstube, Cafe, Videoverleih und deutscher Einkaufsmarkt - dies ist eine unvergleichliche Kombination, die das "Heidelberg Haus" zu einer Besonderheit in Indianapolis machen, die nicht nur deutsche Besucher zu schaetzen wissen.
Picture

CUB Reporter
Diving into delicious Deutsch dining
Jen: 4 out of 5 stars
Chin-Chin: 4.5 out of 5 stars
February 12, 1999
By Jen Stock and Chin-Chin Ting, Staff writers

Bratwurst. Liverwurst. Snotwurst. That's what might come to mind when trying to envision German cuisine. Or maybe it's sauerkraut. At any rate, Germans are definitely a "meat and potatoes" type of people, and their fare reflects it.
The Heidelberg Cafe Bakery and Gift Shop is no exception. It carries a small menu chick-full of tasty sausage.
The first dish we tried was considered by the manager to be the most popular one: the bratwurst. This entree consisted of two large sausage links and sides of a warm potato salad and rye bread. The sausages were peppery and flavorful, but perhaps the best part was the potato salad. It was definitely not of your common picnic variety, as it was creamy and spicy.
We also had a serving of the pork chops, which came with potato salad. What shocked us the most about these chops was their softness - very unlike the chew-until-Judgement-Day variety available at most restaurants.
Then came the moment we wee waiting for: dessert, in which the Heidelberg specializes. The Cafe contains a pastry counter filled with Willy Wonkian array of cakes, cookies, cakes, pastries and cakes. We went ahead and tried tow different kinds: the apple cheesecake and the chocolate rum cake.
The apple cheesecake was delicious, consisting of three tiers: a typical layer of cheesecake, another of apple pie filling and one of yellow cake. The combination was interesting, and although it wasn't particularly exotic, it was a nice counterbalance to the meat and potatoes.
The chocolate cake was about as good as it gets as far as legal substances go. There were around eight tiers, alternating chocolate cake, rum buttercream, chocolate buttercream, whipped cream and yellow cake.
Extraordinarily rich, this is a dessert that is best not shared, as fighting or arguing over it can provoke unruly disturbances resulting in frowns, stares and eventual excommunication by the rest of the restaurant patrons. What was also unique about the cake was that although it was very rich, it wasn't sugary. Overall, the cakes were excellent and one of the highlights of the cafe.
Another interesting feature of our dining experience was our surroundings. Tables at the cafe are interspersed with the abundant merchandise sold at the shop. The amount of German paraphernalia in this store is truly amazing; it confronts the eye from every imaginable corner and angle, making it a bad situation for compulsive buyers.
The Heidelberg Cafe is a lovely place to visit, whether you want to work off that weight loss which has undoubtedly occurred since New Year, brush up on you German or just enjoy the friendly cafe atmosphere.
Pictures

Washington Journal DC
Ein bisschen Heimat in Indianapolis
Freitag, 30. Oktober 1998
Von Ortun A. Wenzel-Gates

Vor 30 Jahren diente Juergen Jungbauer aus dem Schwarzwald bei der US-Army in Indiana und beschloss: "Hier bleibe ich und mache einen Laden auf..." - Sein kontinentweites German Language Video Center verkauft und verleiht deutsche Video-Filme.
Als meine Freundin Kathi und ich vor kurzem zu einem Treffen nach Indianapolis reisten, planten wir, ein oder zwei Tage laenger zu bleiben, um die Stadt und Umgebung etwas zu erkunden. Sie versprach, dass sie fuer mich einen besonderen Genuss auf Vorrat haette. Das hoerte sich gut an - nichts wie los!
Nachdem wir uns ungefaehr eine halbe Stunde lang um und durch Indianapolis hindurchgeschlaengelt hatten, erreichten wir endlich unser Ziel: eine Landstrasse irgendwo im Nichts mit einigen aneinandergereihten Laeden. Na, Sie wissen schon was ich meine. So, wo ist nun meine Ueberraschung? dachte ich, behielt meine Meinung aber fuer mich. Als wir endlich an einem der Laeden anhielten, war ich sehr verbluefft, den Namen "Heidelberg Haus" auf dem Schild zu lesen. Das war aber noch nicht alles. Gemalt auf dem Schaufenster war das Bild meiner Heimatstadt Heidelberg zu sehen: Schloss und Alte Bruecke! Hmm, das kann ja toll werden. Ich konnte es kaum erwarten hineinzugehen.
Das Geschaeft ist ziemlich gross (ich glaube, frueher waren's einmal drei Betriebe), aber die Raeumlichkeiten sind so proppevoll mit Waren, dass es schwer ist sich durchzuwuehlen. So richtig nach meinem Geschmack! Von deutschen Lebensmitteln zu (etwas) anzueglichen Postkarten, deutschen Liedern auf Kassetten und CD's zu Messern, Hueten und Videos. Alles schien hier vorhanden zu sein. Wir arbeiteten uns durch das verwirrende Gemenge und erreichten endlich die Mitte des Ladens und somit den wichtigsten Teil fuer uns. Wenigstens fuer den Moment. In der Mitte ist naemlich das Cafe und die Baeckerei.
Da es schon beinahe Mittag war, entschlossen wir uns die Waren einmal auszuprobieren. Mal sehen, ob alles so gut schmeckte, wie es aussah! Da die wenigen Tische schon besetzt waren, angelten wir uns die zwei letzten Hocker am Tresen und wurden auch sofort auf deutsch von Hildi Royal begruesst. Sie stammt aus Mainz und arbeitet schon seit sechsundzwanzig Jahren im Heidelberg Haus! Ihre beiden Mitarbeiter sid dagegen noch regelrechte Novizen. Heidi Wills von Nuernberg ist erst seit dreizehn Jahren dabei und Daniela Stokes nur seit "ein paar Jahren".
Ich bestellte ein Leberwurstbroetchen mit Kartoffelsalat und waehrend Hildi mit dem Herrichten beschaeftigt war, unterhielt ich mich ein wenig mit den Stammgaesten am Tresen. Auf meine Frage wie oft sie denn zum Fruehstueck kaemen, meinte einer von ihnen: "Tja, wissen Sie, meine Frau behauptet, dass ich acht Tage in der Woche hierherkomme. Das stimmt aber nicht. Ich komme nur an sieben Tagen!"
Gerade als wir mit unserem Schmaus fertig waren, kam auch schon Inhaber Juergen Jungbauer auf uns zu und stellte sich zu einer Tour zur Verfuegung. Juergen, von seinen Freunden JJ genannt, wurde in Karlsruhe im Schwarzwald als Sohn eines Metzgers geboren. Da seine beiden Brueder auch das vaeterliche Handwerk erlernen wollten, entschloss er sich Konditor zu werden. "Mit neunzehn war ich Konditor auf dem Schiff Die Hanseatic", erklaerte er uns. "Einem der Passagiere schmeckten meine Torten so gut, dass er mich sofort fuer seinen Club in Long Island einstellen wollte. Ich wollte schon immer nach Amerika, um mein Glueck zu versuchen und nahm sein Angebot an," schmunzelte er. Als er in New York landete hatter er dreissig Dollar in der Tasche.
Nach eineinhalb Jahren in Long Island wurde JJ wieder von der Wanderlust gepackt. Ueber Boston, Vermont und Kalifornien erreichte er endlich Tucson, Arizona, wo er vom Militaer eingeholt und eingezogen wurde. Seine Zeit bei der Armee wurde beinahe zur Katastrophe, denn keiner wollte ihm glauben, das er sich viel besser dazu eigne, in der Backstube zu walten, anstatt als Schreiber in einem Buero vor sich hinzuschmachten. Endlich gelang es ihm aber doch, die Obrigkeit von seinem Talent zu ueberzeugen und "von der Zeit an hatte ich keine Sorgen mehr."
Er wurde nach Fort Harrison, Indiana versetzt, wo er den Rest seiner Dienstzeit verbrachte und jeden Sonntag die Gaeste im Offiziersklub mit seinen gebackenen Kreationen betoerte. Als seine Dienstzeit abgelaufen war, beschloss er, sich in der Gegend niederzulassen. "Durch's Militaer hatte ich Unmengen Werbung erhalten und dachte mir, hier kennen mich die Leute schon. Hier bleib' ich und mache einen Laden auf", erklaerte JJ. Durch Zufall fand er eine Baeckerei mit Metzgerei daneben, die beide gerade frei wurden und nutzte die Chance. Das war vor dreissig Jahren. Tja, so fing alles an.
Heute besteht das Heidelberg Haus" aus einer Baeckerei, einem richtigen europaeischen Cafe, einem Lebensmittelladen, einem Baeckerei-Museum und dem German Language Video Center. Vor dreissig Jahren war JJ sieben Tage lang vom fruehen Morgen an in der Backstube. Heute hat er insgesamt dreiundzwanzig Angestellte, die seine Arbeit etwas erleichtern. Seine huebsche Frau Gabi und ihre beiden Assistenten leiten das Video Center.
Also, um mal ganz ehrlich zu sein, nachdem ich das Geschaeft und das Baeckerei-Museum gesehen, und mir ein Stueck wunderbarer Schwarzwaelder Kirschtorte einverleibt hatte, bekam ich richtig Sehnsucht und wuenschte mir, ich wohnte ein bisschen naeher an Indianapolis. Aber leider bin ich in Maryland ansaessig und mein Besuch ging sehr rapide seinem Ende zu. Ich muss gestehen, dass mir bei dem Gedanken, diesen schoenen Platz und die netten Leute verlassen zu muessen, ein bisschen ruehrselig zumute wurde. Dann erwaehnte JJ, er haette noch eine kleine Ueberraschung fuer Kathi und mich. Aber was sollte da jetzt noch kommen!
Nun muss ich Sie aber fragen: Gehen Sie oftmals in einen Video-Laden auf der Suche nach deutschen Filmen ohne sie zu finden? Moechten Sie gerne ab und zu so richtig in der deutschen Sprache versinken? Schauen Sie sich gerne klassische deutsche Filme an? Dann suchen Sie nicht weiter, denn das Lager, in das wir von JJ gefuehrt wurden, erfuellt Ihnen all diese Wuensche und noch mehr! Der Raum ist von oben bis unten (bis auf die Fenster) mit Regalen gefuellt, die beinahe mit Videos ueberquellen. Ich wollte mich aufs erste Regal stuerzen und alle Videos durchschauen. Es kam mir so vor, als waeren wir in Deutschland. Ich war entzueckt! JJ schaute Kathi und mich lachend an. "Der Ausdruck in Euren Gesichtern ist koestlich. Ich bin froh, dass ich Euch so richtig ueberrascht habe!"
Ich muss Ihnen wohl nicht erklaeren, dass unser Abschiednehmen nicht mehr so traurig war. Ich habe den Video Katalog bei mir zu Hause. So oft ich will, kann ich mir nun einen Film bestellen. Alle Videos werden zum Verkauf angeboten, aber (hier kommt's!). Fuer sieben Dollar koennen Sie einen Film einen ganzen Monat lang ausleihen. JJ zahlt sogar das Porto!
Bei Ihrem naechsten Besuch in Indianapolis, schauen Sie doch bei JJ und seinen Mitarbeitern vorbei, um die koestlichen Backwaren zu probieren oder wenn das nicht moeglich ist, fordern Sie JJ's Katalog an und ergoetzen Sie sich an Videos! Sie koennen JJ unter folgender Adresse erreichen: The German Language Video Center / 7625 Pendleton Pike / Indianapolis, IN 46226 / phone: 317-547-1257 / fax: 317-547-1263. Der Katalog kann fuer $2 angefordert werden.
5 Pictures

German-USA Magazine
Notes of an Outlander
October 11, 1998
Von Ortun A. Wenzel-Gates

When Kathi and I met in Indianapolis to attend a meeting, we scheduled an extra couple of days to explore the city and surroundings on our own before heading back to our respective states. She promised to have a special treat in store for me. She arrived in the city a few days before our meeting and was already more familiar with the area. I was game for anything and off we went.
She wove her way through and around Indianapolis for about half an hour and we finally arrived at a shopping strip. You know the kind I mean. A little shopping strip in the middle of nowhere. Alright, where is my treat?, I thought, but did not voice my disappointment. Imagine my surprise when we stopped at a store named Heidelberg Haus. Not only was the shop named after my hometown but the famous scene of Alte Bruecke and Schloss were painted on the window! Hmm, this was going to be great! I could hardly wait to get in there!
The store is rather large (actually, the space used to be occupied by three businesses in the past) but it is so stuffed with merchandise that it's hard to maneuver through the isles. Just the kind of place I love to explore! The eclectic wares range from German food stuffs to naughty postcards, German tapes and CD's to knives, hats, and videos. As we made our way through the bewildering array of goods we finally arrived in the middle portion of the shop. Ahh, the lunch counter, cafe, and bakery.
It was close to noon and we decided to try the fare. I hoped it would taste as good as it looked. Since the few tables were occupied, we snagged the two remaining chairs at the counter where we were greeted in German by Hildi Royal (Mainz) who, it turns out, has been working at the Heidelberg Haus for twenty-six years! Her two co-patriots (Heidi Wills from Nuernberg and Daniela Stokes who hails from Indianapolis) have been employees for a mere thirteen and only a few years respectively.
I chose a Leberwurstbroetchen with Kartoffelsalat and chatted with the regulars at the counter while Hildi was preparing the food. When asked how often they frequent the Heidelberg Cafe, one of the guys said: Well, my wife alleges that I come in here eight days a week. But that's not true. I only come seven days!
As we were finishing our lunch, Juergen Jungbauer, proprietor of the Heidelberg Cafe, arrived and proceeded to give us a personal tour with narration. Juergen, known as "JJ" to friends and customers, was born in Karlsruhe, Germany. His father was a butcher and since his two brothers elected to follow their father's footsteps, JJ decided to embark on a different adventure and learn the confectioner's trade.
"By the time I was nineteen, I was working as the pastry chef on the cruise ship Hanseatic," he explained. "One of the passengers liked my pastries so much that he offered to hire me on the spot to work in his night club on Long Island. I always thought it would be fun to come to America to make my fortune so I took him up on the offer," he grinned. Shortly thereafter JJ landed in New York. He had thirty dollars in his pocket. Eventually, while in Tucson, Arizona, JJ was drafted into the army. His stint almost turned into a disaster because the army wanted to train him as a clerk even though he kept insisting that he was better at baking cakes than typing. He finally managed to convince the powers that be of his talents. "After that, I had it made."
Eventually he was assigned to Fort Harrison, Indiana and delighted the patrons of the officers club with his baked creations. As JJ tells it, "I received so much free advertisement through the army for my works of art, that I figured I might as well stay here and open a shop." As luck would have it a bakery and an adjoining meat market did indeed become available and he grabbed the chance. That was thirty years ago and the rest, as they say, is history.
Today, the Heidelberg Haus consists of the bakery, a real European cafe, a general store, the Bakery Museum, and last but not least, the German Language Video Center. JJ does not do all the baking himself anymore. He employs twenty-three people and is also ably assisted in the Video Center by his lovely wife Gabi and her staff.
I have to be honest with you, after seeing the shop, the bakery museum and tasting an absolutely divine Schwarzwaelder Kirschtorte I was nostalgic and wished (rather in a futile way) that I would live a little closer to Indianapolis. Alas, I live in Maryland and my visit was drawing to a close. I got slightly maudlin at the prospect of leaving this delightful place and its people. Then JJ mentioned that he still had another surprise in store for us. I was a little skeptical. How could he top this wonderful experience we'd been having?
Let me back up a little here and ask you: Have you ever gone to the video store looking for a German movie and have been disappointed? Do you love to positively wallow in German movies from time to time Are you a classic movie buff? Would you rather see some of the recent German movies? Well, look no further! The place JJ led us into almost gave me sensory overload! We walked into a large warehouse/office which is stocked from top to bottom (except the windows) with German videos. I just wanted to dive in and search through all of them. This was almost as good as being in Germany. I was positively overwhelmed! JJ looked at Kathi and me and just burst out laughing. "Your faces are worth a thousand words! I hoped I could really give you a good surprise."
Need I tell you that finding the Video Center made leaving just a little bit easier? Now I can peruse the extensive catalog at home and order videos to my hearts content. All the videos in the catalog are for sale but they can also be rented. A mere seven dollars will generally secure a video for you for a whole month. They even pay for shipping. What a deal!
So, if you are ever in Indianapolis, make a point to stop by the Heidelberg Haus, say hello to JJ and his staff, and sample their wares. Tell them I sent you! If that"s not possible, do the next best thing. Order a video and enjoy!
To get in touch with JJ go to www.germanvideo.com or www.heidelberghaus.com
5 pictures
text
Heidelberg Haus Front Window
Hildi, Daniela, Heidi with some regulars
JJ Demonstrates the Broetchenmaschine
Bakery Museum
Gabi, JJ, Joseph Bernschneider, and Heidi Rose in the Video Center

Nuvo Newsweekly, Indianapolis
Heidelberg Cafe and Bakery
Guten Tag Y'all
October 1-8, 1998
By Susan Guyett

Call the Heidelberg Cafe a restaurant and you'll get an argument form owner Juergen Jungbauer. His rambling storefront at 7625 Pendleton Pike is a cafe, variety store, bakery, museum and classroom depending on your reason for stopping by. You can get food there - it's a regular lunch and snack spot for countless people who can't stay away. But with it s limited menu and limited hours of operation, JJ, as he's known to his customers, hesitates to call it a restaurant.
Regular Heidelberg customers fall into two general categories: those who come in every day - some, like clockwork, arrive at the same time five days a week and have for decades - and other regulars who stop by once or twice a year on their way through Indianapolis for a vacation in Michigan or during the annual drive south to Florida. No matter what category you fall into, the welcome mat is out.
Anyone who laments that Indianapolis has no local, ethnic eateries hasn't visited this City of Lawrence institution. Step through the door and it's like walking into a shop in Bavaria. If you can take your eyes off the buttercream frosted layer cakes, tortes, trays of cookies and freshly baked rolls and pastries, you'll find enough German trinkets and tchotches to rival any hockey souvenir shop. Gravitate to another room and you'll discover canned foods, vegetables and all the spices and sauces you need to whip up a German specialty at home.
The atmosphere is warm but busy. About 10 tables are scattered throughout the cafe and even fewer seats ring the counter the management encourages visitors to embrace another European cafe tradition - sharing your table with folks you don't know. I can tell you this, you haven't lived until you hear "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" sung in German while you hover over a platter of spicy gulay sausage and hot potato salad.
The walls are teeming with merchandise, memorabilia and antiques. If there are a few knickknacks and ancient baking utensils high on a shelf that haven't been dusted in a while or if the Cuckoo clocks don't chirp in unison, so what? This is part of the charm. The Jungbauers pay attention to the important things: cooking authentic quality foods and baked goods, providing customers services that includes attending funerals and weddings when appropriate and allowing folks to sit for hours over a cup of coffee. Ladies arrive to do needlepoint. Men discuss politics. After all, that's what a kaffeeklatsch is.
While hot coffee, baked goods and pastries - all made with the finest ingredients - are the shop's mainstay, the shelves are enticingly crowded with stuffed animals, German language magazines, video tapes, newspapers, crossword puzzle books, shot glasses and wood carvings. It's hard not to start roaming just to see what's around the next bend. Words fail to describe the assortment of statues, beer steins, clocks, hats, lederhosen, lawn gnomes, chocolates, spaetzle, greeting cards, spices and knickknacks that are located throughout the store. J.J. makes no apologies for the confusion. Want orderly shelves and strict inventory control? Go to K-Mart. But there's mechanizing method in this madness. The stocked shelves have an allure that doesn't quit and he figures that folks may just pick up and extra item or two to go with that Linzer Torte .
You can't go wrong ordering any of the homemade baked goods. The cakes are in a class by themselves. The coffee cakes melt in your mouth, the baklava (OK, maybe it's not German but it's delicious) and even the bear claws are great.
Anyone who has spent hours searching for hard rolls in Indiana, look no further. Your search is over. They are at Heidelberg. These babies come in all kinds of shapes and toppings (including one topped with onion) and cost 29 cents each. Most of the authentic German breads, though, are not made in-house.
The most popular dish by far is the No. 1, the German style bratwurst that comes with potato salad, bread and butter and pickle spears. This is not the bratwurst you're used to picking up at the supermarket, it's what you'd find in Germany (or at Klemm's downtown). That, and the smoked pork chop (Kassler Rippchen) are the priciest items on the menu at $5.95. Hefty bottles of strong mustard are on every table to spice things up if you need it. What you'll pay for lunch or a dinner means you'll have money left over for dessert.
Jungbauer, who has been baking since he was 13 years old, has made one concession to his customers. It takes the form of the Poor Baker Sandwich, a sub-like concoction of assorted lunch meats, that comes with cheese and chips. He wanted to take the popular $2.75 sandwich off the menu but customers protested. And so it stays, alongside the Farmer's Brats and the Weisswurst and the boiled white sausages that are a Bavarian specialty.
2 Pictures

Amerika Woche , Chicago IL
Mehr als nur ein Geschaeft
9. Mai 1998

Allein das Stoebern macht im Heidelberg Haus von Juergen Jungbauer riesigen Spass: Ein Konditor mit etlichen Auszeichnungen
Indianapolis - Wer von seinen zwei Dutzend Angestellten und Kunden nur noch mit den Initialen angesprochen wird, der hat sich diese Anrede sicherlich verdient. "JJ hatte 30 Jahre Zeit, sich seine Meriten zu erwerben. Und der Name Juergen Jungbauer, fuer den diese beiden Buchstaben stehen, hat nicht erst seit gestern einen guten Klang.
Der Karlsruher ist nicht nur beliebt, weil er so unwahrscheinlich gutes Gebaeck zaubert und so viele schoene Artikel aus , "good old Germany" in seinem Geschaeft feilbietet. Juergen Jungbauer ist vor allem eine herzensgute Seele. Und das soll schon etwas heissen bei jemandem, der drei Jahrzehnte ein Geschaeft und Cafe am selben Platz betreibt. Aber selbst im 30. Jubilaeumsjahr seines: Heidelberg Haus" im Grossraum von Indianapolis hat der 55jaehrige den Spass an seiner Arbeit noch nicht verloren.
Dabei haette er es wahrlich nicht mehr noetig, tagein tagaus Torten zu kreieren, hinter der Theke zu stehen oder sich um seine 1900 Videotitel zu kuemmern, die von hier ueber die gesamten Vereinigten Staaten verschickt werden.
Bereits mit 13 Jahren erlernte er sein Handwerk in Karlsruhe. Als Konditor auf dem stolzen Schiff "Hanseatic" wurde er von einem Nachtclubbesitzer aus New York entdeckt. Seine Wanderjahre fuehrten den Wuerttemberger nach Vermont, Arizona und San Francisco. Und sogar fuer die weltberuehmte Trapp-Familie durfte er backen.
Erst die amerikanische Armee brachte ihn nach Indianapolis, wo er seinen Wehrdienst mit dem Spritzbeutel verbrachte. "Da hatte ich ein grossartiges Leben", schmunzelt der scheinbar immer froehliche Jungbauer. Sogar ins Weisse Haus haben sie ihn damals geschickt.
Selbst noch nach seinem Ausscheiden bei Onkel Sam war die Armee zunaechst sein bester Kunde. Auftritte im Fernsehen taten ein uebriges, um ihn und sein neu eroeffnetes "Heidelberg Haus" 1968 bekannt zu machen. Und die Hilfsbereitschaft war enorm. Als Jungbauer ein Schild aufhing, dass er in Kuerze ein Geschaeft eroeffnen wuerde, waren im Handumdrehen Deutschamerikanerinnen zur Stelle, die ihm halfen, den Laden zu saeubern und einzurichten.
Damals waren die Deutschen noch im Kaufrausch was Artikel aus der zurueckgelassenen Heimat anging, obwohl selbst heute noch Kunden aus Kentucky und Ohio zu Juergen Jungbauer kommen, um in seinem urgemuetlichen Gemischtwarenladen Grosseinkaeufe zu machen. Dabei macht allein das Stoebern riesigen Spass. Hier stehen Antiquitaeten zwischen Sauerkraut, Zeitungen, Uhu-Klebern und Negerkuessen. Zu Weihnachten duerfen mehrere hundert Kinder Teig ausrollen. Dabei spielt Jungbauer praktisch das ganze Jahr ueber Weihnachtsmann. Er ist dafuer bekannt, dass er seine Broetchen nicht gerade selten sogar verschenkt.
Picture

The Indianapolis News
Looking for Lederhosen
February 27, 1997
By Kyle Niederpruem
Heidelberg is a sweet stop for old and new friends

Grinning plastic lawn gnomes line the front windows of a brightly painted brick building on the city's Far Eastside.
The emissaries of good luck lure customers inside.
But it wasn't luck that brought Juergen Jungbauer success at his Heidelberg Cafe.
He's satisfied the sweet tooth of presidents, constructed sugary stiff replicas of the Eiffel Tower taller than any Hoosier basketball player, won plenty of national culinary awards and even sold Linzer tortes to the Baroness maria Von Trapp after her family settled in Stowe, Vt.
Jungbauer is a content man in his cafe of kitsch. The food is good. The customers are happy.
This is a home away from home for people whose last names are filled with vowels and just as comfortable for those who aren't German.
This is the best place to find chocolate-dipped Florentine cookies, suede lederhosen, a stuffed Wolperdinger (more on this later), musical zithers, a wall clock that shows the exact time in Yokohama, a constant speed transmission from a B-52 bomber, and a wall filled with antique springerle cookie molds.
As for the cookies, it's also one of the few places in town you'll find Hirschhorn Salz, a salt with ammonium-hydrogen carbonate that's a leavening agent necessary to make butterless springerles.
These finds also are key to Jungbauer's success.
"A cafe is a German place to socialize," He explains. "You have a cup of coffee and relax with a light snack. I could buy me perfect shelves. Then it would be like Kmart. I like the old-fashioned hardware store look - confusions."
It's an uncomplicated shop with plenty of clutter and German chatter.
"We're not a fancy place. It's down-to-earth. We're doing just fine. Not that we're floating in money. We pay the rent and the light bill. That's good enough," says the 54-year-old pastry chef, whose friends call him J.J.
It's also a special day at the cafe. Longtime friend and customer Pete Rompilla has just stopped in for coffee and a slice of Black Rest cake.
Jungbauer and his wife, Gabi, haven't seen him in a while at 7625 Pendleton Pike.
Rompilla started coming in 1983 and began leaving behind more than just a tip. He'd doodle on his napkins, leaving cafe scenes and comments from the day's business. Often, his ink lines created a holiday theme.
On this day, Rompilla leaves behind a drawing of a reporter and photographer chasing him.
"Curiosity brought me in here," he says. "I kept going past and wondered what it was like. I like the atmosphere, the people."
Instead of pitching Rompilla's drawings, Jungbauer has tucked them all into a scrapbook. He calls his friend the "napkin artist."
John Dott is another regular. He comes in midmorning, ordering an unusual breakfast of hard boiled eggs, sliced and placed in layers on a roll sprinkled with paprika. A few pickles and potato chips fill in the plate. Dott, who says his breakfast is a personal concoction and not on the menu, comes in about four times a week.
"You feel better, John?" asks Hildi Royal, manager for 25 years. Dott is recovering from a cold. If he wasn't, he'd sing for his breakfast, he assures everyone at the counter - where the walls are lined with just about any item a person could imagine.
Jungbauer says customers eyes "get saturated" as they wander over the dusty bric-a-brac. They sometimes will ask Jungbauer if he'll sell an item or two from his unusual collection. "Once in a while, I break down. But usually I say it was from my mom on my 16th birthday."
Near the food counter on a high shelf is the Wolperdinger, a fabled creature with the body of a rat, the tail of a rabbit, the wings of a bird, and horns sprouting from the top of its head and the sides of its mouth.
It's a creature rumored to live in the mountains - and which also has found a handsome home in the warmth of the Heidelberg Cafe.
Insgesamt 2 Pictures, frontpage included

The Indianapolis Star
A Taste of the Old World
Wednesday, February 26, 1997
By Kyle Niederpruem
Juergen Jungbauer's cafe is a comforting mix of conversation, clutter and culinary delights. "A cafe is a German place to socialize. You have a cup of coffee and relax with a light snack. I could buy me perfect shelves. Then it would be like Kmart. I like the old fashioned hardware store look - confusion." - Juergen Jungbauer.
Picture Front page
Grinning plastic lawn gnomes line the front windows of a brightly painted brick building on the city's Far Eastside.
The emissaries of good luck lure customers inside.
But it wasn't luck that brought Juergen Jungbauer success at his Heidelberg Cafe.
He's satisfied the sweet tooth of presidents, constructed sugary stiff replicas of the Eiffel Tower taller than any Hoosier basketball player, won plenty of national culinary awards and even sold Linzer tortes to the Baroness maria Von Trapp after her family settled in Stowe, Vt.
Jungbauer is a content man in his cafe of kitsch. The food is good. The customers are happy.
This is a home away from home for people whose last names are filled with vowels and just as comfortable for those who aren't German.
This is the best place to find chocolate-dipped Florentine cookies, suede lederhosen, a stuffed Wolperdinger (more on this later), musical zithers, a wall clock that shows the exact time in Yokohama, a constant speed transmission from a B-52 bomber, and a wall filled with antique springerle cookie molds.
As for the cookies, it's also one of the few places in town you'll find Hirschhorn Salz, a salt with ammonium-hydrogen carbonate that's a leavening agent necessary to make butterless springerles.
These finds also are key to Jungbauer's success.
"A cafe is a German place to socialize," He explains. "You have a cup of coffee and relax with a light snack. I could buy me perfect shelves. Then it would be like Kmart. I like the old-fashioned hardware store look - confusions."
It's an uncomplicated shop with plenty of clutter and German chatter.
"We're not a fancy place. It's down-to-earth. We're doing just fine. Not that we're floating in money. We pay the rent and the light bill. That's good enough," says the 54-year-old pastry chef, whose friends call him J.J.
It's also a special day at the cafe. Longtime friend and customer Pete Rompilla has just stopped in for coffee and a slice of Black Rest cake.
Jungbauer and his wife, Gabi, haven't seen him in a while at 7625 Pendleton Pike.
Rompilla started coming in 1983 and began leaving behind more than just a tip. He'd doodle on his napkins, leaving cafe scenes and comments from the day's business. Often, his ink lines created a holiday theme.
On this day, Rompilla leaves behind a drawing of a reporter and photographer chasing him.
"Curiosity brought me in here," he says. "I kept going past and wondered what it was like. I like the atmosphere, the people."
Instead of pitching Rompilla's drawings, Jungbauer has tucked them all into a scrapbook. He calls his friend the "napkin artist."
John Dott is another regular. He comes in midmorning, ordering an unusual breakfast of hard boiled eggs, sliced and placed in layers on a roll sprinkled with paprika. A few pickles and potato chips fill in the plate. Dott, who says his breakfast is a personal concoction and not on the menu, comes in about four times a week.
"You feel better, John?" asks Hildi Royal, manager for 25 years. Dott is recovering from a cold. If he wasn't, he'd sing for his breakfast, he assures everyone at the counter - where the walls are lined with just about any item a person could imagine.
Jungbauer says customers eyes "get saturated" as they wander over the dusty bric-a-brac. They sometimes will ask Jungbauer if he'll sell an item or two from his unusual collection. "Once in a while, I break down. But usually I say it was from my mom on my 16th birthday."
Near the food counter on a high shelf is the Wolperdinger, a fabled creature with the body of a rat, the tail of a rabbit, the wings of a bird, and horns sprouting from the top of its head and the sides of its mouth.
It's a creature rumored to live in the mountains - and which also has found a handsome home in the warmth of the Heidelberg Cafe.
Insgesamt 2 Pictures, frontpage included

Washington Journal DC
Freitag, 6. Dezember 1996
Atlantic City, NJ - Juergen Jungbauer und seine Frau Gaby sind in diesen Herbsttagen viel unterwegs mit der riesigen Auswahl an deutschen und internationalen Video-Kassetten, die das German Language Video Center an der 7625 Pendleton Pike in Indianapolis, IN zum Kauf anbietet. Gaby und Juergen Jungbauer weilten kuerzlich beim zweitaegigen Oktoberfest in Tah Mahal Casino-Resort in Atlantic City und brachten tausende Kassetten zur Auswahl mit, wie das obige Foto zeigt. Fuer Katalog oder Auskuenfte Tel. 317-547-1257 oder Fax 317-547-1263 bzw. beachten Sie den Inseratenteil der Vorwoche.
Picture by Joe Pasternack

CITY OF LAWRENCE
Office of the Mayor
Thomas D/ Schneider
Proclamation

WHEREAS, for twenty-eight years the City of Lawrence and our larger metropolitan community have benefited from the special talent, artistry and ability of Juergen Jungbauer, German pastry chef extraordinaire; and
WHEREAS, our city's distinguished pastry chef and entrepreneur, Juergen Jungbauer, was born on June 30, 1943 in Karlsruhe, Germany, and thus on June 30, 1996 is celebrating his fifty-third birthday; and
WHEREAS, in addition to his proprietorship of the Cafe Heidelberg in our city, Juergen Jungbauer is an active participant in our community, including as a parishioner of St. Lawrence Roman Catholic Church and as a member of the Lawrence Optimist Club; and
WHEREAS, Juergen Jungbauer has served our country as a member of the United States army and was first introduced to our community by being stationed at Fort Benjamin Harrison; and
WHEREAS, Juergen Jungbauer, his wife, Gabi, and his children, Heidi, Corina, Tanya and Angela, have contributed significantly and in a most unique way to the quality of life in our city and to the epicurean delight of our people.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, Thomas D. Schneider, Mayor of the City of Lawrence, Indiana, hereby proclaim Sunday, June 30, 1996, Juergen Jungbauer Day in the City of Lawrence, and I join the family and the many friends of Juergen Jungbauer and the many satisfied customers of the Cafe Heidelberg in wishing Juergen Jungbauer a happy birthday and many happy returns of his day.
Dated this 24th day of June, 1996
at Lawrence, Indiana
Thomas D. Schneider, Mayor

The Lawrence Township Journal
860 kindergartners treated to annual Heidelberg trip
Wednesday, March 6, 1996

Annual "Bake-off" The Heidelberg Bakery, 7625 Pendleton Pike, is one of the best field trips of the year for Centralized Kindergarten of the Metropolitan School District of Lawrence Township.
The annual event begins as children are greeted by bakery owner Mr. Jungbauer (or "JJ"). The children are then given a tour of the antique bakery museum and it is off to bake cookies in the kitchen (picture).
Each child receives his own cookie dough to cut, bake, decorate and to take home the finished product. Mr. Jungbauer donates a great amount of time (as well as ingredients!) to accommodate 860 children and it is always enjoyed immensely by all.

North Star
Ethnic Restaurant Reviews
Heidelberg Cafe
November 17, 1995

The Heidelberg Cafe is a small restaurant which contains all the qualities of authentic German life. The cafe is located on Pendleton Pike next to Burger King.
There are many different types of German style cuisine that may be sampled at a very small cost to the customer.
On our trip to the Heidelberg we ate delicious German style fried bratwurst and boiled knockwurst. The sausages were served with bread and butter and hot potato salad.
The food was wonderful and the portions were very plentiful.
The cafe also offers a German style gift shop. They have items ranging from T-shirts and cards, to cookies and pastries, at a very reasonable price.
To take a step back into the German culture, try this wonderful German cafe.
Pictures

Indianapolis Monthly
Exotic Tastes
May 1995
by Marilyn Peachin

Indiana, the land of beef and potatoes, also offers great goi rolls and a mean pud thai.
A half century ago, Indianapolis restaurant meals usually consisted of either thick slabs of red meat or groaning platters of fried chicken. Since no one used the word "ethnic," anything falling outside the bounds of traditional American fare was simply labeled "foreign food." The tiny cadre of restaurants serving these alien specialties consisted of a few Italian places where pasta was unknown but spaghetti ruled, plus a clutch of "Chinese" establishments offering sparse selections of chow mein.
Not so today. Indy boasts countless ethnic restaurants serving dishes from such far-flung countries as Afghanistan, Thailand, Greece and Russia. And Hoosiers' love of pasta seemingly knows no bounds, as the proliferation of Italian eateries shows. One of the first local ethnic enclaves took root in 1968, after Juergen Jungbauer, a young German-born chef who served with the U.S. Army, was discharged at Fort Benjamin Harrison. He promptly opened his own bakery/coffee shop, the Heidelberg Cafe, on the far Eastside. Jungbauer's rich German pastries and Teutonic specialties such as bratwurst and quickly won a wide following.
1 Picture (The Eastside's Heidelberg Cafe serves up German entrees and rich pastries.

The Final Cut
Military find Heidelberg Haus German Wonderland
By Senior Airman Karen L. Cooper
April 18, 1995

There's no need for a passport to experience a bit of the "old country." All that's essential is the desire to indulge in a potpourri of German goodies. From the post, a 10-minute drive past the doughnut shops, hamburger stops and soft-serve havens is a German wonderland with all the authenticity of a feathered, felt cap bought at the Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany. Black-forest cakes, bratwurst lunches and hand carved souvenirs can all be fund under the roof of the Heidelberg Haus, located at 7625 Pendleton Pike. Founded in 1968 by owner Juergen L. Jungbauer, the Heidelberg Haus is a German bakery, cafe, gift shop and grocery mart. The cafe is frequented by military members previously stationed in Germany and Germans living in the area who are married to military members, said Corina L. Jungbauer, the owner's daughter, as she was tending to the customers. Jungbauer is a native of Germany. He gained American citizenship and served in the Army as a pastry chef for the post officers club from 1966 to 1968, said Corina. "The soldiers are exited we have brotchen (sandwich rolls) and authentic gift items like they had in Germany,: said Corina.
Gudrun Mathews, a post exchange sales associate, married an Army soldier. She has been living in America for 15 years, said Mathews, while keying in prices at the register. "The Heidelberg Haus reminds me of home because of its German cooked meals and tortes," said Mathews. "Also, I go to the Heidelberg on Tuesdays and Thursdays for the fresh rye bread and cooking ingredients." Upon volksmarching (hiking) through the door of the Heidelberg, visitors can hear the Germanic tones flowing from the tongues of two women sitting at the front table eating pastries. "They've been coming here forever it seems, " said Corina. "They stay for a couple of hours every day." Next, visitors are bombarded with the sight of German trinkets for sale. Everything from romance magazines, newspapers, videos, handmade nutcrackers and hand-blown Christmas ornaments are on display throughout several rooms.
The cafe is also decorated with antique farm tools, ceramic milk jugs, stuffed and mounted animals skins and beer steins. However, all the beer sold in the cafe is nonalcoholic and is imported from Germany, said corina. A waitress clothed in a white-lace blouse with a flowered skirt (dirndl), takes the customer's order while smiling and speaking with a German accent. "Knockwurst, which is sausage with rye bread, is a typical German meal and costs $1.95," she says. Customers might also order the Lachsbrot. It is imported smoked salmon and rye bread for $4.50.
Sandwiches are served quickly, anytime, according to the cafe menu. "The longest it takes to get served is ten minutes," said Corina, as the totaled a bill at the antique-styled cash register. The cafe hours during the weekdays are 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. On weekends the hours are Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Being able to choose a piece of cake from a large selection like she does at the bakeries in Germany is what Edith M. Teyes, a post exchange sales associate, likes best about the Heidelberg. Reyes, a native of Kitzingen, Germany, said. " I go to the Heidelberg Haus once a week, and it compares to any coffee house in Germany."
1 Picture

Lawrence Times
Flour children
Week of Wednesday, February 8, 1995

It was cookie time for the students in Lawrence Township Centralized Kindergarten classes this week. The children went in shifts to Heidelberg Haus on Pendleton Pike to learn from Juergen Jungbauer about the art of baking. Jungbauer, who owns the bakery, has been involved with the kindergarten program for several years. He says he is delighted to share his culinary knowledge with the young apprentice chefs. The students cut their cookie patterns out of dough squares and decorated them. They watched in fascination as Jungbauer decorated a cake with roses and petals made of icing. In the past, Jungbauer said kindergartners have usually used around 700 pounds of cookie dough during their baking field trip. In this photo, the students are spreading flour over their work stations prior to cutting the dough into shapes for the cookies. Each student got to take their creations home with them.

Lawrence Township Journal/AD-Courier Publications
Lawrence Centralized Kindergarten makes eighth annual visit to Heidelberg
March 1-2, 1994
By Kelly Castell

This year marks the eighth annual German bake-off for the Lawrence Centralized Kindergarten. The Heidelberg Cafe, Bakery, and Gift Shop hosts the four-day program when 800 enthusiastic children take part in baking 600 pounds of cookies. Heidelberg's owner, Juergen Jungbauer, scheduled 45 minute sessions, due to the total number of students and in order to accommodate one class at a time. According to Teachers' Assistant Mrs. Burks, "Mr. Jungbauer has got it down to a science."
The program begins for each class with a tour through the antique bakery museum (while the preceding class finishes in the kitchen and prepares to depart). Once in the kitchen, each child is allotted his own cookie dough to cut, bake, and decorate. While the cookies are baking, the children participate in the art of decorating cakes. Lead by Jungbauer, wearing a hat which appears to be that of a chicken - with slipper-shoes to match, the children engage in the German Chicken Dance. "The kids love the dance," said Jungbauer.
After the eventful class, the children have a lot to show from their unforgettable experience. Each child takes home his decorated cookies, one German penny, and two photographs. Despite the public service for the 800 kids, Jungbauer regrets that they cannot have all area schools in for the occasion. "I look forward to it every year. It's a great experience for everyone," he said.
Pictures

Bakery and Deli Buy-Line
Retailer of the Month Heidelberg Haus
March 1994
by Gary Gardener

December 1993 marked the 25th anniversary of Heidelberg Haus Bakery and Gift Boutique. In 1968, Juergen Jungbauer purchased a small bakery on Pendleton Pike in Indianapolis. JJ had just ended his tour of duty with the United States Army at Fort Harrison, where he was a Chef at the officer's club.
No one would recognize the bakery today. Over the years, JJ and his wife Gabi have expanded the building several times to accommodate the growth of their business. When you enter, you walk into an authentic German Cafe. Tables are mixed between the large selection of German gifts, ranging from beer steins to Lederhosen. In addition to counter seating, private rooms are available for small parties. An antique baker in one corner of the shop adds atmosphere and sparks a lot of conversation.
Heidelberg Haus is open for breakfast and lunch, and its especially known for it's authentic European pastries, tortes, and breads and rolls. The fresh bakery products are produced in a bakery located immediately behind the gift shop.
JJ and Gabi have created a very unique business, and each thoroughly enjoy their work. This is exemplified by their commitment to the Lawrence Community. For the last ten years's, JJ hosts 900 Kindergarten students from the Lawrence Community School System. Each year students arrive in groups of about twenty and surround one of the large baker's tables. They then proceeded to make their own decorated cookies. After tasting their creations, they return to school with their bag of treats and many fond memories. Many say that this is the best field trip they ever experience.
The German language video center is JJ's most recent business enterprise. He copies German language videos and films, and distributes them throughout the United States. This business is located in the most recent building addition immediately behind the bakery.
As you can tell, Heidelberg Haus is a vivid example of how a bakery has evolved and adapted to changing times and opportunities. Visit the Heidelberg Haus for breakfast or lunch or merely to browse through the gift shop. It will be a very enjoyable and memorable experience. The bakery and gift shop is located just est of I 465 at 7625 Pendleton Pike.
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The Indianapolis News
Kids have a ball making cookies
Thursday, February 17, 1994
By Paul Bird

Lawrence Centralized Kindergarten students put cookies on sheets before baking them at Heidelberg Cafe & Bakery on Pendleton Pike.
Children squealed with glee, clapped their hands, howled with laughter and performed the chicken dance while eating all the cookies they wanted. Lawrence Centralized Kindergarten Teacher Sue Brown didn't try to stop them. In fact, she shamelessly joined in.
The response pleased Juergen Jungbauer, known to the children and his customers as "J.J., the Happy Baker," owner of Heidelberg Cafe & Bakery, 7625 Pendleton Pike. With a fast-paced presentation similar to a vaudeville comedian's , Jungbauer entertained the 28 kindergartners for nearly an hour at his place of business.
This was not a field trip where the children were told to be quiet, keep their hands to themselves and stay clean.
To the contrary. Jungbauer took control of the children with his happy foolishness that encouraged them to yell responses to his questions. The bakery visitors grab on to every word he said while following his instructions.
During the visit, the children learned old German baking techniques and saw various instruments used in the European bakery.
Jungbauer, a world-class pastry chef, also showed them the milk can he carried as a boy to the dairy store daily for fresh milk. Then Jungbauer moved the children into the "kitchen" to do a little baking themselves.
As they entered the room, each child received a bakers's hat with his name written on one side and an apron. Each hat had a number that corresponded with a number on a baking sheet. In a flash, J.J. began throwing flour across a huge table where the children had gathered. Next, each child was given a square of cookie dough. "Do not roll it, squeeze it or sit on it," the baker said. The children laughed.
Dozens of cookie cutters were passed among the group, with instructions to cut as many cookies as possible from the dough. Melted butter was presented, with instructions to use the "paint brushes" to paint the new shapes. "Here's the sprinkles," Jungbauer said. "Use lots of sprinkles.
The dough was placed on the cookie sheets and the sheets were slid into the oven. When the waiting was over, hundreds of cookies were available for consumption.
"Eat lots of cookies because they are brain fooled and make you very smart," Jungbauer said. Jungbauer then showed the children how to decorate a cake and make yummy-looking red pastry roses with seven quick twists of his wrist. The children counted each move.
The Happy Baker disappeared for 15 seconds and then reappeared wearing a chicken-shaped hat on his head. A brown egg dangled from the rear of the hat. With a few instructions, the visitors learned the "Chicken Dance" and were clucking, flapping their wings and wiggling their rears to a recorded song.
After dancing, Jungbauer posed for photographs with the group. Each child eventually will receive two prints.
Jungbauer estimates the number of children who have visited his bakery at nearly 10,000. "I love it," Jungbauer said. "Every cluck."
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The Lawrence Township Journal
Wednesday, December 29, 1993
Heidelberg Cafe celebrates 25th anniversary

by Kelly Castell

What began as a German bakery 25 years ago, has become a meeting place for Germans and Americans from many neighboring cities. The quaint Heidelberg Bakery, Cafe and Gift Shop, at 7625 Pendleton Pike, draws regular customers from as far as Cincinnati, Ohio, on a weekly basis. "I've seen the same faces for 25 years, " said the owner, know to all as JJ. "People come here to unwind and socialize."
Juergen Jungbauer, or JJ, is a main attraction himself. He is known nationally for his work as a pastry chef and has acquired many trophies - some of which are on display. One wall is covered in newsprint articles from various cities to commemorate JJ's fabulous work and contributions.
Memorabilia representing different cultures appears throughout the building. German antiques are abundant, and the presence of a jukebox provides a large selection of German background music.
JJ began baking at 14 years old, the age at which Germans are expected to learn a trade. JJ continued as a pastry chef in the Army for two years when he was drafted to Lawrence's Fort Harrison. With the inception of the Heidelberg Bakery in 1968 J.J. supplied 700 pastries every Sunday for the army base.
Another tradition began when J.J.'s daughter was in Kindergarten nine years ago. As area schools often visit the German shop, so do 800-900 students for an annual baking event. The field trip allows children to participate in a baking "class", resulting in 600 pounds of home-made cookies and 800 diplomas. J.J. leads the kids in dances, such as the German Chicken Dance, while singing popular German songs. The kids also learn how to yodel.
The cafe thrives on a very limited German menu which has not changed in 25 years, and concentrates primarily on pastries, cakes and pies. Of the 23 employees, there are three bakers other than J.J., with the capability between them to prepare up to 50 different cakes. However, wholesale baked goods are not available. Cakes are sold whole, or by slices as a German tradition. The business has expanded with three additions to the building. According to J.J., the cafe is now a small part of the business. Inspired by the concept of America's drug store, as "many stores in one," J.J. added a gift shop and grocery. Items are imported from Germany, with single items purchased to meet special individual requests. The grocery sells such foods as jams, syrups, and chocolates. The gift shop sells anything imaginable. Unique products include a hand-painted Russian doll series. The dolls are currently inexpensive to produce, and therefore to purchase, but are expected to be more valuable as labor costs increase. The Heidelberg's biggest success in the gift shop has been in German mail-order videos. Over 50,000 catalogs are mailed out, and videos are advertised in German newspapers and sent all over the world.
The Heidelberg has not done any advertising in 15 years. According to J.J., "Nobody comes in here by mistake. It is like home." As a family business, it is home to J.J.'s wife, Gabi, and daughters Angela, Tanya, Heidi, and Corina.
J.J. also is approaching his sixth year hosting "German Hour" on WSYW radio (810 AM), Sundays from 1-2 p.m.
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Lawrence Township Journal
Lawrence holds very successful July 4 Festival
July 13 - 14, 1993

Juergen "J.J." Jungbauer of the Heidelberg Cafe, won "Best Motorized Vehicle" award. Lawrence Mayor Thomas Schneider presents "J.J." with the award.

The Lawrence Township Journal
Jungbauer among the honored at MSD meeting
Wednesday, February 5, 1992

The house was packed!! There was standing room only!! Many were already standing when it was time to offer a standing ovation!
No, this was not a John Cougar Mellencamp concert. Nor was it the courtroom where Mike Tyson is on trial. This crowd was on hand at the Metropolitan School District of Lawrence Township's monthly School Board meeting. What had they come to witness?
The highlight of the entire event was the presentation of the Superintendent's Award to Mr. and Mrs. Jungbauer. Juergen and Gabi Jungbauer were recognized for their tremendous contribution to the Centralized Kindergarten youngsters. Since 1986, the Jungbauer's have welcomed over 700 students, 28 separate classes of boys and girls to their restaurant, Heidelberg Cafe/Bakery. There, the students don aprons and baker's hats as they learn how his business operates by having the opportunity to prepare over 400 pounds of cookie dough for consumption. The children learn about the antique bakery equipment, eat dough, cut out and bake cookies, and enjoy yodeling and the famous "chicken" dance Mr. Jungbauer states, "All the work and trouble is worth it. The kids hug and squeeze me when they see me in my bakery or in the community. They ask me if I remember their names and of course I say yes." The past three years over 2,100 students have visited the Jungbauer's Bakery.
Dr. Percy Clark Jr. stated, "It's the community support and interaction like this that makes all the difference for our children."
Other business handled at the school Board meeting following the recognition segment: Barbara Stryker, Principal of the Centralized Kindergarten, presented her plans for program development in preparation for the combining of the Lawrence North and Lawrence Central Kindergarten program: Dr. Ed Williams, assistant superintendent for Panning and Plant Operations, presented plans for providing two-way transportation for kindergarten students.
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Video Store, National Video Magazine
Scratch that Niche
January 13 - 17, 1992

Juergen Jungbauer is one video retailer who is not afraid to grab onto a Chunk O'the Market and never let go. Since 1983, he's been the owner of the German Language Video Center in Indianapolis, Ind.
He runs, he says, the only place in the United States that has German language videos for sale and rent. (The real stuff. From Germany.) He says his approximately 700 titles do a brisk rental and see through business across the country thanks to his 80-page catalog and rent-by-mail business.
"We ship them all over the nation," Jungbauer says. "We do a good business in what you would call 'Country Folks' films from the '60s - the carefree years. We've got all the classics, no New Wave stuff."
He says his customers are mostly the older German population between 40 and 70-years-old who are nostalgic for "the good old days" of German cinema.
"Also, a German-speaking person does not like subtitles," he explains. "All the new stuff, the Fassbinder and the like, all have subtitles. So there's not a big demand, at least in my company, for those.
Jungbauer says his store carries no Esperanto videos, although his brother in Germany is fluent: "In Germany it has a lot of fans. Here in America we just assume everybody speaks English no matter where we go," he says. "In Germany, Esperanto is a nice language; it's easy to learn and it would be a perfect language for worldwide communications.
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Indianapolis Monthly
December 1991

The Pastry Counter at Heidelberg Cafe
Best Culinary Cultural Experience - 1991
By Jack Marsella
Dear "Best" Winner:
Indianapolis Monthly is happy to present you with a "Best of Indianapolis" certificate as a result of our December 1991 Eighth Annual Best & Worst Awards.
It is companies/individuals like you that strive to improve our city, and we hope to display your 1991 award proudly and prominently.
Sincerely,
Deborah Paul, Publisher/Editor
Jack N. Marsella, Publisher/Advertising Director

The Indianapolis Star
Writing the model itinerary for Claudia's visit
Thursday, August 8, 1991

By Betsy Harris, Star Fashion Editor
When supermodel Claudia Schiffer hits town Friday, she won't need an agenda. We've got her visit all mapped out.
Claudia Schiffer surely has enough guesswork in her peripatetic life. So The Indianapolis Star has decided to help out the tousle-haired cover girl when she blows into town Friday for a weekend appearance at L.S. Ayres.
Schiffer also indulges in a little wicked something - although you might not believe it if you saw her lithe body stretched out on the July cover of Cosmopolitan. She likes chocolate.
And Juergen Jungbauer, owner of the Heidelberg Cafe, says he has just what she craves. Claudia can choose from 60 different kinds of German chocolate bars at the cafe and bakery on Pendleton Pike. She and Jungbauer can also speak a bit of Deutsch together.
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Abendpost und Milwaukee Deutsche Zeitung
A Great Place To Visit!
The German Language Video Center
Freitag, 26. Juli 1991

When you visit not only will you be able to pick up your favorite German video but you can enjoy a tantalizing German meal. Some of the Menu items: German style Bratwuerste, Kassler Rippchen (hot or cold) German style Wienerwuerstchen ("two German style hot dogs with potato salad and bread and butter"), German Knockwurst (one with bread and butter), German style Fleischkaese (with potato salad, bread and butter), Leberwurstbrote or Mettwurst open face sandwich (two slices German bread with butter and liversausage, pickle and potato chips), Lachsbrot open face sandwich (on German rye bread with butter, imported smoked salmon (saithe and potato salad), corned beef, and roast beef or pastrami (sandwich on rye with chips). Don't pass up dessert they make their own.
As I browsed, I noticed Lederhosen, Dirndl dresses, German records, magazines, language video tapes, imported and domestic cards, music boxes, cuckoo clocks, jewelry, authentic Hummel figurines, porcelain beersteins, Oberammergau wood carvings and many more German items for sale.
The Jungbauer's friendliness and hospitality warmed my heart. I recommend this trip to everyone.
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The Indianapolis Star
German fare's delicious and, oh, those pastries!
Friday. June 28, 1991

By Steve Mannheimer, Star Staff Writer
Eastside cafe doubles as a souvenir shop with authentic German items.
The Cafe Heidelberg Bakery and Gift Shop splits its business between kitsch and kitchen. Its winding aisles are stocked with hundreds of touristy souvenirs and products of der Vaterland, from Black Forest gnomes to lederhosen to freeze-dried sauerbraten.
The friendly German ladies behind the lunch counter serve up a small but oh-so-delicious menu of knack-, brat- and wienerwuerstchen and such and dispense the treasures of the well-ladened pastry cases.
Boffo 'brats' - My wife and I very, very much enjoyed our lunch at the Heidelberg. It could as easily have been dinner; the menu doesn't change. We sampled the German-style bratwuerste for $4.25, the lachsbrot open-face sandwich for $4.50 and the German-style fleischkaese for $2.95. Each main dish came with potato salad, pickle spears and bread.
The two big 'brats' were mildly seasoned, grilled just right. The lachsbrot sandwich was four narrow slices of dense bread topped with salty, imported smoked salmon (lax), onion and hard-boiled egg sections. The fleischkaese, much like bologna, came warm in two thick slices.
I a word, everything was gut, as in "Guten Appetit," the motto of the one-page menu. The meats were flavorful, tender and juicy. The potato salad was spicy and the bread was thick and fresh-baked with a fat pat of sweet butter.
And everything was perfectly set off by the militant German mustard, strong enough to make a grown man groan.
Small menu, big impact - Choosing dessert from the large array of pastries, cookies and cakes was a challenge. My wife had a big, frosted chunk of a rich, fragrant apple spice cake; I had the apricot cheese cake, each under $2 and both delicious.
Basically, the Heidelberg is good for lunches of coffee breaks. The menu is a small case study of how to achieve the greatest gustatory impact with the least culinary variety: What they do, the do very, very well.
The whole operation is rather casual, somewhat reminiscent of the old-fashioned Mom and Pop corner grocery/deli counter.
Clean and friendly - It's the customer's job to alert the waitress to your arrival and finally step up to the register to pay the bill. But the place is spotlessly maintained, and everyone is quite friendly. Bottom line, with iced tea, coffee and one surprisingly tasty non-alcoholic German beer and tip: about $9 each.
The superabundance of German Schtuff may be a tad off-putting for some folks, but apparently is a real attraction for all the people at nearby Fort Benjamin Harrison who acquired a taste for it overseas.
An anyone can acquire a taste for this food. Pictures

The Lawrence Times
February 6, 1991
By Susan Miller, Topics staff writer

Juergen Jungbauer, owner of Heidelberg Haus bakery and cafe, isn't merely a baker or purveyor of German goods to his scores of loyal clientele, but a proponent of the old country.
They come to the Heidelberg not only for the traditional German coffee klatsch, German pastry and luncheon foods, German magazines, greeting cards and other products, but for the memories of their homeland that being there invokes.
Jungbauer started his training as a pastry chef in his home town of Karlsruhe, Germany when he was 14 years old. While learning a trade in Germany, students spend three years going to school two days a week and working five days.
Jungbauer was working on a German ship as a pastry chef in 1963 when a New York nightclub owner took such a liking to Jungbauer's pastries enough to offer him a job and sponsor him to come to America.
In 1966, he was drafted into the United States Army and sent to Fort Benjamin Harrison to be trained as a finance clerk. After two weeks of training which he says was "a disaster," the army reassigned him to duty at the Fort Harrison Officer's Club as a pastry chef.
"I had a really good time," Jungbauer said. "I had no reveille, no fall out and I only had to wear my uniform four times which was the four times I was promoted. He stayed in the army an extra two months to bake a cake for a retiring colonel. Just before Jungbauer was discharged, he bought Paul's Bakery and Fitch's Meat Market located next to each other on Pendleton Pike.
"I knocked a hole in the wall to connect them and started to build shelves. I was very scared because I was all alone and had no help. Some German women saw the sign I had put up outside that said 'German Bakery Opening Soon' and came to offer their help."
Jungbauer said his first two years as a business owner were rough and he may not have made it without the help of the German women and Carl Ziegler, who sold his southside bakery and came to work for Heidelberg Haus. Others told him that to succeed in the Indianapolis market, he would have to sell pie and hot cross buns among other things. "I didn't know pie or hot cross buns," Jungbauer said. "I knew German food so that's all I sold. Those people who told me this are now all out of business and I'm still here. I've had the same menu for 22 years and the only thing that has changed are the prices."
Jungbauer met his wife, Gabi, who was also born in Germany, when her mother came to work for him. "It was love at first sight," he said. Over the years, their family grew in size as four daughters were born and raised in the bakery. "They teethed on the heels of rye bread," Jungbauer said. A photo wall in the Haus documents the changes the family underwent year after year.
Every spring Jungbauer hosts the kindergarten classes from Lawrence Central and Lawrence North for a lesson in German baking. "I would like to offer this to more children, but we just can't," he said. "For two weeks our bakers can do nothing during normal working hours and our normal demands continue." The children are each outfitted with an apron and a baker's hat and given a mound of dough to make German cookies. Besides baking, the children learn a German chicken dance and Jungbauer teaches them to yodel. He becomes very animated when talking about children and he proudly shows off the letters they have sent him and the drawings they have made of his bakery.
For 22 years people have been coming to Heidelberg Haus, not just for the German experience, but for the warmth of the people inside.
3 large Pictures , 3/4 page

German Christmas Music on Christmas Eve
on Indianapolis Radio

December 24, 1990
It has been the tradition over the past several years to broadcast "Christmas on the Rhine" on WAJC - FM 104.5 This program is hosted by WErner Kriegsmann, host of "Music Land Germany." This year Juergen Jungbauer of the Heidelberg Haus is joining this tradition with one hour of "Traditional German Music" on WSYW - AM 810 and FM 107.1. Juergen Jungbauer is the host of"Musik aus Deutschland" and "Kaffeeklatsch" Sundays at 3:00 PM onWSYW - 810 AM and FM 107.1. We invite you to join us on Christmas Eve. With our special Christmas programs of "German Holiday Music"we express our thanks for your loyal support during the past year. "Froehliche Weihnachten und ein glueckliches neues Jahr" wuenscht Ihnen Ihr deutscher "Discjokey" Juergen Jungbauer. Please tune-in to our regular Sunday programs 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

 

Indianapolis Star
Friday, November 23, 1990
By Rita Rose, Star Staff Writer

Heidelberg, Hollywood's Attic offer alternative video sources
The German Language Video Center, located at the Heidelberg Haus restaurant and gift shop on the Far Eastside of Indianapolis, has issued its 1991 catalog of German and Austrian films for rent or sale. Most titles are in German - no subtitles; a few have English subtitles. All are VHS, which have been digitally transferred for play on American VCRs.
Categories are folklore, documentary, cartoons, comedies, travelogues and classics. Cost for each catalog is $1. For information, call (317) 547-1257. The center is located at 7625 Pendleton Pike.

INDIANAPOLIS STAR
Memories cloud news of Germany
Pair recall escapes from communism
Thursday, October 4, 1990
By Rex Redifer

It is a happy-sad time for the tow friends. They sit hunched over coffee at the Heidelberg Haus on Wednesday afternoon. Their voices, their faces flicker with emotion - their eyes bright, joyous this minute, suddenly clouding with tears the next.
They try to sort out their feelings, but their thoughts range from giddy to heavy as they search in choppy accents for the right words - in German, in English, in German again. "You wouldn't know, you wouldn't want to know," Inge Smith murmurs. "No. Nobody... nobody would." "It was awful ... terrible," Rita Robinson says, gesturing with her hands. "I love this country. Love it," Smith says, "but my heart returns home today."
The two - both native Germans who married U.S. soldiers - are sitting in the Cafe Heidelberg Bakery & gift Shop at 7625 Pendleton Pike in Lawrence. Manager Hildi Royal and Waitress Christa Rodgers of the Heidelberg Haus, are busy. Dressed in native dirndl dresses, they smile and laugh as they serve free cake and coffee. Their beloved fatherland, Germany - wounded, scarred, split and shattered - has become whole again after more than 40 anguished years. It is a memorable, marvelous oom-pah-pah, polka kind of day. Except. The two friends can't forget. They are reliving 1945, when they were 16 years old in a war-torn, devastated Germany.
"It was January 21st, 1945. It was about 8 a.m.," Smith recalls. "The Russians had come. We lived in Salved in the Russian zone. Me, my mother, my two sisters and a brother were trying to get to Hamburg. We got aboard a cattle train. There was no food. It was cold; we were hungry. We were scared. "Everything was demolished. Russian soldiers were everywhere. Everywhere was shooting, by air, by land, everyone killing..." She describes how they traveled for days aboard the train, stopping, waiting, freezing. "Old people, babies died," she says. "They were tot weak to survive. They threw them off the train into the snow... "Everyone would have died except the American helicopters dropped food and medicine. The Russians gave us nothing." They arrived in Hamburg after five days, more dead than alive. They stayed there until 1947 then went to Cuxhafen, where she met a U.S. soldier from Indianapolis, William Smith, and they were married. He was a career soldier. When he retired, they moved to Indianapolis and became permanent residents in 1973.
Robinson was not so lucky. "We did not escape the Russians. I was in Werder, near Potsdam. We tried to escape, but the road was jammed. Robinson escaped eventually. But, Robinson explains, she couldn't stay. "I went back to get my 3-year-old sister. We hid in the woods for two days - she crying and hanging on my skirt, we had nothing to eat - before I could get her across the border and leaver her with friends. I snuck back and forth across the border 12 times to bring across family and friends. Each time I thought I would be shot. It was terrible. One time I gave a man piece of bread. It turned out to be my father. I didn't even recognize him, he was so drawn and thin."
She, too, met an American - a captain from Oklahoma, Reeford Robinson, and they were married. They settled in Indianapolis when he was discharged from the Army at Fort Benjamin Harrison.
The two women met one day at the Cafe Heidelberg about 10 years ago. "We talked," Smith says, "and got in the habit of meeting here just about every day to have coffee and talk. There are others like us who join in. We are here, but our hearts in part remain there. It was, after all, home."

Washington Courier
Tuesday, December 12, 1989
By Debra Parks

Unique German gift shop now open in Lawrence
This week begins the twenty-first year of Heidelberg Haus. The cafe as well as the buildings are truly landmarks in Lawrence, attracting customers from many miles away.
To celebrate their 21st year, owners J.J. and wife Gabi have a big surprise for you - the opening of the Bavarian Nutcracker Haus! For superbly unique gift ideas, the Bavarian Nutcracker Haus offers thousands of items (all imported) for you to choose. You'll be astounded at the selection of beer steins, nutcrackers, dolls and ornaments.
Gabi told me that they buy direct from several German companies, eliminating the so known 'middle man' and are able to offer you fantastic prices on top quality products.
Last Saturday, WSYW-FM 107, broadcast live from the Bavarian Haus, from 1 to 4 p.m. Director of Community Broadcasting, Bert James, invited listeners to come in and receive a free gift. By two o'clock there was standing room only as folks came in from Nora, Greenwood and all parts of Indianapolis, awed by the beautiful displays.
For the best in German food, it's the Heidelberg Haus, whether your fancy is bratwurst, coffee klatsch, pastries, cakes, pork chops, wieners or alcohol-free beer. But, for that special gift, you must stop by the Bavarian Nutcracker Haus, located suit east of the Heidelberg. There is plenty of parking, allowing easy access to both buildings.
J.J. boasts the exclusive rights in North America to sell German language videos. He carries thousands of titles, all in German. You may purchase the videos through the mail or by going to the store. Some videos are also available for rent. You may contact J.J. for more information about this unique service. Schools, universities and individuals are among his regular clients.
Each year, abut 850 lawrence kindergartners from lawrence Central and Lawrence North receive a lesson from J.J. They learn how to make cookies. "I look forward to doing this," said J.J. "Keep in mind though," he chuckled, "that's 850 aprons, 850 hats..."

The Lawrence Township Journal
Wednesday, December 6, 1989
By: Debra Parks

This week begins the twenty-first year of Heildeberg Haus. The cafe as well as the building are truly landmarks in Lawrence, attracting customers from many miles away.
To celebrate their 21st year, owners J.J. and wife Gabi have a big suprise for you - the opening of the Baverian Nutcracker Haus! For superbly unique giftideas, the Baverian Nutracker Haus offers thousands of item (all imported) for you to choose. You'll be astounded at the selection of beer steins, nutcrakers, dolls, and ornaments.
Gabi told me they buy direct from several German companies, eliminating the so known 'middle men' and are able to offer you fantastic prices on top quality products.
Last Saturday, WSYW-FM 107, broadcast live from the Bavarian Haus, from 1 to 4 p.m. Director of Community Broadcasting, Bert James, invited listeners to come in and recieve a free gift. By two o' clock there was standing room only as folks came in from Nora, Greenwood and all parts of Indianapolis, awed by the beautiful displays.
For the best German food, it's the Heidelber Hau, wether your fancy is bratwurst, coffe flatsch, pastries, cakes, pork chps, wieners, or alcohol-free beer. Nutcracker Haus, located just east of the Heidelberg. There is plenty of parking, allowing easy access to both buildings.
J.J. boasts the exclusive rights in North Americato sell German language videos. He carries thousands of titles, all in German. You may purchase the videos trough the mail or by going to the store. Some videos are also available for rent. You may contact J.J. for mor information about this unique service.
Picture 1: WSYW 107FM, Bert James chats on the air with J.J. dressed in traditional lederhossen and wife, Gabi, wearing dirndles from the Black Forest region.

Indianapolis Star
German - American Cheer Events
November 11, 1989
By: Bill Roberts

Amid laughter, reverly and champagne, Jeurgen L. Jugnbauer and his employees toasted the end of the Berlin Wall. Jungbauer, proprietor of the Heildeberg Cafe and Bakery at 7625 Pendelton Pike, exclaimed amid the jubilation. "This is super. We're all ecstatic." " This is abour the nicest thing that has happened in my lifetime." On an outdoor sign at hte Northeastside landmark he has operated for 21 years was the message: "Freedom for all East Germany." "These people relize just how badly the Communists have screwed up the economy. East Germans hve been so oppressed. They have spent at least half of their lives standing in line trying to obtain things that deal with everyday life that we don't even think about." " They recive meat once a month, alittle fruit from Cuba. I talked to an East German collage professor who came to my store while visiting America who has been waiting 17 years to buy a new car." Jungbauer returned froma visit to West Germany two weeks ago and saw some of the first arrivals from East Germany. "Some were leaving EastEast Germany then through Hungary. They thought it was their one shot chance to escape." he said. His Wife, Gabi, and employees Inge Reichwien and Gerda Ring sipped champagne with glee as they discussed the sudden, unexpected turn of events in Europe.
"I think its fantastic," said Ring, who left East Germany in 1955, six years before the wall was constructed. "Those people have been waiting a long time to be free.
Reichwein said, " I am very happy. I have a stepbrother in East Germany. I was very surprised that the goernment opened the wall."
She said she believes that by 1992 East Germany and West Germany will merge into one nation.
"I really think that will come about through the Common Market and the European Community," she siad.
Jungbauer said, "I feel that the opening is permanet. But don't be surprised if some of these East Germans find life on the other side too hectic and too glamorousand go back. Remember, they are used to being taken care of from birth to death. I imagine many of them ar in total shock righ now."
He thinks the stumbling block in keeping the borders open would be if Russian leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev would fail with his more liberal policies.
"If that hard-noised stuff comes back in the Soviet Union, things could swing back in East Germany again to the oppressive way things were. That's why we are so interested that he succeeds at home," Jungbauer said.

Badische Neueste Nachrichten, Germany
Was man so hoert
Sonntag, 29. Oktober 1989

Zu einem Klassentreffen kam der gebuertige Karlsruher Juergen Jungbauer ueber den grossen Teich nach Karlsruhe. 30 Jahre hat der "Amerikaner" seine Schulkameraden nicht gesehen: "Es war ein grossartiges Wiedersehen", sagte er nach dem Treffen. Ein Wiedersehen wurde es auch fuer seine Mutter Maria Jungbauer, die an der Entwicklung ihres Sohnes in den USA regen Anteil nimmt. Der gelernte Konditor blieb naemlich, nachdem er jahelang seinen Beruf auf dem Schiff ausgeuebt hatte, in Amerika "haengen". Er eroeffnete in Indianapolis (Indiana) eine Konditorei und verkauft mittlerweile alle moeglichen "Souvenirs" an seine amerikanischen Mitbuerger - darunter auch Sissi-Videos, fuer die er die Vertriebsrechte in den USA erworben hat.

SAFETY BELT CONNECTION MAGAZIN #4
Lawrence proclaimed "Seat Belt City' for AABU
June, 1989

Lawrence Mayor Thomas Schneider proclaimed the city as "Seat Belt City" May 26 during the All American Buckle Up Week. A banner, sponsored by Coca-Cola Bottling Company, was hung over Pendleton Pike declaring the name change forthe day. Approximately 15 businesses along the roadway placed safety belt messages on their marquees reminding motorists to buckle up.
Picture test. One of the many Lawrence merchants who participated by posting buckle up messages in front of their businesses, this German bakery added a little humor to its sign. "Ja, ja, buckle up der sitzin belt."

Weekly Reader National Children Magazine
Let's Make Cookies
September 30, 1988

The cookies are almost ready to be baked.
The baker, Juergen Jungbauer, will put them in the oven.
Understandings: This man has a very special job. He is a baker. Every day he bakes cookies, breads, cakes, and many other delicious foods. He uses special tools to do his job.
full page Picture

The Perry Township Weekly, Indiana
Heidelberg Haus brings out the German in everyone
July 7, 1988
By Lisa Hullinger, editor

The first time I visited the German bakery (as we call it-actually named The Heidelberg Haus) was with PTW business manager Joyce Conrad in December of '86. She needed to purchase some marzipan for her son's Christmas package and I went along to see this place she had talked about so much.
I couldn't believe all the German goods this little store contains. Although I've never been to Germany, I'd have to imagine the Heidelberg has everything a German would need. For example, Lederhosen, Dirndl dresses, German records and magazines, language video tapes, imported and domestic cards, music boxes, cuckoo clocks, jewelry, authentic Hummel figurines, porcelain beersteins, Oberammergau wood carvings.. Are you getting the picture yet?
Of course the best is yet to come. We recently ventured there for lunch and boy, are we glad we did! Of course, since we both have German blood in us, we were familiar with the country's foods. But nothing had prepared us for what we experienced.
We had a bit of a problem getting someone to wait on us. The real problem being that the tables are spread throughout the store and are among the wares for sale. Finally, we caught our waitress' eye and ordered. It was a tough decision. Topping the menu was German style bratwuerste, "two delicious sausages with homemade potato salad, bred and butter." I've always like bratwurst, so I decided to try their version.
I was incredibly surprised. Unlike what I've bought at a grocery store, this was tender and juicy. I usually eat just one but I couldn't help myself. I ate both! The German potato salad was also excellent. It wasn't as sour as others I've tried. The homemade bread was dark rye and the butter was real. Two dill pickles also came with the order. Simply one of the most delectable meals I've ever had!
Joyce ordered Kassler Rippchen or a smoked pork chop which came with the same items I received. The chop could be cold or warm and Joyce asked that it be warm. It was the largest pork chop I've ever seen and needless to say, equally delicious (yes, Joyce and I traded bites!). She was as satisfied with her meal as I was with mine.
Other menu items included: German style Wienerwuerstchen (two German style hot dogs with potato salad and bread and butter), German knockwurst (one with bread and butter), German style Fleischkaese (with potato salad, bread and butter), Leberwurstbrote or Mettwurst open face sandwich (two slices German bread with butter and liversausage, pickle and potato chips), Lachsbrot open face sandwich (on German rye bread with butter, imported smoked salmon (saithe) and potato salad), corned beef, and roast beef or pastrami (sandwich on rye with chips).
There are also a host of pre-made convenience foods for those that lean towards American fare. Prices range from $4.50 to $1.20. They also sell German bread and rolls, cakes and torten.
For dessert, Joyce had a torte made of layered yellow cake (sliced very thin) and butter cream icing. She thoroughly enjoyed it, but after tasting mine, I decided my apple cheese was much tastier. The bottom layer was moist yellow cake, then a fresh apple and cinnamon mixture, topped with homemade cheesecake. It was delicious! Of course, there were many items to chose form such as chocolate rum balls, chocolate layered torten, Black Forest Cake, etc. They do have candy as well.
Joyce and I highly recommended the Heidelberg Haus for browsing and lunching. It was a bit out of the ordinary which is nice considering most of us frequent fast food places these days. The restaurant and bakery is located at 7625 Pendleton Pike, Indianapolis.

Lawrence Chamber of Commerce Newsletter
June-July, 1988
by Deborah Cafaro

Business Profile
Cafe Heidelberg. The name itself makes one think of a quaint cafe nestled in the Bavarian Alps. However, this cafe is not nestled in the Alps but is located right here in our very own city of Lawrence.
Started in 1968 by proprietor Juergen Jungbauer, the Cafe Heidelberg has earned a reputation as the best of its kind. JJ (as Mr. Jungbauer is known to those of us who have a hard time pronouncing his name) learned his trade at a business school in his native Karlsruhe, West Germany. Coming to the U.S. in 1963, he quickly earned a reputation as an excellent pastry chef and in 1966, when drafted into the Army, his reputation grew even more with his exposure to various military events and dignitaries. A master pastry chef, JJ has won many awards both nationally and internationally. Some of those awards include the Indiana Restaurant Association grand prize in Culinary Arts in 1967, Grand Award and Gold Medal in "Concept in Food", Culinary Arts Festival of Chicago in 1968, Food Service Executive Associations President's Award and numerous plaques and ribbons in various categories in 1968, and the Grand Merit Award, Culinary Arts Festival, in Cincinnati in 1968.
Located in its current location at 7625 Pendleton Pike since 1968, the Heidelberg Cafe has expanded over the years, not only in size but in product. Starting as a bakery and pastry shop, the business has added German groceries, and extensive gift selection, German dresses, and most recently, mail-order German video cassettes. Whether they are for a dessert and coffee or a full lunch, you'll be surrounded by autographed pictures of famous political figures and celebrities who have sampled Mr. Jungbauer's wares. While the customer base is primarily from Indiana and the contiguous states, Heidelberg also boasts customers from as far away as Japan, Puerto Rico, and South America.
On a personal level, JJ is married and the father of four daughters who attend Lawrence Township Schools. He maintains an involvement with the Lawrence Optimist Club and sponsors a local soccer team. His formula for success? Part of his success, he says, is owed to the fact that he doesn't use chemicals of synthetic additives and preservatives in his creations. The Lawrence Chamber of Commerce is proud to have Cafe Heidelberg located in our City.

Logansport Pharos-Tribune
Indianapolis, Associated Press
Sunday, June 6, 1988
Cookies And Children Make Inseparable Pair

Cookies - they're practically synonymous with kids. And when the two are combined at Heidelberg Haus for a cookie-baking session, the fun is impressive. Chef Juergen Jungbauer, owner of the far-Northeast side German bakery, gift shop and restaurant, presides over the outings when groups of 20 to 25 kindergarten-age youngsters visit. After viewing his collection of antique baking tools, the youngsters don aprons and paper chef's hats bearing their names. After a hand-washing session, they head for the kitchen. Concentration is intense as cutters hit the cookie dough. The shaped cookies go into numbered sections of baking sheets. Each child has his section number marked on his cap. After the cookies are lavishly decorated with colored candies, they go into the oven. And while the cookies are baking, it's time for fun.
At a wooden work table, Jungbauer manipulates a pastry tube, fashioning crimson roses to top a cake, then allows young volunteers to man the pastry tube. Their attempts to create roses are greeted with both shouts of encouragement and boots of derision by fellow bakers. Finished with frosting, they gather around accordionist Norman Gwaltney - a cake decorator doubling as entertainer - who yodels and plays polkas. After a few yodeling instructions, the kids loudly and gleefully demonstrate their own vocal talents. As the howling fades, they are instructed by the chief in dance steps. Wildly enthusiastic terpsichoreans wiggle fingers, flap arms, swish tails and clap, then happily link arms to circle in a typical polka, giggles continue during the photo session, in which Jungbauer snaps a picture to later present to the class. Finally weary dancers attack a large plate of cookies and glasses of cola. Still energized by the dance and music, the crowd must be simmered down and herded around a large table, a talk undertaken by teachers accompanying the group and bakery workers including Jungbauer's wife, Gabi.
While the children danced, bakery employees filled the 20-plus numbered bags with the baked cookies which now are claimed by the pint-sized bakers. They also receive certificates which authenticate their baking abilities. And at the door they're instructed to take a penny from the dish of coppers provided by their host.The kitchen gradually is emptied - and the quiet is overwhelming. How did these visits begin? Mrs. Jungbauer explains; "When one of our daughters was in kindergarten, she asked to bring some of her friends here to a cake-decoration session which my husband was conducting. But you can't invite just a few kids, so we asked the whole class."The outing was so successful that eventually other classes began visiting, and the custom was established. The schedule for this year already is filled. Pastry decorator Roger John is a 15-year employee, has helped with the visits since they began Baker Loretta Waldon, a newer employee, enjoys the fun as well as the work.
"The preparations are time consuming," Jungbauer admits. The cookie dough is made ahead and frozen, but it takes about an our's work to set out dough, decorations, baking sheets and bags, plus adding names to hats and certificates, and refreshment preparation. The chef shrugs off the time lost and the gift of approximately a half-pound of cookies to each child. "We have fun," he says simply. "The kids love it. What better way to spend an hour?"

The Indianapolis Star
Kindergarteners learn fine art of cookie-making
Wednesday, June 1, 1988

By Donna Knight, Star Staff Writer
Cookies - they're practically synonymous with kids. And when the two are combined at Heidelberg Haus for a cookie-baking session, the fun is impressive.
Chef Juergen Jungbauer, owner of the far-Northeastside German bakery, gift shop and restaurant, presides over the outings when groups of 20 to 25 kindergarten-age youngsters visit. After viewing his collection of antique baking tools, the youngsters don aprons and paper chef's hats bearing their names. After a hand-washing session, they head for the kitchen.
Concentration is intense as cutters hit the cookie dough. The shaped cookies go into numbered sections of baking sheets. Each child has his section number marked on his cap. After the cookies are lavishly decorated with colored candies, they go into the oven. While the cookies are baking, it's time for fun.
At a wooden work table, Jungbauer manipulates a pastry tube, fashioning crimson roses to top a cake, then allows young volunteers to man the pastry tube. Their attempts to create roses are greeted with both shouts of encouragement and hoots of derision by fellow bakers.
Finished with frosting, they gather around accordionist Norman Gwaltney - a cake decorator doubling as entertainer - who yodels and plays polkas. After a few yodeling instructions, the kids loudly and gleefully demonstrate their own vocal talents.
As the howling fades, they are instructed by the chef in dance steps. Wildly enthusiastic terpsichorean wiggle fingers, flap arms, swish tails and clap, then happily link arms to circle in a typical polka. Giggles continue during the photo session, in which Jungbauer snaps a picture to later present to the class.
Finally weary dancers attack a large plate of cookies and glasses of cola. Still energized by the dance and music, the crowd must be simmered down and herded around a large table, a task undertaken by teachers accompanying the group and bakery workers including Jungbauer's wife, Gabi.
While the children danced, bakery employees filled the numbered bags with the baked cookies which now are claimed by the pint-sized bakers. They also receive certificates which authenticate their baking abilities. And at the door they're instructed to take a penny from the dish of coppers provided by their host. The kitchen gradually is emptied - and the quiet is overwhelming.
How did these visits to the busy bakery begin? Mrs. Jungbauer explains: "When one of our daughters was in kindergarten, she asked to bring some of her friends here to a cake-decorating session which my husband was conducting. But you can't invite just a few kids, so we asked the whole class." The outing was so successful that eventually other classes began visiting, and the custom was established.
The already-filled schedule of visits this year takes up 3 1/2 days a week for the Jungbauers and their employees. Pastry decorator Roger John, a 15-year employee, has helped with the visits since they began. Baker Loretta Waldon, a newer employee, enjoys the fun as well as the work.
"The preparations are time
consuming," Jungbauer admits. The cookie dough is made ahead and frozen, but it takes abut an hour's work to set out dough, decorations, baking sheets and bags, plus adding names to hats and certificates, and refreshment preparation.
The chef shrugs off the time lost and the gift of approximate a half-pound of cookies to each child. "We have fun," he says simply. "The kids love it. What better way to spend an hour?"
His wife's explanation is, "He has four daughters of his own and loves kids."
Is all the trouble worth it? Yes, according to teacher Glenda Adams who has brought many groups of Lawrence Central kindergartners to the bakery. "Years later, I've had children tell me that they remember the fun they had 'When we went to that bakery.' It's an outing that really impresses them."

Chef Juergen Jungbauer show youthful bakers how to eggwash cookies.

Cookie cutters fly and sugar scatters as children line long wooden bakery tables to shape cookies which they will decorate for baking in the huge ovens at the German bakery. Their body English proves invaluable as youngsters stretch, lunge and peer at friends' efforts whole pursuing their culinary pursuits. Michael Stewart (left) gets an assist from chef Juergen Jungbauer in forming frosting roses for a cake.
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Welcome to Lawrence, Indiana
City Map of Lawrence, Indiana
June 1988
This map is produced to be of help to the citizens of Lawrence as well as to our visitors. I am pleased to participate in this way in greeting both our citizens and our visitors. To our visitors, we welcome you and hope that your stay will be pleasant. As an independent city located in the northeast portion of Marion County and adjacent to Indianapolis, we take pride in our community spirit and in the warmth of our hospitality. We hope that you will share and extend that positive spirit.
Sincerely, Thomas D. Schneider
International Flavor
The many cultures of the world come to Lawrence by way of the students and officers assigned to a tour of duty at Fort Harrison. Many families are bilingual and represent several cultures. Their experiences are filtered through the local school system. There are several oriental food stores and restaurants located in the Lawrence surrounding area. Mexican and Italian cooking are also in high favor. The Heidelberg Cafe-Bakery & Gift Shop in Lawrence sells a wide range of items imported from Germany, including authentic foods, apparel, books, magazines, records, videos and all sorts of gift items. An authentic German bakery museum is maintained there. Admission is free.

Lawrence Township Journal
Wednesday, April 27, 1988
Heidelberg Haus sponsors field trip for kindergarteners
The afternoon kindergarteners from Lawrence Central High School watch with fascination as Jay Jungbauer makes a rose for one of his famous cakes. The class was there last Monday as a field trip sponsored by the Heidelberg Haus Bakery.
Photo by Jeff Hyer.

 

THE LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP JOURNAL
Wednesday, November 25, 1987
Decorating a cake takes on a whole new meaning for these Oaklandon Elementary students, as they watch J.J. Jungbauer, owner of the Cafe Heidelberg. The students are from the fall Horizon Cooking class. Not only did students and teachers watch the cake to its full completion, but then they ate the product!

Indianapolis Ad-Courier
Tuesday, November 24, 1987
Decorating a cake takes on a whole new meaning for these Oaklandon Elementary students, as they watch J.J. Jungbauer, owner of the Cafe Heidelberg. The students are from the fall Horizon Cooking class. Not only did students and teachers watch the cake to its full completion, but then they ate the product!

Lawrence Township Journal
Wednesday, July 8, 1987
The Jungbauer's from the Heidelberg Bakery wave to the crowd from their 1916 Oldsmobile in the July 4th parade. Also included in the parade were several local businesses and the Lawrence Central Marching Band. Photo by Jeff Hyer, staff photographer.

 

Midwest Bakers Association
November 1986

MBA Member on TV
We have a celebrity in our midst! On September 25th, Juergen Jungbauer, owner of Cafe Heidelberg Haus in Indianapolis, appeared as a special guest on one of the final Jim Gerard Shows. Juergen, born and raised in Germany, became an apprentice baker at the age of fourteen in the old country. While in the service of our country and stationed at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Juergen became the pastry chef at the Ft. Benjamin Harrison Officers Club. However, he had always wanted his own small bake shop. At last, he bought out a whole antique bakery, inside and out, including the blocks and bricks, located in Miamisburg, Ohio. Juergen had it reconstructed in Indianapolis trying to create a nice atmosphere with the "old country feeling". He certainly has achieved his dream with Cafe Heidelberg Haus. The "great creator" as Jim Gerard refers to him, Juergen gave a brief demonstration of his art on the show.

The Indianapolis Star
International fest
October 25, 1986

Culture, music and food from around the world re making an appearance this week at the Indiana Convention Center. In all, the songs and dances from about 40 different cultures are represented with booths at the 11th annual International Festival, which continues through Sunday. Carolyn Watson (right) was in African costume for the occasion, while the Heidelberg Haus Gift Boutique was one of the local businesses selling foreign wares at the festival.
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left bottom picture text
Gabi Jungbauer, Inge Reichwein, Ella Bernschneider
text picture to the right top
Dancers Claire Mazewski and John Repulski represent the Polish Cultural Society
Text picture to the right bottom
A more contrasting clash of cultures is seen at the booth of the Taiwanese Association of Indianapolis booth, where children in sneakers and jeans don a dragon.

Midwest Bakers Association
October 10, 1986
MBA Member on TV

We have a celebrity in our midst! On September 25th, Juergen Jungbauer, owner of Cafe Heidelberg Haus in Indianapolis, appeared as a guest on one of the final Jim Gerard Shows. Juergen, born and raised in Germany, became an apprentice baker at the age of fourteen in the old country. While in the service of our country and stationed at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Juergen became the pastry chef at the Ft. Benjamin Harrison Officers Club. However, he had always wanted his own small bakeshop. At last, he bought out a whole antique bakery, inside and out, including the blocks and bricks, located in Miamisburg, Ohio. Juergen had it reconstructed in Indianapolis trying to create a niche atmosphere with the "old country feeling". He certainly as achieved his dream with Cafe Heidelberg Haus. The 'great creator' as Jim Gerard refers to him, Juergen gave a brief demonstration of his art on the show.

The Indianapolis Star
Sunday, September 21, 1986
WTTV4 presents the Jim Gerard Show

Jim Gerard Show Schedule Thursday from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Cafe Heidelberg's chef Juergen Jungbauer, who appeared on Jim's show eight times before, will create a sumptuous dessert and decorate a five-layer wedding cake, also appearing will be Jimmy McDaniels.

->->The Lawrence Township Journal
September 17, 1986
Optimist Club hears plans for Esquire Plaza Halloween Festival

Esquire Plaza Shopping Center Manager Kaye Kaye spoke last week to the Lawrence Optimist Club about the Center's plans for the third annual Halloween Festival. Kaye invited the Optimist Club to participate again in the festival, to be held Saturday, Oct. 25, with many activities the preceding week. She said approximately 500 children participated in the costume parade, window painting and pumpkin decorating activities, and more are expected to attend this year. Sammy Terry, local television host of spooky movies, is scheduled to be master of ceremonies again. Community organizations donated or provided at cost many of the prizes, refreshments and supplies, and 74 volunteers from the community helped make last year's festival a success, Kaye told the club. Two hundred pumpkins, 100 dozen doughnuts and 80 gallons of cider were donated last year. Cash contributions covered approximately one-fourth of the cost of last year's event. The 1985 Halloween Festival activities have been entered into Maxi-Award competition for community events held at shopping centers, Kaye said.
Picture: Esquire Plaza Shopping Center Manager Kaye Kaye (left) was guest speaker at the recent Lawrence Optimist Club meeting. Club President Herb Horton (right) and Program Chairman J.L. Jungbauer listen as Kaye explains plans for the annual Halloween Festival. The Lawrence Optimist Club was asked to participate again along with many other community groups.

The Indianapolis Star
German culture faithfully preserved here for the young
Monday, August 25, 1986
By Scott L. Miley

Today, residents with German ancestry make up the largest such group in the state - about 739,000 of Indiana's 5 million people.
"Seemingly, the Germans blend much faster in the mainstream of American people than most nationalities. There are no more urban streets where all the Germans live together and stay together, and so they're moving to suburban areas,: says Juergen Jungbauer, owner of Heidelberg Cafe and Bakery, 7625 Pendleton Pike.
Jungbauer, 43, emigrated form Europe in 1963. For 19 years, German has been spoken by customers and waitresses at his Northeastside bakery with its kaffeklatsch atmosphere. Four years ago, he began selling German language videotapes, ranging from feature movies to educational programs, at his cafe. The video business has been steady, he says. Jungbauer acknowledges that, little by little, German traditions erode. But he adds that the German spirit and desire to learn about one's past will kept the culture strong. "The days - like at the end of the last century when Germans lived together on the Southside - those days are over,: he says. "At German clubs now, at least 50 percent are people who don't speak German every day. They're American-born but still they like to keep the German heritage alive. It's a nice sign." Young people don't always show an interest in ancestry, which makes the parents' job more crucial, adds Mrs. Schroeder. She says, "This type of thing, for one reason, needs to be maintained or perpetuated because (children) are going to be 45, maybe 55, before they have a really strong interest in their background and their heritage. We have to have it for them when they become interested in it."
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Indianapolis Monthly
World Series
Indianapolis boasts a variety of restaurants that prove it's a small world, after all.
May 1986
By Marilyn Peachin

Ethnic
Heidelberg House. 7625 Pendleton Pike.
Juergen Jungbauer, German-born owner/chef of the Heidelberg House, first came to the attention of the Indianapolis scene in the mid-60s, when, as a young U.S. Army noncom, he took over as pastry chef at the Fort Benjamin Harrison Officers Club and began raking in culinary awards like so many autumn leaves. When he completed his army service in 1986, he opened his own bakery/restaurant on Pendleton Pike, and the rest is local history. Famous for his Black Forest cherry cake, dobos pastry and European cheesecake, Jungbauer also offers some 75 varieties of pastry and classic German rye bread and hard rolls. A limited luncheon menu, offered throughout the day at the Heidelberg's counter and eight tables, features kasslerripchen - smoked pork chops served with potato salad; lachsbrot - German smoked salmon presented in an open-face sandwich; bratwurst; and wienerwurst. Non-alcoholic Swiss beer is also available.

The Indianapolis Star
Pupils cook up a good time
Wednesday, February 12, 1986

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Juergen L. Jungbauer, bakery owner, said the pupils "really had a ball." Each child got a section of cookie dough to cut and decorate and a bag of cookies to take home. The pupils also toured the antique bakery museum, and Norman Gwaltney, a professional yodeler and baker, taught them a German "chicken dance" and gave them tips on yodeling.
Left top Picture
Gabi Jungbauer, wife of the owner of Heidelberg Haus, an Indianapolis cafe, gift boutique and bakery, helps Christopher Americonos, 5, glaze cookies. Christopher was among 220 pupils attending Lawrence Central Kindergarten who recently took a field trip to the bakery.
Bottom Picture
Angela Jungbauer, 5, daughter of Gabi and Juergen Jungbauer, and David Brinkmeyer, 5, both kindergartners at Lawrence Central, give each other a bite of the cookies they made. The teachers told Jungbauer they had not seen pupils have such a good time on a field trip in 25 years.

The Lawrence Ad-Courier
Tuesday, February 11, 1986
Lawrence Township kindergarten students visited Heidelberg Cafe, 7625 Pendleton Pike, last week to learn the art of baking. Juergen Jungbauer, owner of Heidelberg Cafe, let the students cut out and decorate cookies and put them in the ovens. Special tools, aprons and hats were made especially to accommodate the kindergarten students.

Unusual Group Visits Heidelberg Cafe
The Lawrence Township Journal May 24, 1985
by Mark Zainey

A group of gypsy-type bandits invaded the Heidelberg Cafe last Saturday, May 24. The Well-organized group managed to keep all of the employees busy during peak business hours.
The 6-7 minute ordeal left employees strung throughout the store. The ringleader was an older woman perhaps in her mid-sixties. According to Juergen Jungbauer, owner of the Cafe Heidelberg, a group of 5 men and 3 women came into his Pendleton Pike address and caused a commotion that distracted all of the employees as well as the customers in the store.
After a very short period of time, the older woman snapped her fingers and all left the store as quickly as they came in . More worried about shoplifting made the discovery of the actual backroom break-in undiscovered for more than 20 minutes.
One of the bandits had worked his way into the back room of the store without being seen. In that short period of time, the bandit pried open several desk drawers and removed cash and other valuable items. A false door in the back marked as an office but which was blocked was also attempted to be opened but could not because of shelves behind the door.
Jungbauer stated, "It all happened so fast, and we were more concerned about the shoplifting of some of our more expensive items in the store. We did not notice the back break-in for more than 20 minutes after the robbers had left.
"It was a very gutsy move for a group to make this kind of a show in broad daylight and with the store at capacity business," concluded Jungbauer.

Indianapolis Magazine
February 1984
by Randy Farhi

That Old Black Magic: A Guide to Coffee in Indianapolis
At 380 Million cups per day, coffee is America's favorite beverage. A recent trend has been towards using fine, fresh, whole beans. And Indianapolis, judging from drink offered by restaurateurs and products sold by retailers, is becoming a part of this trend.
Heidelberg Haus, 7625 Pendleton Pike, 547-1230 - L. Swiss nonalcoholic beer. German cuisine. Counter/table serve. Av. din.: $3-5. Quaint, cluttered German cafe offers epicurean imports, German artifacts and an antique bakery museum. Real German Wienerwuerstchen und Bratwuerste made in Indianapolis and served on dark rye bread. Limited menu of German lunches. Specialty: national award-winning French pastries and Austrian tortes. Open Sun 11 am - 5 pm, Mon - Sat 9 am - 7 pm, MC, V.
Cafe Heidelberg is, in a wonderful and delightful way, overwhelming to enter. The owner stresses that it is in the European tradition and thus not given to a large bill of fare or extensive table service. Owner Juergen Jungbauer is gleeful about his coffee and the proper ambience for his cafe. He has, he says, switched coffee types perhaps as many as sic times in the 15 years he's owned Cafe Heidelberg in an attempt to get it just right. "I'm still looking for that magic coffee - really mellow and thick and steamy. Maybe it's just in my mind," he says.
But his cappuccino and espresso )(at $1.25 and 85 cents respectively) are good.
The store is unmistakable from the road; a large mural of a German family in the country dominates one wall. Inside, paintings by the same artist cover most surfaces, such as the side of a water fountain and restroom doors. For sale are cookies, cards, candies, candles, chocolates, cake mixes, jewelry, kitchen utensils, plaques, plates, mugs, steins, peanut butter, magazines and more. Jungbauer tries to offer "everything a German customer would like," and he believes in providing a "feast for the eyes" for diners, shoppers and browsers.
About 1968, Jungbauer, stationed at Fort Benjamin Harris during his military service, drove by the once empty storefront and decided it would be ideal for his bakery and cafe. Cafe Heidelberg is expanding and will feature a larger bakery. This description doesn't begin to tell all there is to see at Cafe Heidelberg. You've got to experience it for yourself.
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The Lawrence Courier Journal
Heidelberg Cafe celebrates 15th Anniversary
Monday, December 12, 1983
By Bonnie Kingsbury

Are you looking for a little piece of Germany? A European style cafe to have a cup of coffee and conversation? A German general store? A German bakery? A place to make new friends? Well the Heidelberg Haus, 7625 Pendleton Pike, is all of these rolled into one.
Juergen Jungbauer, or "J.J." as he's called by friends and customers, is the owner of Heidelberg Haus, and he celebrated his 15th anniversary in business last Thursday.
The Heidelberg Haus started out as a small European bakery on Dec. 8, 1068 and has grown into a thriving business which includes the original bakery, a cafe and a "German general store" as J.J. calls it.
But to understand the business, you have to know the man. J.J. was born in Karlsruhe, Germany, in the Black Forest. His grandfather owned a restaurant in Bavaria, and his father had a sausage shop in Karlsruhe.
Since both of his brothers decided to work in the sausage business, J.J. opted to learn his trade as a konditor (confectioner). At the age of 14, he began learning his trade, and after three years, he became a member of the 200-year-old Konditor guild.
The Konditor Guild historically was a trade which coated bitter pills for pharmacists and eventually went through the process of making candles, sugars and small cakes to become the art that it now is. J.J. said, "A konditor is an artist in the pastry field."
In 1963, J.J. was working on the German cruise ship SS Hanseatic as a pastry chef when he met Karl Hopple. After tasting his pastries, Hopple offered him a job in his Long Island nightclub. So, at the age of 19, J.J. came to America with $30 in his pocket to make his fortune.
After working for Hopple for 1 1/2 years, J.J. began to move around. He worked at the Hilton Hotel in Boston and in a guest lodge in Stowe, Vermont where the Kennedy family frequently stayed. While there, he made tarts for the Trapp family of "Sound of Music" fame who lived nearby.
He then moved to the West Coast, working in Sacramento, California and Tucson, Arizona until 1966 when he was drafted into the U.S. Army and sent to Ft. Lewis, Washington for basic training.
After basic, he was sent to Fort Benjamin Harrison to clerical school although he could barely speak English and kept insisting that he was a trained pastry chef.
After several weeks of shorthand classes and much frustration, he finally convinced an officer to let him show what he could do as a pastry chef.
Given a chance to show what he could do, he made what he called a "knock out" cake that was served tat a USO party downtown. After J.J. got so much publicity for his cake, Colonel B.B. Beck, post commander at the time, made J.J. the pastry chef at the Officers Club, and as J.J. says, "After that I had it made."
During his time as pastry chef at the Officers Club, J.J. participated in many local, state, and national food shows because, as he said, "The Army liked to show how good its food service was." He even flew to Washington, D.C. and set up a 60-foot sweet table on the floor of the Senate. A cake he made to serve 700 people for the 5th Army Headquarters in Chicago was written about in the Army Times. For the Sunday brunches at the Officers Club, he used to make big showpieces. One of his most memorable was an 8-foot Eiffel Tower made of sugar which took him three months to make. When he left Ft. Harrison, 300-400 people were coming to his Sunday brunches.
In 1968, one month before he was to be discharged, he noticed a building which had just been vacated by a local baker. Deciding that the Lawrence area would be a good place for him to start his own bakery because of all the publicity and followers he had earned at Ft. Harrison, he bought the bakery and the meat market next door and on Dec. 8, 1968 opened his own bakery.
He says his Ft. Harrison customers helped him a lot when he first started because "a lot of these people had been in Europe and knew what good pastries are."
And they are good pastries! J.J. remarked, "Pastry is a treat for your sweet tooth. It's almost like champagne: you eat it when you have the urge for it. It's not a basic food." Pastries, cakes and cookies are the specialty items of the Heidelberg haus, and they are baked fresh every day.
When J.J. started his business, he did all of the baking seven days a week. He now has four bakers who come in at 4, 6, 8, and 9 a.m. and 20 other full and part time employees, and he notes, "We're like a big family."
The small bakery through the years has expanded to include a cafe and a general store. J.J. said, "We are not a restaurant. We are a cafe. A cafe in Europe is a place where people exchange ideas and sit. That's what I like." At any time of the day, customers can be found at the small tables, drinking coffee, eating pastries, reading papers or conversing with patrons at other tables. J.J. said that he has a group of regular customers who are waiting for him to open in the mornings so they can have their coffee and Danish, read their papers and converse with their friends before going to work. It's a very relaxed atmosphere, and J.J. stated, 'We've made thousands of friends."
The general store is something that sprung from his friendly, relaxed atmosphere. Of the merchandise in the store, 90% of it comes from Germany. "We sell everything that people could expect from Germany," according to J.J. The array of merchandise is inspiring. He has German records, magazines and newspapers; German foods like cornstarch, dumpling mix and 60 different kinds of chocolate bars; German clothing, toys and even an antique German bakery. No wonder elementary school groups as well as high school German classes and clubs tour the store.
At the front door is a guest book with names of people from all over Indiana and the United States as well as Europe. Included among these signatures one could probably find that of former Governor Bowen, a frequent guest of Heidelberg Haus.
The Heidelberg Haus is open from 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. on Sundays, so if you ever have a spare hour or two, go visit. You can browse the store, looking at all the merchandise as well as pictures of J.J. with some of his famous creations; newspaper articles about J.J.'s cakes; letters and autographed pictures from the White House and other famous people; awards won by J.J., including the first Army Commendation award for baking and a letter from former Kentucky governor Wendell Ford making J.J. an official Kentucky Colonel. Or, or can just sit and enjoy coffee and a pastry and converse with the other patrons about world events. J.J. would love to have you stop by.
2 Pictures

->->American Turner Topics
May 1982
Sound Mind Sound Body
Indianapolis Athenaeum Turners Hold St. Benno Fest
More than 2,500 enthusiastic revelers enjoyed the annual St. Benno Fest held at the Athenaeum in Indianapolis, on two weekends this spring - March 12, 13, 19, and 20. The festivities, which began at 6 p.m. and continued until midnight were open to the public. Continuous music and dancing provided entertainment throughout the evening and featured such entertainers as the Ed Miller Bavarian Band and the Athenaeum Turners Orchestra. European folk dancing was performed by Dans Ethnic and a polka contest was held each evening for which prizes were awarded to the winners. There were numerous booths featuring a wide variety or arts, crafts and games. Buffet tables were laden with German and American foods and offered such delicacies as bratwurst, knockwurst, red cabbage, sauerkraut, sauerbraten, and delectable old world pastries were provided by the Old World German Heidelberg Bakery on Pendleton Pike.
The picture shows Juergen Jungbauer dancing with daughter Heidi.

The Indianapolis Times
On the Town Parties
St. Benno Fest at the Athenaeum
March 22, 1982
3 pictures showing Heidi Jungbauer, German Baker, Tanja Jungbauer, Gabi Jungbauer, Ella Bernschneider, Maria Kleber. dancing

 

Indianapolis News
Throw in the Towel
Thursday, December 24, 1981

Juergen Jungbauer, owner of the Heidelberg Haus on Pendleton Pike, gets a face full as he tries to drink from one of the world's largest beer steins. The stein is 48 inches tall and weighs 60 pounds. Only 20 of the German steins are made each year. The NEWS Photo, Tim Halcomb
1 Picture

The Lawrence Township Journal
Wednesday, December 16, 1981
Prosit,
it takes a lot of beer to fill the world's largest beer stein. Gabi and Juergen Jungbauer, owners of the Heidelberg Cafe and Gift Shop, 7625 Pendleton Pike, just got the big stein in from Germany. (If you want one of our own, be sure to save at least $2,000 - That is without the beer!!)

Indianapolis Business Journals
Pots of Color, Not Gold, for This Rainbow
September 7, 1981
By Chris Katterjohn

A Man with No Past Will tell You Tales of Life
Billy John Rainbow is a man without a past - at least one that he cares to talk about much. To him the past is just "extra baggage". And at 54, this artist is traveling light. Rainbow has few material possessions. What he has is time and talent and a desire to communicate with people.
His latest project can be found at the Cafe Heidelberg Bakery and Gift Shop, 7625 Pendleton Pike. In fact, his latest project is the cafe. Over the last one-and-a-half, two or three years (he doesn't seem to know exactly how long it's been), Rainbow has painted several interior doors of the cafe, the front facade and the entire expanse of the 10-foot-by-65-foot exterior west wall. The small mural on the front of the building depicts the Heidelberg Castle in Germany and the mural on the west side is filled with many different things, including landscapes, children, rivers and trees. His paintings depict happy bright, colorful scenes and as it turns out, that's part of the reason his name is now Rainbow. With a little Cherokee Indiana in his blood and a lot of Cherokee in his spirit, Rainbow tells the tale of how he changed his name from John William Higer. "Have you got 37 minutes?" he chortles. Though he shortened the story considerably, it is best left to in-person recital. True to his Indian heritage and nature, the artist lives on a spiritual level. When he discusses anything in depth, he does so with his eyes closed as if he were focusing in on concepts from a realm beyond.
For most of his large projects, Rainbow is given the freedom to pick the subject matter. But if a client has his own ideas, the artist is willing to negotiate. Rainbow explains, "I would rather leave the wall empty than trespass on somebody's dream." His latest project, the Heidelberg Cafe, was one which required some give-and-take. The cafe's proprietor, Juergen Jungbauer, first met the artist four years ago at Oktoberfest. He commissioned Rainbow to paint a 41-foot-by-five-foot mural as a backdrop for his "traveling" kitchen. Pleased with the results, he convinced Rainbow to work on his cafe. But the process has been a long one because this client, whose creativity can be seen in many of his super-extravagant cakes and pastries, had some ideas of his own. The two men worked together to determine the exact subject matter of the Heidelberg murals. There have been some volatile times. But the relationship, which has extended over four years now, has produced a mutual respect. Both men talk in wondrous terms about the genius and a talent of the other. Oftentimes, when he's not painting, says Jungbauer, Rainbow will sit at a table with coffee and chat with the clientele of the cafe. After 20 minutes of conversation, Rainbow will write a poem for the person.
The man is impossible to pinpoint. The reason, many believe, is that he is living a different reality.. in a Rainbow world. But the men for whom he has worked are impressed by his talent and his savvy. Jungbauer, who probably knows him as well as anyone can, is astounded by the artist. "He is just unbelievable," he says. "He could be a millionaire, but he won't. He is paint unless I feel it." Anything he does, he does from the heart. "He can make something out of nothing." It's been said that an artist's work will reveal more about his personality than his words ever could. Such is the case with Rainbow. Consider the following:
I once saw a feather without a bird.
It was the quietest thing I've never heard.
Billy John Rainbow
Date Unknown.
4 Pictures

The Lawrence Township Journal
Wednesday, September 2, 1981
Juergen Jungbauer shows his daughter Tanya Jungbauer the 65X12 foot European-style mural Billy John Rainbow is finishing. The colorful scenic painting has taken 1 1/2 years to complete.
(LTJ photo)

The Lawrence Township Journal
July 23, 1980
PENDLETON "STRASSE" will never be the same after the famous Edelweiss Duo gave an outside "concert" last week. Yodeling in front of the Heidelberg Cafe are Karl Kugler, (left to right) zither; Ellen Bernschneider, Sally Withem, and Fritz Martin, drums. (LTJ Photo)

 

The News Free Time, Indiana
Food and Fun Doubled
June 14-21, 1980
By Marge Hanley, Food Editor

There is food at the Midsummer Festival because it's fun for those who cook and cater. And the food this year will be more fun for those who dine at the 6 to midnight event next Saturday on Monument Circle. There will be more of it more tastes to try and more and shorter lines in which to buy it.
Other restaurant owners and managers echo the benefit of exposure and good advertising for their businesses and the possibility of gaining new customers at their permanent locations. "I'm excited just to get out of the store," admits Juergen Jungbauer of the Heidelberg Cafe. He says he delights in the chance to meet new people and see their appreciation of his pastries.
Jungbauer charges $1 at the festival for pastries he sells for 70 cents in his cafe. The extra charge covers not only the contribution to Cathedral Arts but also the costs of extra help he has to hire and equipment ($3,000) and decorations he has purchased for the festival. He has bought two refrigeration units and commissioned a 45-foot mural for his festival booth.

Indianapolis Home
March 1980
By Deborah Paul

Wilkommen to a slice of the Old World! Leave the city hubbub behind and, amidst a background of lilting German folk music, relax and coffeeklatsch in an authentic European cafe. The scrumptious six-layer tortes and delectable Black Forest Cake are only the beginning of this tribute to owner Juergen Jungbauer's homeland. The German confectioner-turned-pastry-chef extraordinary has served Presidents Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon in the White House and will be just as gracious to you! A mini-museum is filled with turn-of-the-century gadgets. Embroidered dirndl dresses and authentic lederhose, imported beer steins, cuckoo clocks, and Hummel figurines are for sale. Browse for an hour, sample some bratwurst and potato salad, and buy a German souvenir before saying auf wiedersehn!

Indianapolis Monthly
Best & Worst in Indianapolis
Best Bakery: Cafe Heidelberg. Try the colorful layered things.
January 1980

 

The Lawrence Township Journal
Wednesday, October 17, 1979
Four generations - Mayor Morris Settles greets members of a Lawrence family and their "grandma" from Germany. Representing four generations are (left to right) Berta Ujvari, visiting from Germany, Ella Bernschneider, the mayor, Gabi Jungbauer, and Ellen Bernschneider, with Corina and Heidi Jungbauer in the front. (A Lawrence Journal photo).

Indiana Bakers Association
September 15, 1979
With "E.E." and "J.J. both doing their bit, we had a good night.
Old Heidelberg's "Juergen Jungbauer" presented his bakery wares and, they were excellent. We served them for dessert. They quickly disappeared - the final test of quality. "J.J.'s" jug runneth over because he combines his enthusiasm for his work with quality work. The club appreciates very much the presence of "John" and "J.J." for a fine evening.

The Lawrence Township Journal
'First day of school' special to German child
August 29, 1979
By Helga Grigsby

AN OLD German custom made my first day of school quite an enjoyable experience. On the night before the big day my mother hastened me to bed so that I could get up earlier than usual. I was too excited and was not able to sleep at all. I kept thinking of the next day and all the new children whom I was going to meet.
AT LAST the day I had been anxiously awaiting arrived. I hurriedly got dressed, ate my breakfast, and then left for school. Since it is the custom, my parents took me. When we arrived at the school, I met my teacher and many children. As the parents were leaving, some of the children cried; I did not, however, because I was looking forward to what I knew was coming.
Even THOUGH school lasted two hours, it seemed like an eternity to me. I suppose knowing what was ahead made it seem loner, but worthwhile. When school was out, my parents were waiting and I ran to meet them. I could see my mother was carrying the wonderful thing I had been waiting for. It was a "Zuckertuete," which is a huge decorated paper cone filled with candy. I could see all the other children's parents parents had brought them one too, and they were just as delighted as I was. This old tradition is one that all German children enjoy.
In MY case, as in many others, this custom served to soften my first day of school. That day has become one of the most memorable experiences of my school years.
Picture NICE BEGINNING - Continuing the German Tradition, Kory Riesterer and Heidi Jungbauer, daughter of the owner of the Heidelberg Bakery, receive imported German candy cones after their very first day at Skiles Test Elementary School.

Traditional German Zuckertueten, or candy cones, can be purchased at Heidelberg Haus & Cafe, Pendleton Pike, Indianapolis, IN.

The Lawrence Township Journal
July 18, 1979
Brushstrokes - Last Wednesday artist Billyjohn Rainbow put the finishing touches on a mural he painted on the facade of the Heidelberg Cafe, 7625 Pendleton Pike. He depicted both real and imaginary scenes of Europe in his work.

 

 

Midwest Bakers Association
July 14, 1979 ???
News and Briefs of our Members...
Success... Many feel that the day has passed that a person can start small, build, and grow. Juergen L. Jungbauer, who had been baking for the officers at Fort Harrison, butcher shop in the other half. In time he bought out the butcher shop and made this a luncheon service added. It is called "Cafe Heidelberg", and his cards read, "House of Fine German Foods and Pastries". German style hard rolls-bread, Cakes and Torten, Imported Gifts. I forgot to mention that Juergen learned his trade in Germany, and learned it well. His bakery products are delicious.
Continuing on, he bought the building and very recently he added another building approximately 30' x 75'. This part he turned into a bakery museum which contains the front of an old peel oven with many pieces of equipment and books dating back to the 1600's. Besides the old time items of a retail bakery he has many imported items for sale including gourmet foods. He has pictures of some of our presidents, state, and federal officials for whom he made special cakes. His place nd his success is beyond description. May I suggest you go and see for yourself a place that is beyond words.
Juergen is still in need of material for his museum. The letter below from him is self-explanatory. If you have anything of interest, write Juergen L. Jungbauer, Cafe Heidelberg, 7625 Pendleton Pike, Indianapolis, Indiana 46226.
"Dear Mr. Doll, I am still in need of old pictures of the inside of old bakeries, pictures of horse drawn bread delivery wagons, old bread advertising posters, flour and sugar sacks, baker's calendars, old recipes (perhaps handwritten) for my old bakery museum in Indianapolis.
I am sure some of our older bakers or families have a lot of bakery related items in some drawers or boxes laying around and will in time just get thrown out. I will display them proudly in my antique museum as part of the American and European bakery heritage and every bakery will be recognized.
Also, if any of your bakers know of any very old bakeries going out of business please let me know to protect the tools and equipment for future generations and school kids to look at (an almost lost art).
I enclose a picture with part of the 1906 bake shop in my museum. A German baker sold me some over 300 years old wooden Springerle and Lebkuchan molds. Also handwritten recipe books from the early 1800. Some of the books go back to 1696. I hope to see you in time again Mr. Doll and like to remain, Yours sincerely, Juergen L. Jungbauer, Your little German Baker Boy."

Indianapolis News
June 18, 1979
Mrs. John T. Neighbors and Mrs. David R. Frick prepare to sample German pastries prepared by Juergen Jungbauer. An assortment of sweets will be available at the Cafe Heidelberg booth on the Circle Saturday evening during the Midsummer Festival. -
, The NEWS Photo, Bill Worcester

 

Celebrity Recipes Book
Gourmet Grub From Indy's Great & Near Great
Spring 1979

Juergen Jungbauer
Juergen Jungbauer is from Karlsruhe, Germany. He is the proprietor of the Heidelberg Cafe and a master baker, having begun his apprenticeship in the confectionery business in 1957 at the age of 12. The Cafe not only features delicious baked items and pastries, but is filled with artifacts imported from his homeland. He is proud to say that he supplied cakes for the U.S. Culinary Olympic Team to be taken to the international competition in Frankfurt, Germany, in the fall of 1968. "This recipe is my own creation and one which I especially enjoy serving at home on special locations."
Bavarian Chocolate Souffle with Black Forest Sabayon Sauce
2 tbsp. butter
2 tbsp. flour
1/2 cup milk
2 inch piece vanilla bean or 1/2 tsp. vanilla
11/2 squares unsweetened chocolate
5 tbsp. granulated sugar
5 eggs, separated

Sabayon Sauce:
2 eggs
2 egg yolks
4 tbsp. sugar
4 tbsp. dry white wine
1 tbsp. kirsch (optional)

Melt butter in sauce pan, add flour and stir until smooth. Scald vanilla bean with hot milk; remove bean, then combine with butter mixture and stir until boiling point is reached. Add the egg yolks slowly, then add melted chocolate. Beat egg whites with sugar and fold into chocolate batter. Grease a six-cup souffle dish with butter and sprinkle with sugar; pour in souffle. Place dish in a pan of water and bake for 20 minutes at 200-450 degrees. While souffle is cooking, prepare sauce. Combine eggs and egg yolks with sugar and wine in top of a double boiler, beating with rotary beater or hand whip until thick. Add kirsch. Serve red hot or chilled with piping hot souffle. Makes 6 one-cup servings.

Indiana Bakers Association
Cafe Heidelberg Bakery & Gift Shop
July 1978

At the age of 14 the option was to choose a vacation or trade. Three days of work, three days of school, work in several cities in German, pastry work abroad the Hamburg-American Ship Lines, pastry work in several Eastern U.S. cities, pastry work at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, ... al this and more prepared Jurgen Jungbauer for his happy life as owner, builder, financier, pastry chef, antique collector, Gourmet foods merchandiser, speaker, and general handyman at Cafe Heidelberg Bakery & Gift Shop (Indianapolis).
J.J. is first of all a pastry chef and a very enthusiastic one. To appreciate his mastery at the craft you have but to visit the Cafe and enjoy his "mastry". His advice if solicited.."Do it differently"... "Get a good basic recipe and use it often ... Follow the recipe, exactly ... Don't slurp - measure ... Read the bakery periodicals and study the formulas and recipes. Other bakers have food ideas and are talented ..."Be creative" ... "Specialize" ... "Make your salesroom a pleasant experience, make it comfortable and attractive".
Jurgen was born in Karlsruhe Germany (near the Black Forest area). His museum is a reminder of his strong German tradition. He communicates with German friends who assist him in gathering items for his museum and specialties for his gourmet food selection. He uses his twenty-one years in the industry well, both in baking knowledge and merchandising knowhow.
We visited Cafe Heidelberg because it is Bakery-Cafe-Museum. We are intrigued with the Bakery-Deli ... Bakery-Supermarket ... Supermarket-Bakery ... Bakery-Coffee Shop ... Bakery-Ice Cream ... Bakery-Candy Shop ... Bakery-Gourmet Foods ... Bakery-Heaven knows. Jurgen Jungbauer believes in his Bakery-Cafe-Museum and enjoys it. He is now planning a Garden effect to the rear of his present facilities.
J.J. is interested in any Bakery antique items available. Particularly picture of Old Bakeries, Old cloth flour bags. Contact him, you'll enjoy knowing him better. We did and found him to be very interesting and (that which separates him from many) most interested. ojs

Indiana Bakers Association
June, 1978
A lady I know was very complimentary of the Cafe Heidelberg bakery and asked why we don't have more like it in Indianapolis?
Reminder ----Bakery Museum
One of our good members, Juergen L. Jungbauer, has added a bakery museum to his bakery and is interested in receiving photographs of old bakeries, horse drawn delivery wagons, old posters and any other antique pieces of bakery equipment. His bakery museum now has an old-fashioned peel oven, molds and other pieces of equipment and formula books dating back to the 1600's. If you have anything of interest please contact him at Cafe Heidelberg, 7625 Pendleton Pike, Indianapolis, Indiana, 46226.

The Travel Journal
Spring 1978
Cafe Heidelberg features bakery museum
Juergen Jungbauer, the owner of the Cafe Heidelberg at 7625 Pendleton Pike, displays the bakery museum, a recent addition to the "little German Store." The Cafe Heidelberg is also a pastry shop, a European style coffee house and a German gift store.

 

The Indianapolis Star
Travelers' Restaurant Guide Salutes City
November 26 - December 3, 1977

By Jane Allison
Condensed story
The first restaurant of any pretension in Indianapolis was established by John Crowder in 1938. In 1840 an Englishman, John Hodgkins, bought the restaurant, added a confectionary, and created the city's first ice cream garden, where couples could stroll along graveled paths that wound among the arbors and flower gardens, and sample the new frozen delicacy in the garden's gazebos. (Today, candy-colored Snow Bird Frozen Custard Shops offer "top-quality, made-here soft ice cream and frozen yogurt.") So begins the 18-page section on Indianapolis (and environs) eating houses in the new Random House ($5.95) book,"Where To Eat In America," edited by William Rice and Burton Wolf. They call it "an indispensable guide to finding what you want to eat, when you want to eat it, in the 30 most traveled American cities." And certainly there has never been a food guide like it before. For one thing, the editors did not make themselves the final judges. Rather, they had 30 taste testers who went from city to city, and who, in turn worked (as in the case of Indiana) with a number of Hoosier, or local, food critics. The Cafe Heidelberg, Cafe and Gift Shop at Pendleton Pike, was voted for having the best hot dogs in Indianapolis. *

Indianapolis News
Where To Eat That's A Treat
November 17, 1977

By David Mannweiler
Condensed story
About a year ago, the food editor of the Indianapolis News, took a look at the growing number of restaurants in Indianapolis. William Rice, the Washington newsman, said he had an idea for a new restaurant guide aimed at businessmen and women who do a lot of traveling but never seem to know where the best restaurants are. He wanted Mrs. Hanley to write the chapter on Indianapolis. "I felt competent that I was able o express the business woman's tastes but not the business man's," Mrs. Hanley said. Her solution was to make a questionnaire and send it to 75 local businessmen "who travel a lot, who eat out regularly, and who are associated with good food." Seventy questionnaires were returned, a phenomenal number for any survey. Forty restaurants are mentioned in the Indianapolis chapter. The best hotdog in Indianapolis, the businessmen and Mrs. Hanley agreed, is served at the HEIDELBERG CAFE, while the best steak is in St. Elmo's. Mrs. Hanley is pleased to report, that you, that despite the research she put into the project, she didn't gain a pound.*

Where to eat in America
June 1977
By William Rice and Burton Wolf
An indispensable guide to finding WHAT you want to eat WHEN you want to eat it in the 30most-traveled American Cities
Indianapolis
Best Hot Dog in Indianapolis
Real German wienerwuerstchen and bratwurst made in Indianapolis, served on homemade dark rye bread. The cafe serves a limited menu of German lunches, but the specialty is French and Austrian pastry (see MARKETS). Family owned and operated in the old-world tradition. Quaint and cluttered cafe that offers epicurean imports, German artifacts and an antique bakery museum. German sausages from $1.55.
MARKETS
Authentic French and Austrian pastries and tortes. German gift shop, imported epicurean foods, a few European-style breads . Browse the bakery museum and sample the sweets, or snack on German lunches in the cafe. Open daily.

Konditorei und Cafe, German Pastry Chef Magazine
Eine Anzeige brachte sie zusammen
Freundschat ueber den "grosssen Teich"
18. Dezember 1976

Indianpolis. Wenn am Heiligabend "Gruesse in alle Welt" verschickt werden, dann hat Elisabeth Behme ihren Weihnachtsbrief aus Indianapolis schon laengst in der Hand. Seit zwoelf Jahren lebt sie in Goettingen - seit Februar vergangenen Jahres allein. Den Tod ihres Mannes Hugo - ein bekannter Baecker- und Konditormeister, der seinen geliebten Beruf wegen eines Augenleidens aufgeben musste - hat sie immer noch nicht ueberwunden. Was ihr Trost und Halt gibt, ist eine noch von ihrem Lebensgefaehrten angeknuepfte Freundschaft mit einer jungen, liebenswerten Familie jenseits des Atlantiks, die mit einer einfachen Annonce in der Fachzeitschrift begann. Juergen Jungbauer, 33 Jahre alt und vor dreizehn Jahren in die Staaten ausgewandert, wollte den Amerikanern gern zeigen, wie das gute deutsche alte Konditorenhandwerk frueher gearbeitet hatte. Seiner Heimat eng verbunden, richtete der junge Meister in seinem Cafe in Indianapolis ein kleines Museum ein und kam auf diese Weise in Kontakt mit Hugo Behme in Goettingen. Denn: Hugo Behme hatte nicht nur gut dreihundert Jahre alte Holzformen in seinem Privatbesitz, er hatte noch etwas viel Wertvolleres: Eigenhaendig geschriebene und selbst gebundene Rezepturen, die Hugo Behme waehrend der Kriegsgefangenschaft aus dem Gedaechtnis aufgezeichnet hatte. Der alte und der junge Baeckermeister kamen ins Geschaeft, mehr noch: Aus einer Korrespondenz per Tonband entwickelte sich eine enge Freundschaft zwischen den Familien.
Und was ihr Mann nicht mehr selbst tun konnte, uebernahm dann Elisabeth Behme. Im September 1975 reiste sie mit grossen Gepaeck in die Staaten und ueberbrachte die wertvollen Gegenstaende hoechstpersoenlich. Juergen Jungbauer, seine junge Frau Gabi und die beiden Toechter - Heidi, drei, Corinna zwei Jahre alt - nahmen die Goettingerin mit offenen Armen auf. Elisabeth Behme, die selbst keine Kinder hat, war ueberwaeltigt: "Diese jungen Leute haben fuer jeden ein frohes Wort, strahlen soviel Troestliches aus, dass man nichts anderes kann, als sie liebzuhaben."
Und eigentlich, so meinte sie, sollte auch gar nicht von ihrem Mann und ihr selbst die Rede sein, denn sie sind es, die einem neue Freude am Leben schenken". Doch der junge schwaebische Baeckermeister ist da anderer Ansicht. In einem Brief an das TAGEBLATT, in dem er einen Zeitungsausschnitt aus der Indianapolis-Zeitung ueber die Uebergabe der kostbaren Backformen und Hefte beifuegt, meint er: "Ich glaube, dass auch Ihre Leser sehr interessiert waeren, etwas ueber diesen einmaligen Konditormeister zu hoeren, der wohl zu den wenigen 'grossen' ihrer Zeit gehoerte." 3 Pictures (same story as Goettingen 1975)

The Indy Guidebook to Greater Living for Less
By Jo Desmeules
November 11, 1976

Cafe Heidelberg is one change-of-pace treat you owe yourself! It's a cafe in the European sense - small tables, cozy atmosphere, and walls covered with newspaper clippings testifying to the proprietor's culinary expertise. Mr. Juergen Jungbauer (the famous shopowner) set up this bakery-cafe-museum under one roof, so you can buy, set a spell, or browse around. Mr. Jungbauer makes over 300 different German pastries - everyday he has a different specialty. I spied heaps of luscious cookies in all shapes and sizes. (A batch of his bourbon balls and sticks may be just the thing for Christmas parties.) He'll bake you a wedding cake covered with buttercream, instead of icing, or whip up a torten at a moment's notice. The food stock extends beyond the bakery level to other import items - spaetzle, zeitschriften, and romane, for instance. You can also pick up a unique gift, such as lederhosen, a beer stein, or a cuckoo clock. If time is no problem, look through the food museum at the Renaissance molds or the turn-of-the-century donut machine and brick oven.

Indianapolis Star
Glimpses
Sunday, October 17, 1976

What is junk to some people is nostalgia to Juergen Jungbauer and he converts it to atmosphere for his bakery museum on Indianapolis' Northeastside.
A native of Germany's Black Forest region (he was born at Karlsruhe), Jungbauer created the museum as a memorial to the small family bakery. "It's a dying art," he says. "There is no new blood coming into the business."
Highlight of the museum is a restored 1906 bakery, typical of ones then seen in Indiana, Ohio and Germany. Jungbauer delights in showing visitors how long oarlike paddles were used to remove steaming loaves of bread from the oven. Ancient flour sifters, cooky molds, a mincemeat chipper (he says there's one like it in the Smithsonian Institution), and balance-beam scales lend authenticity. Most of the items were badly rusted when he got them and had to be restored by sandblasting.
On a shelf is a row of chocolate molds, seldom seen in America. Jungbauer's brother rescued them from a German junkyard - he paid $10 for the lot. Many of the relics have been given to the German baker by friends and customers and his mother frequently sends him thing from Germany.
Jungbauer opened Cafe Heidelberg in 1968 when he got out of the U.S. Army. He had been pastry chef for two years at the Fort Benjamin Harrison officers' club. The cafe quickly attracted German-Americans from throughout central Indiana, who enjoyed talking about the old country. And the more they talked, the more reminiscent Jungbauer became. The museum was the end result.
A feature of the museum is a collection of recipe books, one of them a thick, beautifully preserved edition printed in 1967. But Jungbauer's favorite is a handwritten collection of baking recipes.
"It was written by a German tank commander during World War II, after he was captured and in Allied prison camps," he says. There are about 500 pages, carefully trimmed from brown paper bags. Jungbauer says the German officer wrote much of the book by candle light.
Jungbauer had placed an ad in a German newspaper about his search for bakery mementoes for a museum. And when he got a letter from the recipe book writer, he flew to Germany to meet him.
"He game me the book," Jungbauer says. "He would accept no money - he just wanted it to be in some hands where it would be appreciated.
1 Picture full page

The Lawrence TWP Journal
Cafe Heidelberg features new bakery museum
Thursday, October 14, 1976
By Fred Bagg

Thirteen years ago a young immigrant pastry chef came to this country with $30 in his pocket. Today, a successful entrepreneur, this same man has people come from hundreds of miles away to visit his place of business.
Juergen Jungbauer, JJ, is the owner of the Cafe Heidelberg at 7625 Pendleton Pike. The Cafe Heidelberg is a pastry shop, a European style, coffee house, a German gift store and a museum.
That's right - a museum! One corner of JJ's recently renovated "little German Store" is dedicated to the reconstruction of an old-world bakery. JJ is building the bakery with antiques from Germany and from all over the United States. He says, "You can't find things like this anymore - we should have something to show what it was like in a bakery 50 or 80 years ago."
The Lawrence businessman who came to America in 1963 has recently added a German giftware store and the bakery museum to this Cafe on the Pike. The Cafe Heidelberg is quite a place. Along the paneled walls are displayed a variety of items: trophies and ribbons he has won as a pastry chef, antiques of the "old world", collections of all sorts, numerous framed newspaper stories and magazine articles about him and a photo gallery of notable personages JJ has served. These include Presidents Johnson and Nixon, numerous senators and congressmen, several Indiana governors, and a number of other VIP's.
It wasn't always this way. Jungbauer was born in Karlsruhe, Germany, in the Black Forest area. When he was 14, he enrolled in a trade school to learn the job of pastry chef. He quickly developed the talents which have carried him to the position of a successful businessman that he now is.
After short jobs as a pastry chef in German cafes, Jungbauer became a confectioner aboard the Caribbean cruiser, S.S. Hanseatic of the Hamburg American Lines.
In 1963 a New Yorker, Carl Hoppl, sponsored Jungbauer's entry into the United States and he started work as pastry chef at Hoppl's Long Island restaurant. Later JJ became pastry chef at the El Dorado Hotel in Sacramento, California, and the El Dorado Lodge in Tucson, Arizona.
In 1967 he was drafted into the Army (aliens are subject to the draft after they have been in the country six months) and after basic training he was assigned to the Finance Center at Fort Benjamin Harrison.
Jungbauer went to the military authorities here and told them he was an experienced pastry chef and - believe it or not - was promptly assigned to the Officers' Club as a pastry chef.
When he was discharged from the Army in late 1968, he decided to stay in Indianapolis. He bought a small bakery on Pendleton Pike and in the eight years he has been a resident of Lawrence he has turned the Cafe Heidelberg into a showplace of central Indiana.
JJ has never baked a loaf of bread in his life.
"You've got to understand" he says in a heavily accented voice, "that in the old country a pastry chef and a baker are not the same. They have been trained differently. I specialize in pastries, they are different."
The 33-year old owner of the Cafe Heidelberg says that his establishment has become a center for the German community in Indianapolis. "It is a little German Store" he says. Now, with the addition of his gift shop he sells almost anything German - from German magazines to Hummel figurines and Lederhosen and Dirndls. About 30% of JJ's business is from Germans and German Americans. "I offer an opportunity to get over the homesickness" he says, "by offering a bit of Germany thousands of miles from the fatherland."
Although his new addition allows him to sell a number of German gift items and provides more room for the "coffee house" atmosphere he likes to share, people still come to the Cafe Heidelberg for the pastries. There are hundreds of them - cakes and tortes of all kinds, cookies and confections - they are all there. They are sinfully rich and indescribably delicious.
Obviously, JJ uses only the best ingredients; his special suppliers are located all over the country. Because he uses no chemical additives, his baked goods won't keep as long as those from the American type bakeries. He recommends that his pastries be kept refrigerated. He is meticulous about sanitation, and his "little German Store" is neat and clean.
More than 50 first place trophies or ribbons from baking contests are in full view. He does confess however, that he once won a second place ribbon. It was the time he entered two cakes in the same judging category - he won first and second place!
The Cafe Heidelberg has grown - now housing the German gift store and JJ's pet project, the Bakery museum - but the friendliness that characterized the cafe when Juergen Jungbauer opened it eight years ago still is it's biggest trademark and asset.

The Lawrence Township Journal
July 29, 1976
Bicentinnial Birthday - Corina Jungbauer sits on top of a special birthday cake that is a tribute to the nation's 200th birthday as well as her own birthday which is coming up. Her father, who owns a German Bakery on Pendleton Pike, made the cake for his daughter's 4th birthday.

Baker Boy News, Indiana
July, 1976
SUCCESS... Many feel that the day has passed that a person can start small, build, and grow. Juergen L. Jungbauer, who had been baking for the officers at Fort Harrison, apparently had not heard of this. He bought a small bakery in a building that had a butcher shop in the other half. In time he bought out the butcher shop and made this his shop. What had been his shop and salesroom was made into a larger salesroom with a luncheon service added. It is called "Cafe Heidelberg", and his cards read, "House of Fine German Foods and Pastries". German style hard rolls-bread, Cakes and Torten, Imported Gifts. I forgot to mention that Juergen learned his trade in Germany, and learned it well. His bakery products are delicious.
Continuing on, he bought the building and very recently he added another building approximately 30'X75'. This part he turned into a bakery museum which contains the front of an old peel oven with many pieces of equipment and books dating back to the 1600's. Besides the old time items of a retail bakery he has many imported items for sale including gourmet foods. He has pictures of some of our presidents, state and federal officials for whom he made special cakes. His place and his success is beyond description. May I suggest you go and see for yourself a place that is beyond words.
Juergen is still in need of material for his museum. The letter below from him is self-explanatory. If you have anything of interest, write Juergen L. Jungbauer, Cafe Heidelberg, 7625 Pendleton Pike, Indianapolis, IN 46226.
"Dear Mr. Doll, I am still in need of old pictures of the inside of old bakeries, pictures of horse drawn bread delivery wagons, old bread advertising posters, flour and sugar sacks, baker's calendars, old recipes (perhaps handwritten) for my old bakery museum in Indianapolis. I am sure some of our older bakers or families have a lot of bakery related items in some drawers or boxes laying around and will in time just get thrown out. I will display them proudly in my antique museum as part of the American and European bakery heritage and every bakery will be recognized. Also, if any of your bakers know of any very old bakeries going out of business please let me know to protect the tools and equipment for future generations and school kids to look at (a almost lost art). I enclose a picture with part of the 1906 bake shop in my museum. A German baker sold me some over 300 years old wooden Springerle and Lebkuchen molds. Also handwritten recipe books from he early 1800. Some of the books go back to 1696.
I hope to see you in time again Mr. Doll and like to remain, Yours sincerely, Juergen L. Jungbauer, Your little German Baker Boy.

The Lawrence Topics
Wednesday, February 18, 1976
Surprise Party Honors Mayor
By:
More than 210 persons honored Mayor Morris Settles las Wednesday night at a surprise birthday party - "probably the best kept secret" in Lawrence. Fifty businessmen and women invited 150 city officials and employees to the buffet dinner and party at the Fraternal Order of Police Hall. The Heidelberg Bakery provided a huge decorated cake, inscribed with wishes for Mayor Settles to have a happy 60th birthday.
Picture 1 - An amazed Mayor Morris Settles (second from right) is greeted by Mrs. Rose Farmer, who arranged the birthday and appreciation celebration for the Mayor, as James Hardin, City Councilman and Mrs. Settles share the moment of surprise.
Picture 2 - A huge birthday cake complete with a fisherman and the words "Happy 60th Birthday to Our Beloved Mayor" was part of the surprise birthday party given Mayor Morris Settles by 50 merchants and businessmen in Lawrence last week.


Midwest Bakers Association
January 1976
Reminder --- Bakery Museum
One of our good members, Juergen L. Jungbauer, has added a bakery museum to his bakery and is interested in receiving photographs of old bakeries, horse-drawn delivery wagons, old posters and any other antique pieces of bakery equipment. His bakery museum now has an old-fashioned peel oven, molds and other pieces of equipment and formula books dating back to the 1600;s. If yo have anything of interest please contact him at -- Cafe Heidelberg, 7625 Pendleton Pike, Indianapolis, Indiana 46226.

Tageblatt Goettingen, Germany
Weihnachten 1975
Von Ulla Borchard

Eine Anzeige brachte sie zusammen: Freundschaft ueber den "grossen Teich"
Ein junger und ein alter Baeckermeister "uebersprangen" die Grenzen
Wenn das TAGEBLATT am heutigen Heiligabend "Gruesse in alle Welt" verschickt, dann hat Elisabeth Behme ihren Weihnachtsbrief aus Indianapolis schon laengst in der Hand. Seit elf Jahren lebt sie in Goettingen - seit Februar dieses Jahres allein. Den Tod ihres Mannes Hugo - ein bekannter Baeckermeister, der seinen geliebten Beruf wegen eines Augenleidens aufgeben musste -, hat sie immer noch nicht ueberwunden. Was ihr Trost und Halt gibt, ist eine noch von ihrem Lebensgefaehrten angeknuepfte Freundschaft mit einer jungen, liebenswerten Familie jenseits des Atlantiks, die mit einer einfachen Annonce in einer Baecker-Fachzeitschrift begann.
Juergen Jungbauer, 32 Jahre alt und vor zwoelf Jahren in die Staaten ausgewandert, wollte den Amerikanern gern zeigen, wie das gute deutsche alte Baeckerhandwerk frueher gearbeitet hatte. Seiner Heimat eng verbunden, richtete der junge Baeckereimeister in seinem Cafe in Indianapolis ein kleines Museum ein und kam auf die Weise in Kontakt mit Hugo Behme in Goettingen. Denn: Hugo Behme hatte nicht nur gut dreihundert Jahre alte Holzformen in seinem Privatbesitz, er hatte noch etwas viel Wertvolleres: Eigenhaendig geschriebene und selbst gebundene Rezepturen, die Hugo Behme waehrend der Kriegsgefangenschaft aus dem Gedaechtnis aufgezeichnet hatte. Der alte und der junge Baeckermeister kamen ins Geschaeft, mehr noch: Aus einer Korrespondenz per Tonband entwickelte sich eine enge Freundschaft zwischen den Familien.
Und was ihr Mann nicht mehr selbst tun konnte, uebernahm dann Elisabeth Behme. Im September 1975 reiste sie mit grossen Gepaeck in die Staaten und ueberbrachte die wertvollen Gegenstaende hoechstpersoenlich. Juergen Jungbauer, seine junge Frau Gabi und die beiden Toechter - Heidi, drei, Corinna zwei jahre alt - nahmen die Goettingerin mit offenen Armen auf. Elisabeth Behme, die selbst keine Kinder hat, war ueberwaeltigt: "Diese jungen Leute haben fuer jeden ein frohes Wort, strahlen soviel Troestliches aus, dass man nichts anderes kann, als sie liebzuhaben."
Und eigentlich, so meinte sie, sollte auch gar nicht von ihrem Mann und ihr selbst die Rede sein, denn sie sind es, die einem neue Freude am Leben schenken". Doch der junge schwaebische Baeckermeister ist da anderer Ansicht. In einem Brief an das TAGEBLATT, in dem er einen Zeitungsausschnitt aus der Indianapolis-Zeitung ueber die Uebergabe der kostbaren Backformen und Hefte beifuegt, meint er: "Ich glaube, dass auch Ihre Leser sehr interessiert waeren, etwas ueber diesen einmaligen Konditormeister zu hoeren, der wohl zu den wenigen 'grossen' ihrer Zeit gehoerte."
Picture

The Indianapolis News
Chef Tries to Preserve Art
Wednesday, October 8, 1975

With a legacy recorded in a prisoner of war camp and 300-year-old relics of an extinct craft, Juergen Jungbauer plans to keep alive an almost lost art.
Jungbauer is a pastry chef - an artist whose medium is confections, his palette a mixing bowl and his brush is a pastry tube. A specialist in European confectionery, he is building a bakery museum to display the tools of his art. The prized possessions of his bicentennial project are gifts from a German pastry master, Hugo Behme. Intricately carved 300-year-old wooden molds, used for cake and cookie decoration as well as wax relieves, have been brought from Gottingen, Germany, by Behme's widow, Elisabeth.
Destined to be the one to preserve the master confectioner's heritage, Jungbauer has also received Behme's handwritten recipe books. Often asked to give demonstrations on his craft to adult and student groups, he decided several years ago to collect bakery antiques and eventually house this rare collections in a bakery museum, an addition to his Cafe Heidelberg coffee and pastry shop. "Young people don't have a chance to see a real bakery," he explained. "I wanted to preserve the historic moments in the tradition of baking-how chefs used to work, creating fantastic cakes and pastries with very primitive tools." "I advertised in German trade magazines for pictures pertaining to confectionery," he continued. "Behme wrote to me that he had a lot of nice items." The correspondence and exchange of tape recordings continued, and Jungbauer, a German by birth, discovered that his correspondent was one of the most honored pastry chefs in his native land. Finally Jungbauer, his wife Gabi and daughter Heidi visited the Behmes. (Daughter Corina was too young to travel that distance.) The visit confirmed for the master that he had found his successor.
Elisabeth Behme arrived recently in Indianapolis to deliver her now deceased husband's legacy. "She wouldn't trust the mails to deliver the molds and books," said Jungbauer. "She carried them herself all the way. She is so unselfish. They're a gift to me." "The ideal is more than the material consideration. They're in good hands with him," reaffirmed Jungbauer's benefactor.
Jungbauer gently flipped the pages of Behme's recorded recipes and pointed to the covers - cardboard packaging carefully gleaned from CARE packages delivered to Behme while a prisoner of war. The wax coating had been scraped away to be formed into candles to provide the precious light for nighttime writing. Lamenting that European pastry quality is declining, Jungbauer described the origin of his craft. Over 300 years ago, confectioners made sugar coating for the bitter pills produced by the pharmacists. Not having enough work, they began creating marzipan confections, honey cakes and other almond paste treats.
Jungbauer began his guild training in Germany at 14. He graduated to journeyman, then continued his career on an ocean liner, through several plush resort hotels and gained local and national acclaim when, as a draftee, he was assigned to the Officers' Club at Fort Harrison.
His Cafe Heidelberg is his own creation. "We do strictly European pastries and breads," he explained, citing the 100 different types of cakes and 600 to 700 different pastries in his repertoire. Uncompromising quality of his code, and the fresh eggs, real butter cream and 36-percent butterfat whipping cream ordered from California attest to his high standards.
Picture text
Elisabeth Behme (left) presents antique molds to Juergen and Gabi (right) Jungbauer. - The NEWS Photo, Bob Doeppers.

The Indianapolis Star
Concerning Women
Thursday, April 24, 1975

Bake Cake - "Kitchen Kapers" a unique demonstration-bazaar for cooking and kitchen ideas and equipment, drew a big crowd yesterday in the Murat Shrine Club. Proceeds benefit projects of the Salvation Army Women's Auxiliary of Indianapolis. Chef Juergen Jungbauer demonstrates cake-baking.

 

The Indianapolis Star
Wednesday, April 16, 1975
Ten Chefs To Display Expertise
By: Marge Hanley, Food Editor

There will be no doubt which room is the most important in the home when the Salvation Army Auxiliary unveils its "Kitchen Kapers" on April 23. In true mountain-to-Mohammed fashion, Indianapolis stores will move part of their lock, stock and product for the kitchen into the Murat Shrine club for the 10 a.m. to 2p.m. shopping spree. A handcraft boutique filled with culinary creations made by auxiliary members will also tempt shoppers. The highlight of the midday kitchen fest will be the performances of 10 city chefs and cuisine specialists.
Each chef will continuously demonstrate and prepare food for sampling at his individual island area," explained Mrs. Alan Levinshohn, who along with Mrs. John West is project chairman.
The artistry of hors d'oeuvre and desserts will share center.
"it sure is a lot of work to make a good cake," admitted Juergen L. Jungbauer of Cafe Heidelberg, who will make European cakes and pastries the day of the "Kapers." The number of eggs will vary, he said, depending upon how much of the liquid evaporates while cooking
CREAM PUFFS

1/2 cup water
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup flour
5 to 6 medium eggs

Combine water, milk, butter and salt in a saucepan. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and add flour all at once, beating thoroughly and rapidly. Beat until mixture forms a ball and leaves the sides of the pan. Remove from heat and add eggs, one at a time, beating mixture thoroughly for about one minute after each addition. Continue beating until dough is shiny and satiny and leaves the spoon when raised. Drop 12 rounded tablespoonful, about 2 inches apart, on ungreesed cooky sheet. Bake in a preheated 450-degree oven 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 350 degrees and bake 30 minutes longer or until browned. Puff should sound hollow when lightly tapped with fingertip. Cool on wire rack, avoiding drafts. Cut off tops and fill with ice cream, custard or whipped cream. Replace tops and dust with powdered sugar, frost with chocolate and favorite glaze. Make 12 miniature puffs for canapes can be made by using teaspoonful and baking at 400 for 15 minutes and 350 for 10 minutes. Makes 50 tiny puffs.
1 Picture
Mrs. Addison King II (left) and Mrs. John Glligan select chef's wares for "Kitchen Kapers." - The NEWS Photo, William Palmer.

COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY
Wendell H. Ford, Governor
December 2, 1974
To All To Whom These Presents Shall Come Greeting:
Know Ye, That
HONORABLE JUERGEN L. JUNGBAUER, INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA
Is Commissioned A
KENTUCKY COLONEL
I hereby confer this honor with all the rights, privileges and responsibilities thereunto appertaining.
In testimony whereof, I have caused these letters bo be made patent and the seal of the Commonwealth to be hereunto affixed. Done at Frankfort, the 2nd day of December in the year of our Lord onethousandninehundredand 74 and in the onehundredand 83rd year of the Commonwealth.
By the Governor (Secretary of State)

Baker Boy News, Indiana
July 11, 1974
New Member - We are happy to welcome the following bakery into membership in the Indiana Bakers Association. Juergen L. Jungbauer, Cafe Heidelberg, Indianapolis, Indiana.
Antiques wanted! The Cafe Heidelberg, Indianapolis, is not only a fine bakery, a place to get some good German food, luncheon style, also imported food to take home, but it is also a sort of a museum. All sorts of antiques cover the walls, floors and shelves of the sales room, Music Boxes, Beer Steins, Cuckoo clocks, pictures of well known people who they have served, including Pres. Nixon. The owner, Juergen L. Jungbauer, now wants to put in an old style bakery in an addition he plans to build -- not to bake but just for visitors, school children, etc. Mr. Jungbauer would like to have they front only of an old peel oven and any baking tools dating back to the early days of baking. If you have anything of this nature you would like to sell, write Mr. Jungbauer, Cafe Heidelberg, 7625 Pendleton Pike, Indianapolis, Indiana 46226.

Badische Neueste Nachrichten, Germany
Was man so hoert
Karlsruhe, June 1974

Ein Stueckchen Heimat bietet der aus Karlsruhe stammende Konditor Juergen Jungbauer (33) seit Jahren seinen deutsch-amerikanischen Landsleuten in der Millionenstadt Indianapolis. In seinem 1968 eingerichteten "Cafe Heidelberg" eroeffnete der agile Karlsruher ein Baeckerei-Museum, die Rekonstruktion einer Backstube der "alten Welt", wie sie vor etwa 80 Jahren in Deutschland charakteristisch war. Die oertliche Zeitung seiner neuen Heimatstadt widmete dem geschaeftstuechtigen Karlsruher kuerzlich einen bebilderten Artikel ueber sein Cafe. Und um "leichter mit dem Heimweh fertig zu werden" bieten der junge Unternehmer und seine Ehefrau Gabi, ausser gutem deutschen Kaffee, Torten und Pralinen auch noch - Hummel-Figuren, Lederhosen und bayerische Dirndl an. Denn Juergen Jungbauer weiss inzwischen genau, was Amerikaner lieben...

THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR
Auto show Cake
Saturday, December 29, 1973

Festivity reigned during the opening-day ceremonies at the 1974 Auto Show in the Exposition Building at the Indiana State Fairgrounds yesterday. Viewing the Tier cake which had a replica of a 1910 auto on top were (left to right) Howard Hauser, Chairman of the show; Tommy Tucker, president of the sponsoring Indianapolis Auto Trade Association, and guest Karen Rogers (picture), Miss Indiana, is cutting the large beautiful seven-tier wedding cake type that serves over 450 people. Juergen and Gaby Jungbauer, the owner of the Heidelberg Bakery, served the cake to the guests in their native German custom dresses.
The show began today with the cutting of a 60th anniversary cake with 60 candles and crowned with a car on top. It was baked by Juergen Jungbauer, national award-winning pastry chef.
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Badische Neueste Nachrichten, Karlsruhe, Germany
Der Postsack
Mittwoch, 15. August 1973

Ungewoehnliche Post erhielt die Redaktion gestern aus Amerika. Genauer: Aus Indianapolis im Staate Indiana. Von einem Karlsruher uebrigens. Der eine oder andere ahnt nun vielleicht schon, um wen es sich handeln koennte: Jawohl, um Juergen L. Jungbauer, dessen Name im Laufe der Jahre schon drei-, viermal durch unsere Zeitung ging. Statt den Beruf des Vaters, der in der Amalienstrasse eine Metzgerei betrieb, hat Sohn Juergen die suesse Seite des Handwerks gewaehlt, war Konditor geworden und schon im Jahre 1960, als Siebzehnjaehriger, in die Welt gezogen. Smutje auf der "Hanseatic", Chefkonditor in Sacramento, "Specialist" (Konditor) als Soldat und schliesslich Inhaber eines grossen Cafes in Indianapolis, in dem es u.a. solch koestliches Gebaeck wie original Karlsruher Springerle zu kaufen gab - das waren die hier berichteten Stationen des jetzt 30jaehrigen Juergen Jungbauer.
Sein Brief, richtiger: Sein Paket an die Redaktion, mit unzaehligen Briefmarken und einer Bescheinigung ueber eine Verzollungspostgebuehr in Hoehe von 2,30 DM auf der Stirnseite, enthielt freilich kein Jungbauersches Spezialgebeck. Es hat vielmehr damit zu tun, dass unser erfolgreicher Karlsruher seinem Cafe auch einen Laden angehaengt hat, in dem er so ziemlich alles verkauft, was man im taeglichen Leben so braucht, auch Zeitungen. Seit einigen Monaten auch deutsche Zeitungen bzw. Illustrierte. Es sind an die 40 "Stern" und "Quick" und "Spiegel", die allwoechentlich von Hamburg zu ihm auf die Reise gehen. Und jedsmal sind diese Zeitungen in das Behaeltnis verpackt, das Jungbauer nun in einem Karton aus Indianapolis nach Karlsruhe schickte.
Beweis und corpus delicti zugleich: Ein richtiger, grosser, schoener Postsack mit schwarz-rot-goldenen Biesen an beiden Laengsseiten und der Aufschrift "Deutsche Bundespost West" ist es, mit dem die Deutsche Bundespost unserem Karlsruher Amerikaner Woche fuer Woche seine Illustriertenpaeckchen schickt. Berechtigte Frage aus Amerika: Hat die Post soviel Geld, dass sie Zeitungspakete ins Ausland in erstklassigen Postsaecken verschickt, die jedoch Wegwerfware sind, weil sie niemand mehr haben will? Zusatsfrage aus "Karlsruhe: Darf Juergen Jungbauer die so eindeutig als Eigentum der Deutschen Bundespost deklarierten Saecke ueberhaupt behalten? Oder muss er sie sammeln und ueber den Grossen Teich zurueckbringen, wenn er mal wieder nach Karlsruhe kommt?
1 Picture Vor seiner "German Bakery" in Indianapolis zeigt Juergen Jungbauer einen der vielen deutschen Postsaecke, die er in den letzten Monaten erhielt. Im Hintergrund Jungbauers Cafe. Das es sich "Cafe Heidelberg" nennt, nicht aber "Cafe Karlsruhe" - wer will es ihm verdenken?

The Indianapolis Star
Friday, February 23, 1973

1,800 Whoop It Up For Governor At Premature Birthday Party
By: Robert P. Mooney

Governor Otis R. Bowen, who won't be 55 until next Monday, was given a premature birthday hoopla last night. governor Bowen and his wife cut the cake specially made by Juergen Jungbauer from the Heidelberg Haus Cafe and Bakery in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Exposition Magazine, Indianapolis, Indiana
Gourmet's Corner
Cafe Heidelberg
December 1972

By Maryhelen G. Correll
The festive holiday spirit... what makes it? Spicy aromas... froths of ribbons on specially wrapped surprises... myriads of sparkling baubles reflecting shimmering lights. Nostalgia for bygone Yuletides evoked by a familiar tune. People... wonderful people, aglow with love and friendship and warm feelings you can't explain.
You catch this spirit, this happy-heartedness, the minute you step into the old world atmosphere of the Cafe Heidelberg (7926 Pendleton Pike, Indianapolis). Surely it is the most unique pastry shop-coffee house in the Midwest, specializing in taste-tempting confections and conviviality. An odd combination in this busy workaday world.
Rollicking German music sets the mood for a delightful experience to which you'll want to return again and again. Feel like dancing? Do it. Once coupe was spied polishing off a perky polka right in the aisles between the macaroons and the spatzles.
Here 'midst a fast-growing collection of antiques... burnished copper kettles, coffee grinders, one-of-a-kind beer steins and a prized group of rare springerle cookie molds, some centuries old... reigns the jolly host, 29-year old Juergen Jungbauer (you pronounce the J like Y and roll the r's). His very blue eyes have an impish twinkle, and his boyish face is always wreathed in a Kris Kringle smile. Cafe Heidelberg was opened just three years ago and is as near an authentic European coffee house as you'll find in the U.S. Its intimate atmosphere reflects all the love and work put into it by a German-born, proudly American young man... just out of the Army and inspired by the hope that is the American dream. Customers come from miles around to pick up their regular orders for German breads, pastries and cookies as well as special orders for exquisitely decorated wedding cakes or commemorative plaques made completely of marzipan. They shop the gourmet foods section for such oddities as spiced octopus or the feather-light German wagers for special recipes.
Over Juergen's superb coffee, regular customers become close fiends as they exchange news and views. Already a tradition is the Wednesday afternoon "kaffee klatsch" that brings members of the German-American community together to share news form the "old country" and to pick up the latest German newspapers, magazines and "top forty" records. Teenagers bring their "pen pal" letters to J.J.'s petite wife, Gabi, for translation. Hoosiers planning their first European adventure take along carefully drawn maps to guide them to J.J.'s hometown, Karlsruhe, where his mother still lives.
You coffee may cool and your taste buds tingle a bit before you decide which to the moth-watering confections you'll squander your weeks's diet for... a cloud-soft lemon-piled meringue? Or a slice of gooseberry cheesecake? Hmmmm... maybe the almond crunch-topped torte. Ten layers, tightly pressed. Or perhaps the hazelnut butter cream? All taste tempting and sinfully rich.
At Cafe Heidelbeg, only one subject is "verboten". No one... but no one, talks about calories. What makes all these goodies to mmmmmmm-good is that J.J., trained as a pastry chef since he was 14 in Germany, uses only pure ingredients. Swiss and German chocolates. Sweet Wisconsin butter. Hard-to-get heavy whipping cream. No additives. No preservatives. You can tell the difference. "In this jet age, you can't fool anyone," says Juergen, realistically. "They probably had the same thing in Austria last weekend."
J.J. had already been recognized for his culinary art in Europe before he signed on to the SS Hanseatic of the Hamburg-American Steamship Line as a pastry chef in 1962. Once in the U.S., he had no trouble "following the seasons" at plush resort hotels from Arizona to Florida to the Bahamas, before he was drafted in 1966 (Aliens are subject to the U.S. draft, J.J. has since become an American citizen). "Best thing that ever happened to me... the draft," he confesses. Assigned to the mess hall at Fort Harrison, northeast of Indianapolis, he was quickly "discovered" and elevated from apple pie and KP duty, to the Officers' Club where his appe-teasing array of melt-in-the mouth cheesecakes were the highlights of Sunday night buffets until he was discharged in 1968, already well-known by Hoosiers.
The Army gave J.J. great opportunities to show his imaginative sweets to visiting generals and VIP's. When Indiana's Congressmen hosted "Indiana Day" in the nation's capital, J.J. and his masterpieces were flown there too boost Hoosier hospitality as senators and representatives reveled in a bountiful 60 ft. long table on taste treats. The walnut-paneled walls of his cafe are covered with citations, news clippings, autographed photos, including a very prized one of President Nixon - for whom J.J. baked when he was visiting Indianapolis in 1971. "I'm the only soldier who ever got the Army Commendation Medal for meritorious service wielding an egg beater,: he says, with a chuckle. He is especially proud to hold the first special award ever given by the Army Food Services. Between '66 and the cafe's opening, J.J. garnered first prize and Grand Champion Awards from every Indiana And Midwest Culinary Competition. You can see the huge trophies displayed behind the Christmas stollen and the Anise-plaetzchen, along with his associate membership on the American Olympic Culinary Team.
As much an artist as a chef, J.J. recalls an award-winning spun sugar creation... a 10-foot replica of the Eiffel Tower that took 300 hours of labor over a three-month period in '68. It required 90 pounds of sugar and 160 eggs... and took eight days to dry. Truly a masterpiece, it was on display in Indianapolis and Chicago for several months. J.J. likes to be whimsical with his captivating cartoon caricatures, made entirely of marzipan. A lifelike replica of a one-room school house, created for an Army general's retirement, featured a schoolmaster, unmistakably the general-turned-teacher, droning on as a schoolboy on the back seat snoozed. A barbershop quartet tickled funny bones of those who spotted one singer with a hole in his sole.
Customers wonder how J.J., with a pixie-life wife, and an infant daughter, Heidi, can keep up the pace he does... working 14 to 16 hours a day, giving pastry demonstrations to women's groups, doing TV and Radio talk shows, and talking to high school vocational classes. Luckily, he has a dependable right arm in Carl Zeieler, who does much of the production. J.J.'s secret? "Love what you're doing... and mix a little laughter in with the cookie dough." Which brings us to a point. Be alert when you're shopping for holiday goodies at the Heidelberg. Recently J.J. bolted through the kitchen door with a huge wedding cake which he asked a visitor to "hold for a minute". Spit seconds before the friend got a firm grip on the masterpiece, J.J. let go. The shocked friend went into orbit, and J.J. and the kitchen crew he had alerted beforehand rocked with laughter as it crashed to the floor. The fourfoot tiered cake was a fake.
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The Lawrence Journal
Cafe Heidelberg Features Award Winning Pastries
Jungbauer Is Master Pastry Chef
Thursday, June 15, 1972

Juergen Jungbauer, proprietor of the Cafe Heidelberg at 7625 Pendleton Pike, is our Business man of the Week for this issue. Mr. Jungbauer, a native of Karlsruhe, West Germany, is a Master Pastry Chef who has won many awards both nationally and internationally. When a customer walks into the Cafe Heidelberg, he is greeted with walls lined with various antiques and curios and by a pastry counter filled with scores of delectable goodies.
At any given time, a customer at the Cafe Heidelberg has his choice of over 200 fancy German pastries and breads. Many of these pastries have won blue ribbons for "Culinary Excellence" in International Competition. Juergen recalls one incident in which one of his masterpieces was entered in a competition in France, after winning a national award. The cake was duplicated for the international competition and packed for shipment, by air, to the European city where the competition was to be held. Things were fine until the package was opened, at its destination, and it was found that the beautiful creation had received such jostling that it was completely ruined.
The Cafe Heidelberg has been frequently visited by many notable politicians and celebrities, including United States Senator Birch Bayh and Indiana Governor Edgar Whitcomb. Jungbauer has also been asked to prepare pastries for President Richard Nixon on his visits to Indianapolis. Cafe Heidelberg's pastries have also been served in Washington, at several U.S. Senate functions.
When asked to describe his secrets to making such delicious treats, Jungbauer said, "Those are secrets, but part of our formula for success rests in the fact that we use no chemicals or synthetic additives and preservatives. Our food is more perishable, but if you want to make it good, this is the way." Jungbauer also attributed part of his success to his 'right hand man,' Karl Zeigler. "Karl has been with me from the start. He makes all of my German breads and hard rolls. He also works with the cakes, and is a fantastic asset to my business."
Juergen Jungbauer has been in the United States for seven years and comes to Lawrence courtesy of the U.S. Army and Fort Harrison. Juergen opened his bakery 3 1/2 years ago after his discharge from the Army, at Fort Harrison. He was married Saturday, June 10, so his friends in the Lawrence area can visit him at his shop and extend their congratulations.

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The Hoosier Farmer
International Pastry Chef Creates Gourmet Treats
April 1972
Only pure, fresh farm products will make the finest European pastries, commented an international pastry chef who now provides Hoosiers with is gourmet treats. "Fresh eggs, fresh unsalted butter, pure whipping cream, the right kind of wheat flour, an many, many hours of time and patience are needed to make our European pastries," says Juergen Jungbauer, a 27-year-old pastry chef from Karlsruhe, Germany. This talented young man began his career at the age of 14 in Germany, and in the past few years has been the pastry chef a well-known hotels and restaurants in Europe, New York, Vermont, Boston, San Francisco, Tucson, and finally located himself in northeastern Indianapolis. With a warm smile, twinkling eyes, and English with a German accent, he modestly will talk about his talent as a pastry chef.
"In Germany, at age 14 you are required to choose a vocation or trade," he tells. "I decided to go to pastry school but I never had my heart in the thing," he says. "My master was very determined or he would have given up on me. The first year I just played around and the second year I began to be a little more serious about it. Luckily, I ended up at the top of the class." The young Jungbauer explains, that in Germany you go to school for three days and you work for three days in a food establishment. " You consider it a privilege to work in a fine restaurant,: he says. " The better the place the less they pay you." Jungbauer said his first year he received $6.00 a month... but noted things get better as he made $12.00 a month his third year.
"Once you are out of school, it is customary in Germany to move every six months or a year in order to gain more knowledge about the pastry business. In America you would be considered a 'drifter.'"
In commenting on the eating habits of Europeans and Americans, Jungbauer said too often American diets lack imagination and tended to be just ... "meat and potatoes." Being a pastry chef is a unique position, and such a chef would prepare nothing but fine pastries... no other foods. Juergen Jungbauer said there were more than 120 different cakes that were popular in Germany and several hundred pastries. "The variety of pastries you can create is so great, there is no limit," he continues. "In the United States, the typical cake is made with two layers and one or two kinds of frosting. In Europe we have five layers, often alternating the kind of cake, and many different flavor combinations. We change the filling and change the cake butter."
When customers describe his cakes or pastries as "Melting in your mouth," they are quite accurate. "The melting point of the ingredients used affect the taste," he explains. The most common fillings are butter cream, which is a stiff vanilla pudding mixed with unsalted butter; whipped cream; and egg whites mixed with sugar and butter. Our type icing is used only on wedding cakes. "Follow a recipe exactly," says Jungbauer, "to insure a tender, light cake. Get a good basic, simple recipe and use it often. All recipes should go by weight and be measured in grams." "If you don't have a good cake recipe you can be sure of, it's better to use a cake mix and make it better," he added. "It sometimes takes 10 to 12 hours to create some European pastries. If you aren't careful, much time, labor, and wasted materials can result. This young pastry chef has received many awards and honors for his scrumptious creations. One wall in the unique German pastry shop is covered with clippings about the young baker and his wares. There's a picture of him with a 6 foot pastry Eiffel Tower he created. In another picture he's delivering a cake via cherry picker through an upstairs double size window because it was too big to go through the door. He's shown with his beautiful ice carvings, and with many confectionery creations complete with minute details.
Another wall is decorated with autographed pictures of many celebrities and political leaders who have tasted and enjoyed his creative concoctions. As a matter of fact, the entire German pastry shop is a story in itself. Jungbauer collects antiques, particularly those connected with the food industry, and has them artistically arranged throughout the shop.
Old coffee grinders, an old heating stove, European cookie presses, hand carved rolling pins, bundt pans, historical cookbooks, measuring devices, and hundreds of other fascinating items add a warm, quaint atmosphere to the shop. German music and pretty little waitresses dressed in German costumes make you think you have just walked into a bit of the "old world." Cake by the slice is the way you buy German pastries. And because there are so many different varieties, you may not be able to get the same kind each time you visit the shop.
"I select a pastry just because it looks good," said one customer who is an all-American meat and potatoes man. "You know I'm not a gourmet, and, to be honest, I'm never really sure what flavors are in these things," he said pointing to a multilayered pastry. "But whatever flavor they are, they're delicious!"
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Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis
March 17, 1972

Gourmet Pastry Baking class at IUPUI
Indianapolis, Ind.-German pastry chef Juergen Jungbauer will instruct a one-day Gourmet Pastry Baking and Decorating class at IUPUI 38th Street Campus on Tuesday, April 11.
Jungbauer, who was selected to prepare the sweet table and cake decoration for President Nixon's visit to Indianapolis in 1970, also prepared a 24-foot long pastry table in the U.S. Senate Office in Washington, D.C. in 1968 for a special Senatorial party.
The award-winning chef will demonstrate pastry baking techniques in the morning session and decorating techniques in the afternoon session. Enrollees will sample all the products. So that individual instruction can be given in the decorating session, enrollment will be limited.
The morning session is from 9:30 a.m. to 12 noon, and the afternoon session is from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Classes will be held in the food service laboratory in the Krannert Building. The $18 course fee includes parking and course materials.
An associate member of the winning American Culinary Olympics team, Jungbauer baked and decorated the three cakes taken to Germany for the event. Since 1968, he has won a number of awards, including the Indiana Restaurant Association's Grand Award in Culinary Arts, the Grand Award and Gold Medal plus four first prizes in "Concept in Food" Culinary Arts Festival in Chicago and the Grand Merit Award, Culinary Arts Festival in Cincinnati.

Konditorei und Cafe
Die Fachzeitschrift fuer den fortschrittlichen Konditor

Ein Konditor in Amerika
Cafe Heidelberg in Indianapolis ein "Schlager"

5. Februar 1972
Karlsruhe. Der Karlsruher Konditormeister Juergen L. Jungbauer, der vor einigen Jahren nach Amerika ging, hat in Indianapolis ein grosses Cafe unter dem Namen "Heidelberg" eroeffnet: Deutsche Torten, Gebaeck und Spezialitaeten gehen wie die warmen Semmeln im Haus des 28jaehrigen. Das Cafe Heidelberg entstand aus dem Umbau einer alten Baeckerei. Jungbauer dekorierte es "antik" und seine europaeischen und vor allem deutschen Spezialitaeten begannen sich schnell herumzusprechen. Jungbauer praesentiert ueber hundert Sorten verschiedener Leckereien und Kuchen. Der Karlsruher Konditormeister ist Sohn eines Metzgermeisters: Der verstorbene Vater fuehrte seinen Meisterbetrieb in Karlsruhe Ecke Amalienstrasse/Douglasstrasse, wo auch heute noch die Mutter lebt. Die Hoffnung, dass der Sohn eines Tages nach Karlsruhe zurueckkehren wuerde, ist mit der Eroeffnung des Cafe Heidelberg gering geworden.
Juergen Jungbauer endeckte die Vorliebe der Amerikaner fuer europaeische und deutsche Suessigkeiten und Backwaren waehrend seiner Dienstzeit bei der US-Armee, wo er mehr mit dem Spritzbeutel als mit dem Gewehr zu tun hatte. Der junge Karlsruher Meister packte tuechtig zu und auch heute ist sein Arbeitstag bis 18 Stunden lang: Er hat es geschafft, aber sein Geschaeft ist von Montag bis Samstag von 9.00 bis 21.00 Uhr und Sonntags von 11.00 bis 20.00 Uhr geoeffnet und braucht staendig den Meister, wenn es halten soll, was es heute verspricht. Dieses persoenliche Engagement fordert dem Meister viel ab, aber Juergen Jungbauer und sein Cafe Heidelberg sowie sein grosses Angebot sind zugleich auch eine besondere Visitenkarte des deutschen Handwerks in Amerika.

Badische Neueste Nachrichten, Karlsruhe, Germany
"Cafe Heidelberg" - bekannt fuer deutsche Torten / Ein Karlsruher blieb drueben...
Donnerstag, 9. Dezember 1971

Wieder einmal werden in vielen Karlsruher Haushaltungen die Utensilien fuer die Gutsele-Baeckerei hervorgeholt und vielleicht erinnert sich der eine oder andere dabei an einen jungen Karlsruher, Juergen L. Jungbauer, der drueben in Amerika als Konditormeister sein Glueck machte und das nicht zuletzt mit "Springerlen", dem charakteristischen Weihnachtsgebaeck der alten Heimat. Denn aus mancher Karlsruher Haushaltung ging damals ein "Modele" hinueber nach Arizona, nachdem die BNN im Namen des tuechtigen Burschen darum gebeten hatten. Als wir das letzte Mal ueber Juergen Jungbauer berichteten, im Sommer 68, hatte er gerade seine Militaerdienstzeit hinter sich und Mama Jungbauer hoffte, dass ihr Juergen nun endgueltig nach Hause zurueckkehren werde, in die heimatlichen Gefilde in der Amalienstrasse, Ecke Douglasstrasse, wo sein verstorbener Vater frueher eine Metzgerei fuehrte.
Nun erreichte uns aber ueber seine ehemalige Lehrerin, mit der er freundliche Briefe wechselt, die Nachricht das er inzwischen ein grosses Cafe namens "Heidelberg" im europaeischen Stil in Indianapolis betreibt. Dort hatte er als beliebter Konditor seine Militaerzeit ueberstanden - mehr mit dem Spritzbeutel als mit dem Gewehr - und viele Freunde gewonnen. Darum beschloss er, in diesem Land suedlich des Michigansees seine Zelte aufzuschlagen. Mit Hilfe eines kleinen Kredits kaufte er eine alte Baeckerei, arbeitete bis zu 18 Stunden am Tag, um sie hoechst eigenhaendig auszubauen, "antik" zu dekorieren und daneben schon seine Spezialitaeten herzustellen und zu verkaufen: Torten, Kuchen, Gebaeck. Bald sprach es sich herum, dass es im Cafe Heidelberg die kontinaentalen suessen Leckereien, die Petits-fours und Meringuen gibt, ueber 100 Sorten!
Wer die Vorliebe der Amerikaner fuer europaeische Suessigkeiten kennt, kann sich ausmalen, welcher Erfolg dem tuechtigen Karlsruher beschieden war. Allerdings wundern sich seine neuen Landsleute manchesmals, dass es bei ihm kein Brot oder Broetchen zu kaufen gibt, denn dass Konditor und Baecker in Deutschland nicht dassselbe ist, wissen die wenigsten. Ein Stueck Torte fuer 50 bis 80 Cents finden sie auch nicht gerade billig, aber nach dem ersten Bissen sind sie meistens von der Preiswuerdigkeit ueberzeugt, denn Jungbauer verwendet auch drueben nur beste Zutaten, wie er es hier gelernt hat.
Als ihn drueben einmal jemand fragte, ob er wohl eines Tages sein Cafe wieder augeben wuerde, um zurueckzukehren, meinte er: "Sicher werde ich eines Tages fuer ein Jahr zurueckkommen um Vergleiche ziehen zu koennen. Aber ich glaube, dass ich dann endgueltig in Amerika bleibe, denn es ist das einzige Land, in dem man noch immer so gross werden kann wie man will, wenn man nur hart genug arbeitet!" Und wie stark sich der heute 28jaehrige Karlsruher fuer sein eigenes Unternehmen engagiert, geht aus einem winzigen Vermerk auf seiner Geschaeftskarte hervor: Geoeffnet von Montag bis Samstag 9 bis 9 Uhr und Sonntags 11 bis 8 Uhr!
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The Suburban and Lawrence Journal
Jungbauer Is Old Country Pastry Chef
Thursday, August 12, 1971
By Norm Shortridge
The President of the United States has sampled his wares. So have scores of foreign dignitaries. He has been invited to the Senate of the United States. Not bad for a 28-year-old German-born pastry chef who has never baked bread in his life.
Juergen Jungbauer is the owner of the Cafe Heidelberg at 7625 Pendleton Pike. How he got there is a fascinating story. The Cafe Heidelberg is in reality a pastry shop and European-type coffee house. Along the paneled walls are displayed a variety of items: trophies and ribbons, antiques of all sorts, drinking steins, old cook books and a photo gallery of notable business and political personages Jungbauer has served. It is a unique blending of the old and the new.
Jungbauer was born at Karlsruhe, Germany, in the Black Forest area. At age 14 he enrolled in a business school to learn the food trade. He developed a flair for preparing pastries and decorative confectioneries and this became his specialty.
"It is different in Europe than here in the United States," he explains in accented English. "Over there people have a pride in and respect for vocational occupations.
"At 14 or younger, a boy goes to trade school to learn to become a cook or a baker or carpenter or mechanic. People look upt o him because he is learning a useful trade.
"That is why most of the well known chefs in this country are from Europe. They begin their training very young." After short stints as a pastry man in two German cafes, Jungbauer became a confectioner aboard the S.S. Hanseatic of the Hamburg American Lines. In 1963 a New Yorker, Carl Hoppl, sponsored Jungbauer's entry into the United States and he became pastry chef at Hoppl's Long Island restaurant and night club. Later he became pastry chef at the El Dorado Hotel in Sacramento, California, and the El Dorado Lodge in Tucson Arizona. In 1967 he was drafted into the army (aliens are subject to the draft after they have been in the country six months) and following basic training he was assigned to the Finance Center at Fort Benjamin Harrison.
Jungbauer went to the military authorities here and told them he was an experienced pastry chef. By a stroke of genius on someone's part (and most army veterans won't believe this) he was promptly assigned to the officers' club as pastry chef. He prepared a "sweet" table and cake decoration for President Nixon's visit to Indianapolis last year and provided pastries for the NATO Conference sessions earlier this year. Three years ago he prepared a 24 foot long pastry table for a special Senate gathering in Washington, D.C.
Jungbauer lived up to - and considerable enhanced - his reputation while at Fort Harrison, garnering a number of top awards in various culinary arts shows around the country. When he was discharged from the army in late 1968, he decided to stay in Indianapolis. "I had made so many friends here and the people at Harrison were so nice to me, I decided to take the plunge and open my own place," He says. With the help of a long-awaited loan from the Small Business Administration, he bought an old bakery along the Pike in Lawrence. "It was hard work at first. I was by myself and working 18 hours a day," he recalls. "I did everything from paneling the walls to mopping the floor. And baking on the side." But the hard work, quality products and good mouth-to-mouth advertising has paid off for Jungbauer. He has substantially paid back the loan. Business increased 30 percent last year over 1969," he declares. And there is obvious pride in his eyes when he says it.
Jungbauer estimates that about 20 percent of his business is wedding and party pastries, 20 percent imported food items and the remainder retail or "walk-in" trade. There are several display shelves of imported European food items: meats, crackers, pickles and the like. The glass display cases are filled with colorful and delicately decorated cakes, cookies, sweet rolls and meringues. Nearly 100 types of European cakes, or tortes, are baked and displayed interchangeably. Needless to say, the place smells heavenly.
But don't come to the Heidelberg and expect to get doughnuts, pies or much in the way of bread. "You've got to understand," he says, "that in the old country a pastry chef and a baker are not the same. They have been trained differently, I specialize in pastries. I would be foolish to try to offer a quality product in a specialty I am not trained to do." A strange philosophy to Americans, perhaps. But a refreshing one. Jungbauer sells his cakes whole or by the slice. And they are expensive. Depending on the kind of torte, a slice will cost between 50 and 80 cents. But, unless you are a glutton, you can't eat more than a slice at a time. The cake is indescribably delicious and feather light. And sinfully rich. Obviously, Jungbauer uses only quality ingredients; his special suppliers are located all over the country. Because he uses no chemical additives, his baked products won't keep as long as those from regular bakeries. He recommends that his pastries be kept refrigerated. He is meticulous about sanitation.
Jungbauer says Europeans won't come to this country to enter the pastry and bakery business. "In many ways, working conditions are better over there. There is not so much hurry. There is more time to do quality work." He had just recently returned from a two week trip back to his native land. "I try to get back once a year to see relatives. But, you know, I feel confined and shut-in back there. "We may have our problems over here but America still is the only place where you can be as big as you want to be if you plan and work hard enough!"
Amen.

Badische Neueste Nachrichten, Karlsruhe, Germany
"Cafe Heidelberg" - bekannt fuer deutsche Torten / Ein Karlsruher blieb drueben...
Mai 1971

Wieder einmal werden in vielen Karlsruher Haushaltungen die Utensilien fuer die Gutsele-Baeckerei hervorgeholt und vielleicht erinnert sich der eine oder andere dabei an einen jungen Karlsruher, Juergen L. Jungbauer, der drueben in Amerika als Konditormeister sein Glueck machte und das nicht zuletzt mit "Springerlen", dem charakteristischen Weihnachtsgebaeck der alten Heimat. Denn aus mancher Karlsruher Haushaltung ging damals ein "Modele" hinueber nach Arizona, nachdem die BNN im Namen des tuechtigen Burschen darum gebeten hatten. Als wir das letzte Mal ueber Juergen Jungbauer berichteten, im Sommer 68, hatte er gerade seine Militaerdienstzeit hinter sich und Mama Jungbauer hoffte, dass ihr Juergen nun endgueltig nach Hause zurueckkehren werde, in die heimatlichen Gefilde in der Amalienstrasse, Ecke Douglasstrasse, wo sein verstorbener Vater frueher eine Metzgerei fuehrte.
Nun erreichte uns aber ueber seine ehemalige Lehrerin, mit der er freundliche Briefe wechselt, die Nachricht das er inzwischen ein grosses Cafe namens "Heidelberg" im europaeischen Stil in Indianapolis betreibt. Dort hatte er als beliebter Konditor seine Militaerzeit ueberstanden - mehr mit dem Spritzbeutel als mit dem Gewehr - und viele Freunde gewonnen. Darum beschloss er, in diesem Land suedlich des Michigansees seine Zelte aufzuschlagen. Mit Hilfe eines kleinen Kredits kaufte er eine alte Baeckerei, arbeitete bis zu 18 Stunden am Tag, um sie hoechst eigenhaendig auszubauen, "antik" zu dekorieren und daneben schon seine Spezialitaeten herzustellen und zu verkaufen: Torten, Kuchen, Gebaeck. Bald sprach es sich herum, dass es im Cafe Heidelberg die kontinaentalen suessen Leckereien, die Petits-fours und Meringuen gibt, ueber 100 Sorten!
Wer die Vorliebe der Amerikaner fuer europaeische Suessigkeiten kennt, kann sich ausmalen, welcher Erfolg dem tuechtigen Karlsruher beschieden war. Allerdings wundern sich seine neuen Landsleute manchesmals, dass es bei ihm kein Brot oder Broetchen zu kaufen gibt, denn dass Konditor und Baecker in Deutschland nicht dassselbe ist, wissen die wenigsten. Ein Stueck Torte fuer 50 bis 80 Cents finden sie auch nicht gerade billig, aber nach dem ersten Bissen sind sie meistens von der Preiswuerdigkeit ueberzeugt, denn Jungbauer verwendet auch drueben nur beste Zutaten, wie er es hier gelernt hat.
Als ihn drueben einmal jemand fragte, ob er wohl eines Tages sein Cafe wieder augeben wuerde, um zurueckzukehren, meinte er: "Sicher werde ich eines Tages fuer ein Jahr zurueckkommen um Vergleiche ziehen zu koennen. Aber ich glaube, dass ich dann endgueltig in Amerika bleibe, denn es ist das einzige Land, in dem man noch immer so gross werden kann wie man will, wenn man nur hart genug arbeitet!" Und wie stark sich der heute 28jaehrige Karlsruher fuer sein eigenes Unternehmen engagiert, geht aus einem winzigen Vermerk auf seiner Geschaeftskarte hervor: Geoeffnet von Montag bis Samstag 9 bis 9 Uhr und Sonntags 11 bis 8 Uhr!
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Indianapolis Power & Light News
May 10, 1971

Cake Bake Winners
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UMMM GOOD! Judges for the final competition in the second annual Cake Baking Contest, sponsored by our Sales organization, follow the old axiom, "the proof of the pudding is in the eating," after screening the attractive cakes for texture, appearance, and the like. From left are Juergen Jungbauer, German pastry chef and owner of the Cafe Heidelberg; Mrs. Ann Harrington Wadelton, former food editor of The Indianapolis Star; and Mrs. Marjorie Zimmerman Ashby, director of Home Economics for Stokely-Van Camp, Inc.

Scottish Rite, Indiana
Ladies Party To Be Held
April 28, 1971 Pastry Chef On Program

Juergen Jungbauer, European pastry chef, and owner of the Cafe Heidelberg near Indianapolis (on the Pendleton Pike) will be the principal attraction at the next Scottish Rite Ladies party, which will be held in the auditorium Wednesday, April 28, starting at 7:30 p.m. The program will be held in the auditorium, with dessert being served later in the dining room. Mr. Jungbauer will demonstrate the art of making pastries and cakes and he will show slides of special assignments both in Europe and the United States. Reservations for the special program must be received by Monday, April 26. Mrs. William V. Sowers, general chairman, is requesting the co-operation of all ladies in contacting the widows of Fort Wayne Valley members.
No guests please admittance will be by ladies courtesy card doors open 6:30 p.m.

Fort Wayne News-Sentinel
German to Bake for Scottish Rite
Tuesday, April 20, 1971

The program for the Scottish Rite Ladies Party, April 28, will offer a double treat, with an entertaining talk and cooking demonstration by Juergen L. Jungbauer from cafe Heidelberg, Indianapolis, followed by a sampling of the chef's assortment of pastries. The program, arranged by chairman, Mrs. William V. Sowers, will begin at the Scottish Rite at 7:30 p.m. Doors will open at 6:30. Reservations must be made by Monday. Mrs. Sowers is being assisted by co-chairman, Mrs. Robert Miller.
Juergen Jungbauer, born in Karlsruhe, Germany, has won many awards internationally, some of which are pictured with him, below. He attended a business school for food trade, and a technical school in his native city, after which he was associated with Cafe Schwarz, there. Coming to America, Jungbauer served as the pastry chef in the Officer's Club, at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, before opening Cafe Heidelberg. Prior to that, he was pastry chef in clubs, lodges and hotels from coast to coast in the United States. Jungbauer has appeared previously in Fort Wayne, when he delighted the members of Decorative Living who heard him. The accomplished television personality also gave a demonstration on WANE TV at that time. He has taught at Purdue Regional Campus and for many cooking classes ranging from 20 to 1,000 people. Jungbauer prepared special marzipan art work and cakes for the U.S. Culinary Olympic Team for the 1968 international competition in Frankfurt, Germany.
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Muncie Evening Press, Indiana
Monday, March 22, 1971

Ruth Mauzy
What a taste treat awaits those who attend the luncheon showing of the annual Saks Fifth Avenue of Chicago style show to be sponsored April 1 at Green Hills Country Club by Women's League of the Muncie Symphony Orchestra. Dessert will be pastries created by the pastry chef of the Cafe Heidelberg in Indianapolis, to carry out the theme of the Women's League event, "Fashions Internationale.: The chef, who graduated in 1960 after studying since 1957 at Berufsschule fuer das Nahrungsgewerbe, a business school for the food trade at Karlsruhe, Germany, was affiliated with Konditorei-Cafe Schwarz at Karlsruhe. He has been pastry chef at the El Dorado Lodge in Tucson, the Hotel El Dorado in Sacramento, Calif., the private Town and Country Club in San Francisco, the lodge at Smuggler's Notch, Stowe, Vt., the Statler-Hilton Hotel in Boston and Carl Hoople's restaurant and night club in Baldwin, Long Island, N.Y. He won the Indiana Restaurant Association's grand award in culinary art, the gold award and gold medal plus four firsts in Concept in Foods in the National Culinary Art Festival at the Palmer House in Chicago, the Food Service Executive Association president's award and grand merit award in the Culinary Arts Festival in Cincinnati, and prepared a 24-foot pastry table in the U.S. Senate Office in Washington, D.C., in 1968 for a special senatorial party.
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Pastry Pizazz' Seen At Decorative Living
Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette
Thursday, November 19, 1970

By Anna Marie Horney
Juergen Jungbauer, a German pastry chef, presented "Pastry Pizazz" to the Fort Wayne Decorative Living series Wednesday at the Fort Wayne Art Institute as a demonstration of his skills.
"J.J.," as he is called, is the owner of the Cafe Heidelberg in Indianapolis where he strives to bring a bit of the "continent" to Americans. His shop is similar to European coffee houses and follows the style set by his European forefathers. He distinguishes the word "bakery" from "pastry" by saying, "bakery and pastry are tow different things. Pastry shops in Europe are called confectionary and we do not bake breads of any kind. The pastry chef and bakers are rivals."
"Pastry shops sell cake by the slice and the same cake is never seen twice. In this way, people buy slices of a variety of cakes. Americans stick to chocolate and cheese cake. Pastry chefs are ambitious to outdo the next one."
Jelly Cake
In the first of J.J.'s two cake demonstrations, he prepared a jelly roll cake. The jelly roll itself was filled with apricot jam and cut into thin slices to line the cake pan. After lining the pan tightly, slices of sponge cake were used to layer it, alternating layers being whopped cream. Thin slices such as this were achieved by setting the cake a distance up from the tabletop and taking a long sharp knife cutting through, holding the knife perfectly horizontal. Once the desired height of the cake was acquired, an apricot glaze was spread over the top and around the sides to keep the jelly roll from drying. The cake was finished off with regular cake glaze which sealed the pores of the cake and did not soak in to make the texture soggy. Toasted almonds were pressed against the sides and roses were demonstrated to add the final touches to the top.
German fruit cake was the next task for J.J. Made of a short pastry dough, the sponge cake was cut into tow layers with a French pudding as a filling in between. Fresh fruit such as bananas, peaches, grapes, cherries, apricots, and pineapple were used to decorate the top. Again apricot jam was used to prevent the fresh fruit from drying out, and the sides were covered with toasted almonds. Fruit provides eye appeal.
The speaker told the audience that in Germany the students only go to school for eight years before they decide what occupation they want to undertake. This would make the students 14 years old when choosing a profession. "By going out into the world you develop your own initiative and gain knowledge. If you learn an job in one place and don't move on, you never learn variety," he stated.
Talent Discovered
Since coming to the United States, this 27-year-old pastry artist has worked on both the East and West coasts. In his career he has used his skills in about 25 different places. He became a pastry chef in the army after they discovered his talent, but first he was assigned to finance school.
During his career he has displayed his work at culinary art shows and has won many trophies and blue ribbons. Color slides were shown of some of his masterpieces, one of which was a sugar structure of the Eiffel Tower. This particular work took approximately 400 hours. The blueprints for the structure were sent form California, after which a wooden model had to be made to use as an example. All of this entailed about four months of hard work.
1 Picture (Culinary Creations - Mrs. Arnold Huge and Juergen Jungbauer are pictured above with a sample of Mr. Jungbauer's pastry creations. He was the guest speaker for the Decorative Living series Wednesday at the Fort Wayne Art Institute.)
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Fort Wayne News-Sentinel Indiana
Decorative Living Program
Mouths Drool at J.J.'s Pastries
Wednesday, November 18, 1970

By Joan Wheatley (News-Sentinel Staff Writer)
He came to America because "I wanted to live here." He loves Americans - and do they ever love his pastries! Yum-m-mie! Lucky the Decorative Living members who got to sample the goodies after pastry chef Juergen Jungbauer prepared them during this morning's program at the Art Institute.
After studying in Karlsruhe and working in Europe, J.J. visited America while sailing as confectioner on the Hamburg-American Lien. He decided to come back. When he did, he found we think it strange for a man to change jobs frequently. Europeans thing it is more educational. We think bakers make bread, pies, cakes and cookies. Europeans fight for individuality of guilds. "I/ve never made a bread in my life," said the pastry chef as he deftly twirled a thick cake on the table, slicing it into very thin layers with knife parallel to table. We think a cafe is an old, rundown place. Europeans think it is a coffee house where they buy delicacies to sit and enjoy or take home. To all our odd reactions, J.J. said, "Nein-to heck with it," and went his own way, proving his point that we can support a coffee shop in Indianapolis, the Cafe Heidelberg; that we can be charmed by a pastry chef telling us a few tricks of his trade; that we can just look at exquisitely decorated pastries and have our mouth water. J.J. opened the program by demonstrating "how easy" it is to make a cherry roll. The flat cake was baked and rolled around apricot filling. This he sliced, lining a cake pan, bottom and sides. The center was filled with a creamed mixture - to replace the whipped cream he avoids using on stage. After it set, the whole was turned upside down and glazed, to seal the cake from a potential soggy consistency. Then it was decorated with sugar rose, stems and leaves, which the audience was not convinced would be as easily done at home. As he demonstrated, Chef Jungbauer talked about European conditoreis - of confectioneries - where one can spend 12 hours preparing a confection. It includes making fillings of chocolate or jam, preparing cakes, whipping cream, toasting almonds and cocoanut, glazing, coloring and squeezing out flowers, as well as baking.
A German fruit cake, J.J. declared, "is as easy as eins, zwei, drei." Made with 1 pound sugar, 2 pounds butter and 3 pounds flour, it is called the "1,2 3 cake." between layers, the chef added apricot jam and vanilla pudding. That was simple, it seemed. He made the decorative arrangement seem simple, too, giving away his trick of arranging the fruit on top. "Don't slice a banana, then pick up each piece and arrange," he said, illustrating a better technique. He cut a banana at a slant, quickly going chop, chop, chop. But he left a small portion next to the cutting board unsliced, carefully placed in his palm and gently flattened it, like a roll of pennies. The slices react like falling dominoes and presto! - they are in perfect formation for edging the cakes.
Bananas were used to top a cake to mark the portions, "In an European conditorei, don't think a slice is too small," he cautioned. They are very rich, "and that is why our women are fat... but we don't mind," he explained. Between the bananas he added cherries. A pineapple slice went onto the center. Tangerine sections surrounded it and other filled the spaces. All was glazed - with a jelly substance not easily duplicated and not used by Americans. It keeps fruit from darkening and adds a glisten. It protects the cake from excessive drying. It is a bond to hold the toasted cocoanut patted around the sides. It looks almost too good to eat.
Slides were shown demonstrating Juergen Jungbauer's abilities with marzipan and almond paste. An amazing one was the picture of a scale model Eifel Tower, taking years to plan and four months to make. He has created confectionery school rooms, complete with teacher and pupils, wedding cakes for 400 people, and a golf green with players and clubs. J.J.'s amusing talk and his confections are changing Americans' thinking. At the coffee, in the Art Museum, Decorative Living members sampled the wares. Reports are that the museum is covered with whipped cream and crumbs from the goodies. *

 

Fort Wayne News-Sentinel
Decorative To Taste Pastries, Talk By Chef Jurgen Jungbauer
Friday November 13, 1970

"Berufsschule fuer das Nahrungsgewerbe" is a large mouthful for Americans, not half as good as the pastries made by the s c h o o l's graduate, Juergen L. Jungbauer, who will give the Wednesday program for Decorative Living. The words indicate the German-born pastry chef has a degree from the business school for food trade. After hearing him speak at 9:30 a.m., at the auditorium of the Art Institute, Decorative members may judge for themselves the merits of taking the course, including mathematics and cooking, as they sample Chef Jungbauer's pastries served at the coffee in the Museum of Art.
He will bring the pastries from his Cafe Heidelberg, Indianapolis. The 27 year old naturalized American was born in Karlsruhe, Germany, and worked in Europe until 1963. He studied at a technical school in his native city, meanwhile taking the required practical training at a konditorei, Cafe Schwarz. Receiving his diploma, he became "pastryman" in Munich, in charge of confections, pralines and almond and sugar centerpieces at the Cafe Hans Brameschuber. He later became confectioner on the S.S. Hanseatic, of the Hamburg American Line.
Jungbauer started his life in the U.S. as pastry chef in a Long Island restaurant, continuing as assistant and chef in Boston, Vermont, California and Arizona hotels, lodges and country clubs. In the Army, he was sergeant in charge of the Officers Club's pastries at Ft. Benjamin Harrison. The chef has demonstrated his culinary skill and decorating abilities on T.V., appearing on "Around the Town," and elsewhere, including a show on WANE. He gives illustrated programs to civic groups, women's organizations, school classes, home economic teachers and restaurant managers. He has also taught pastry and cake classes at Purdue University, Indianapolis and Fort Wayne and at the Blueflame Cooking School, Terre Haute. His classes have had as many as 1,000 persons.
Jungbauer participated in the international competition in Frankfurt, Germany in 1968, preparing marzipan at work and cakes for the U.S. Culinary Olympic Team. Among the pastry chef's honors in the President's Award of the 1968 Food Service Executive Association and the Grand Award in Culinary Arts, '67, of the Indiana Restaurant Association. He was selected to prepare the sweet table and cake decoration when Pres. Nixon visited Indianapolis last February and also had prepared a 24 foot pastry table for a special Senatorial Party in Washington, D.C.
Cafe Heidelberg is a bakery-coffee bar, an European type coffee house. The Pendleton Pike store has an old world atmosphere which attracts customers from as far as 80 miles away. Jungbauer fills orders for special pastries, specializing in European cakes and tortes. Coffee and lunch is served at a coffee bar or at round tables. It is considered a status symbol to have a wedding cake decorated by Juergen Jungbauer. The pastry chef will discuss making and decorating pastries. He is pictured putting the finishing touches on a 200 pound wedding cake.
The after-lecture coffee will be of particular interest as members of Decorative Living sample the Cafe Heidelberg pastries. Coffee hostesses are the Mmes. B.C. Hammer, John Hoog, Daniel Ungrodt and Allan Wasson. On the Hospitality committee are Mrs. James Lawson, Mrs. Joel Salon and Mrs. Jay Schumaker.
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Banner-Graphic, Greencastle, Indiana
Extension Homemakers Achievement Day
Friday, October 16, 1970

Two hundred twenty Homemakers and guests attended the annual Achievement Day of Extension Homemakers Clubs on Wednesday, October 14th at the 4-H Community Building. Mrs. William Perkins of Roachdale, county president of Putnam County's Extension Homemaker Council welcomed members and guests and told of the clubs' many achievements in 1970. Mrs. Jack Torr of Madison Township, first vice-president of the Council served as program chairman.
Highlighting the day's activities was a demonstration by Juergen Jungbauer, twenty-seven year old pastry chef from Indianapolis. The German born and trained young man operates a coffee-bar in Indianapolis, teaches gourmet cooking classes and caters special events. He entertained the audience of women and Home Economics classes from Greencastle High School with his skill and ability to create beautiful pastries and also with his humorous comments. His appearance was sponsored jointly by the Homemakers Council and the Indiana Gas Company.
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Fort Wayne Campus, Purdue University
Gourmet Cooking

October 1970
Join international award-winning master chefs for an adventure in the culinary art. Five accomplished guest chefs will share their top menu and preparation secrets with you. Topics will include the following: Hors de'oeuvre and Cocktail Buffet - Klaus Mitterhauser, principal chef, General Mills Inc., Minneapolis; Create Original Salads - Win Schuler, Win Schuler's Inc., Marshall, Michigan; Indonesian rizsttafel and accompaniments - R. Daniel, head chef, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, New York; Celebrated Dishes with Eggs, including tenderloin helder and crepes - Chef Hubert Schmieder, Spread Eagle Farms, Klingerstown, Pennsylvania; Desserts to Remember - Juergen Jungbauer, master pastry chef, Cafe Heidelberg, Indianapolis. Both men and women will enjoy the series which is climaxed by a bountiful seven course dinner. Enrollment should be made in advance. Class meets at Allen County Extension Office, 4001 Crescent Avenue
Mondays, 7:30 - 10:00 p.m., 6 weeks, Starting October 4, $30

Greencalste, Indiana
Friday, October 2, 1970
Prize-Winning Pastry Chef Featured At County Homemakers Achievement Day October 14

Putnam county Extension Homemakers are planning their Annual Achievement Day on Wednesday, October 14, at the 4-H Community building at the Putnam County Fairgrounds north of Greencastle on Ind. 43
A special feature of the afternoon will be a demonstration by Juergen L. Jungbauer of Indianapolis. Mr. Jungbauer is a German-trained pastry chef, who teaches classes on his unique culinary art. Awarded many prizes during his young career, he was selected to prepare the sweet table and cake decoration for President Nixon's visit to Indianapolis in the spring of this year. The morning session of the Achievement Day program will include entertainment by the County Choral Club and the Four Girl Kitchen Band. Recognition will be given to Honor Clubs and 100 percent members. Luncheon will be served at noon and all club members and guests should make reservations with club presidents or at the county Extension Office by October 8. Only 27 years old, Mr. Jungbauer is expected to present an interesting as well as educational demonstration during the afternoon program. His recent employment has included the position of pastry chef at the Fort Benjamin Harrison Officer's Club in Indianapolis, the El Dorado Lodge in Tucson, Arizona, and the private Town and Country Club in San Francisco. Mr. Jungbauer has demonstrated his skills in decoration and culinary art work eight different times on the Jim Gerard television show "Around the Town" in Indianapolis and was twice a guest on Carolyn Churchman's Radio "Breakfast at the marrot" morning show.
He has given countless demonstrations for civic groups, women's organizations, school classes, home economic teachers, restaurant managers and gave a winning demonstration at the Indiana Restaurant Association's Culinary Arts Show at the Indiana State Fairgrounds in 1968. Mr. Jungbauer also prepared several special marzipan art work and cakes for the U.S. Culinary Olympic Team to be taken to the International competition in Frankfurt, Germany, in the fall of 1968.
The committee planning the event includes Mrs. William Perkins, chairman; Mrs. jack Torr, Mrs. Roy Haddon and the Pleasant Gardeners Club; Mrs. Jerry Rowings and the Better Homes Club, Mrs. Alden Weber and the Brick Chapel Club and Mrs.. Edgar McGaughey and the Rustlers Club.
1 Picture (Juergen Jungbauer, prize-winnig pastry chef, will present a demonstration during the afternoon session of the Extension Homemakers annual Achievement Day October 14, at the community Building at the Putnam County Fairgrounds. The 27-year-old professional chef has an impressive background of awards to his credit.)

THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR
Luncheon To Be Part Of Food Exhibition
Wednesday, September 23, 1970

Women attending Indiana's Midwest Food Exhibition at the Indiana State Fairgrounds will be entertained by a champagne luncheon next Wednesday in the Quality Motel North. pastries will be made for the occasion by Jurgen Jungbauer, a past grand award winner in the Indiana Restaurant Association's culinary arts competition. (condensed)

Indianapolis State Fair
August 29, 1970, 11 a.m.
The Inside and Outside of Party Cakes
Juergen L. Jungbauer
German-trained Pastry Chef Juergen Jungbauer has developed a bakery-coffee bar in Indianapolis modeled along the lines of a European-type Coffee House. Customers receive French and German pastries via quick "in-and-out" service and come from 70 and 80 miles away to place orders for the special pastries. The 27-year-old chef was selected to prepare the sweet table and cake decoration for President Nixon's visit to Indianapolis this February. He has been interviewed on television and radio many times about his unique culinary art. *


Konditorei und Caf, Monthly German Pastry Check Magazine
Ein deutscher Konditor in den USA
15. August 1970

So manchen deutschen Konditor zog es in die Ferne, und nicht wenige haben in fremden Laendern der deutschen Konditorei zu grossem Ansehen verholfen. So fuehrt unser Leser Juergen L. Jungbauer in Indianapolis im Staate Indiana in den USA das "Cafe Heidelberg", ein "house of fine German pastries", also ein Haus feiner deutscher Konditoreiwaren. Daneben muss er sich natuerlich auch nach dem Geschmack seiner amerikanischen Kundschaft richten, zudem sein Betrieb auf Hochzeitskuchen und Schaustuecke fuer Veranstaltungen (party orders) spezialisiert ist. Damit auch unsere deutschen Leser sehen, was so verlangt wird, stellte uns Juergen L. Jungbauer zwei Aufnahmen von seinen Arbeiten zur Verfuegung.
Auf dem einen Bild ist er gerade dabei, einen Hochzeitskuchen fuer etwa 350 bis 400 Personen zusammenzusetzen. Der fertige Kuchen hat acht Lagen und ist 1,90 Meter hoch. Das sechste "Stockwerk" wird gerade aufgesetzt.
Der Pariser Eiffelturm auf dem anderen Bild wurde aus etwa 90 Pfund Staubzucker und Eiweissglasur hergestellt. Als Vorlage wurden alte Plaene benuetzt. Das 2,30 Meter hohe Schaustueck ist innen hohl; ueber 300 Arbeitsstunden wurden fuer seine Herstellung benoetigt.
2 Large Pictures

Columbus Republic Daily Newspaper
'JJ' Overwhelms with Skill, Calories
August, 1970

By Charlotte Sellers
You could see the calories piling up layer on layer... cake slices, pudding, jellies, fruits, nuts, icing... but even a weight-watcher's only thoughts would have been "What a way to go!"
Whipping up the high-calorie fantasies at Southside junior high school Monday night was Juergen L. Jungbauer, a 27-year-old German native who now operates his own German bakery in Indianapolis.
Using a wet knive to cut a jelly role into slices a quarter-inch thick, the expert baker pronounced his name for his listeners but then added, "Nobody can pronounce that so they call me JJ."
His listeners were personnel of Bartholomew Consolidated School cafeterias, along with their guests from within the school system. Mrs. William Baker, supervisor of food services for the School Corporation, said the Monday demonstration of how to put finishing touches on pastries was the last of a series of workshops taught by Mr. Jungbauer.
In the other workshops in the school kitchen, the pastry chef showed the cafeteria employees how to mix cakes from basic ingredients, adding his own little tricks.
Rummaging in his boxes of ingredients on tables behind him Monday night, Chef Jungbauer explained in his accented English that he has been in the United States six years. He served two years as pastry chef at Fort Benjamin Harrison officers' club in 1968 and 1969 and now operates his own shop, the Cafe Heidelberg.
At a business school for food trade in his native Karlsruhe, Germany, Mr. Jungbauer studied mathematics, bookkeeping, and technical and theoretical knowledge about pastries. At the same time he was taking courses in a technical school to learn "practical and decorative confection usage."
That usage came through in impressive style as the chef placed the jellyroll slices around the bottom and sides of a pan, stuffing the empty spots with smaller bits of the roll.
He sliced a cake the hard way (into quarter-inch slices from the top of the cake) and then placed the layer on top of the filling he already had spread over the jelly roll rings.
A filling of vanilla pudding was spread on top of the layer with another cake layer added on top of the pudding. When the layers reached the top of the vertical jelly roll rings, the baker put a sheet of metal on top, inverted the pan, removed the pan and the wax paper lining and... voila!
There it was, leaving the women watching "oohing" and "aahing." The pinwhirl stripes of the jellyroll formed a solid covering around the cake and pudding layers. Then little dots of whipped cream were centered in the outside circles. Around the bottom he spread some apricot jam and slapped crushed nut onto the jam for the finishing touch.
Cakes are sold slice by slice (the hard way) in European bakeshops and the customer picks out the layers of cakes he wants combined into the torte. The women gather for their brunches or tea and eat the pastries while they drink their coffee, Mr. Jungbauer explained.
With maddening ease the chef then went on to fashion frosting rosebud in seconds and dash out leaves and stems beside them on a cake top.
Noticing the low comments of admiration from his audience, the chef looked up in his half-bold, half-shy way and asserted that unless the roses were made just right, most of them looked like cabbage heads anyway.
"If nothing works out, you can call them carnations," he said. Humor was spread nearly as thick as frosting during the demonstration.
On his next cake Mr. Jungbauer added a covering of fruit on top of the last vanilla pudding layer. Banana slices, apricots, dark and light cherries, grapes, mandarin orange slices arranged in a symmetrical design were glazed with a special glaze to give them "more eye appeal"... and suddenly there was another completed cake.
But, the baker added sadly, cakes like that do not sell in his shop.
"Things in Europe are a little creamy... and fattening," Mr. Jungbauer said. "Cherry or apricot pie never would make it in Europe no matter how good they are.
"American tastes are different than European," he said. "The inexperienced persons who have not traveled are afraid to buy something different, afraid to try something because they don't know whether to start at the top or the bottom to eat."
Slides of other confections made by Mr. Jungbauer were shown after the demonstration. They included abstract art cake, all in white frosting, which Mr. Jungbauer baked for the recent opening of the Museum of Art in Indianapolis.
Also shown were an Eiffel tower cake several feet high, a circus cake with a different expression on each character's face, a carriage and horses confected of sugar and many others. Many were prize winners in art baking competitions.
The baker said he likes to put humor in his creations and considers himself an artist (his decorations bear witness for him). He specializes in art work in his shop, Cafe Heidelberg in Indianapolis, and never makes such boring things as pies or doughnuts. He also collects antiques connected with baking and displays them in his ship.
Calorie-caution thrown aside and forgotten, the women in the audience Monday looked over Mr. Jungbauer's handiwork in the school cafeteria, then selected several samples from among the dozens of the pastries. Calories, yes, but... what a way to go!

The Speedway Flyer Journal, Indianapolis
Gourmet Pastry Class
Thursday, May 7, 1970

The preparation of fine German pastries is an art and a tradition in some homes and a hystery in others. For those who would like to learn the tricks in creating these specialties, a non-credit course at the IUPUI 38th Street Campus has been scheduled to start May 5 and continue for three Tuesday evenings.
Mr. Juergen Jungbauer, who operates Cafe Heidelberg Coffee bar in Indianapolis, will instruct the course in the old world art of practical and decorative pastry making.
"Gourmet Pastry Preparations" will include demonstrations on the creation of cakes, pastries, puddings, tarts and various European pastry specialities. Mr. Jungbauer, who has won many international awards in his field, will prepare the desserts in class and have samples and recipes available for the enrollees. Enrollment in the course is limited to 30. The fee is $20. Picture

Indiana University - Purdue University at Indianapolis
Gourmet Pastry Preparation
May 1970

Fine German pastries are a tradition and a specialty of many gourmet cooks, not only at holiday time, but for special occasions throughout the tear.
In this continuing Education course, Mr. Juergen Jungbauer brings enrollees a wealth of international knowledge in the old world art of practical and decorative pastry preparation.
Mr. Jungbauer will demonstrate the creation of cakes, pastries, puddings, tarts, and various European pastry specialties. His clear and simplified instructions remove the mystery surrounding this preparation. For the hostess who is looking for new treats for her guests, the host who likes to concoct his own epicurean specialties in the kitchen and the housewife who enjoys creating tempting desserts for her own family and friends, this course will provide some interesting new ideas.
Mr. Jungbauer has won many international awards in his field. Following his discharge from the army in July, 1968, he opened Cafe Heidelberg, his own coffee bar and pastry shop. Picture

Indiana University - Purdue University at Indianapolis
Foods Classes - Spring 1970
Gourmet Pastry Preperation

In this new Continuing Education course, Mr. Juergen Jungbauer brings you a wealth of international knowledge in the old world art of practical and decorative pastry preperation. He will demonstrate the creation of cakes, pastries, puddings, tarts, and various European pastry specialties. His clear and simplified instructions remove the mystery surrounding this preparation. Mr. Jungbauer has won many international awards and plaques in his field. Following his discharge from the army in July, 1968, he opened Cafe Heidelberg, his won coffee bar and pastry shop.
April 6-20, 1970
3 Mondays
7-9 p.m.
$20

->->Food Service Executives Association, Inc.
April 1970
President's Message: Spring is here, and there are many activities that our Branch of F.S.E.A. participates in at his time of year. You should plan to take part in as many of these coming events as possible. First, our next meeting will be Tuesday, April 14th at the St. Pius X Council of the Knights of Columbus, 2100 E. 71st Street. Tom Benefiel will be our host for the evening, and Jurgen Jungbauer will be our speaker. Jurgen is a true German Konditor. He will speak, show slides, and demonstrate his artistry. He will also furnish the dessert for the evening.


The Suburban & Lawrence Journal
Jungbauer To Teach Pastry Course
Thursday, April 23, 1970

The preparation of fine German pastries is an art and a tradition in some homes and a mystery in others. For those who would like to learn the tricks in creating these specialties, a non-credit course at the IUPUI 38th Street Campus has been scheduled to start May 5 and continue for three Tuesday evenings. Mr. Juergen Jungbauer, who operates Cafe Heidelberg Coffee bar, 7625 Pendleton Pike, Lawrence, will instruct the course in the old world art of practical and decorative pastry making. "Gourmet Pastry Preparation" will include demonstrations on the creation of cakes, pastries, puddings, tarts and various European pastry specialties. Mr. Jungbauer, who has won many international awards in his field, will prepare the desserts in class and have samples and recipes available for the enrollees.
Enrollment in the course is limited to 30. The fee is $20. Details are available through the continuing education office of IUPUI 38th Street Campus, 1201 East 38th Street, or by calling 923-1321. Picture


The Indianapolis News
Don't Quote Me
Monday, April 6, 1970

by David Mannweiler
Juergen Jungbauer, who operates the Cafe Heidelberg Coffee Bar in Indianapolis, will offer a noncredit course in the old world art of practical and decorative pastry making at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis' 38th Street Campus, starting on May 5. A $20 fee will be charged for the course, which continues three Tuesday evenings.

Indianapolis Star
Tasty Tryout
Thursday, March 5, 1970

A pretzel preview was one of the fringe benefits enjoyed by members of the West Group of the Women's Symphony Committee this week. Tasting the wares of baker Juergen Jungbauer (right) who will bake pretzels on the spot at the group's Rathskeller Festival on the Mall at Lafayette Square Saturday night are Mrs. George F. DeFabis (left) and Mrs. Robert T. Simonson. The concert by and for the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra will begin at 9 o'clock on the mall.

Indianapolis Star News
Decorative To Taste Pastries, Talk By Chef
February 30, 1970

"Berufsschule fuer das Nahrungsgewerbe" is a large mouthful for Americans, not half as good as the pastries made by the school's graduate, Juergen L. Jungbauer, who will give the Wednesday program for Decorative Living. The words indicate the German-born pastry chef has a degree from the business school for food trade. After hearing him speak at 9:30 a.m. at the auditorium of the Art Institute, Decorative members may judge for themselves the merits of taking the course, including mathematics and cooking, as they sample Chef Jungbauer's pastries served at the coffee in the Museum of Art.
He will bring the pastries form his Cafe Heidelberg, Indianapolis. The 27 year old naturalized American was born in Karlsruhe, Germany, and worked in Europe until 1963. He studied at a technical school in his native city, meanwhile taking the required practical training at a Konditorei, Cafe Schwarz. Receiving his diploma, he became "pastryman" in Munich, in charge of confections, pralines and almond and sugar centerpieces at the Cafe Hans Brameschuber. He later became confectioner on the S.S. Hanseatic, of the Hamburg American Line. Jungbauer started his life in the U.S. as pastry chef in a Long Island restaurant, continuing as assistant and chef in Boston, Vermont, California and Arizona hotels, lodges and country clubs. In the Army, he was sergeant in charge of the Officers Club's pastries at Ft. Benjamin Harrison. The chef has demonstrated his culinary skill and decorating abilities on T.V., appearing on "Around the Town," and elsewhere, including a show on WANE. He gives illustrated programs t civic groups, women's organizations, school classes, home economic teachers and restaurant managers. He has also taught pastry and cake classes at Purdue University, Indianapolis and Fort Wayne and at the Blueflame Cooking School, Terre haute. His classes have had as many as 1,000 persons. Jungbauer participated in the international competition in Frankfurt, Germany in 1968, preparing marzipan art work and cakes for the U.S. Culinary Olympic Team.
Among the pastry chef's honors is the President's Award of the 1968 Food Service Executive Association and the Grand Award in Culinary Arts, '67, of the Indiana Restaurant Association. He was selected to prepare the sweet table and cake decoration when Pres. Nixon visited Indianapolis last February and also had prepared a 24 foot pastry table for a special Senatorial Party in Washington, D.C. Cafe Heidelberg is a bakery, coffee bar, an European type coffee house. The Pendleton Pike store has an old world atmosphere which attracts customers from as far as 80 miles away. Jungbauer fills orders for special pastries, specializing in European cakes and tortes. Coffee and lunch is served at a coffee bar or at round tables. It is considered a status symbol to have a wedding cake decorated by Juergen Jungbauer. The pastry chef will discuss making and decorating pastries. He is pictured putting the finishing touches on a 200 pound wedding cake. The after-lecture coffee will be of particular interest as members of Decorative Living sample the Cafe Heidelberg pastries. Coffee hostesses are the Mmes. B.C. Hammer, John Hoog, Daniel Ungrodt and Allan Wasson. On the Hospitality committee are Mrs. James Lawson, Mrs. Joel Salon and Mrs. Jay Schumaker.
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The Suburban & Lawrence Journal
The Cafe Heidelberg
Thursday, February 5, 1970

The people of Lawrence who have not yet visited the Cafe Heidelberg, Bakery& coffee Bar, located at 7625 Pendleton Pike in Indianapolis, have a surprise in store when they step into the immaculate display room and see such items as Delicately Decorated Pastries, Fruit Tartlets, Fragile Meringues, Assorted French Pastries, French Type Sweet Rolls, Dainty Cookies and a variety of Breads. Juergen L. Jungbauer, the justly proud owner of the Cafe Heidelberg, has brought to this area Fine German Pastries, which have received awards from both European and American Festivals. His "art Work in pastries" is beyond compare and he has a fine collection of trophies for his work with pastries. Mr. Jungbauer is ably assisted by Carl Ziegler, his Pastry Chef. The two lovely ladies who so pleasantly greet and serve you are Irma Colley and Ingrid Beckman, who are attractively attired in authentic German costumes. It is fast becoming a "status symbol" to consult with Juergen Jungbauer about Wedding Anniversary, Birthday Cakes or Centerpieces for any special occasion. A phone call to 547-1230 will assure you of the very finest in baking goodness. Call today! Picture

THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR
January 10, 1970?

1 Picture
A bit of This - Mrs. E. L. Smith, president of the Indianapolis chapter of Executives' Secretaries Inc., gets special service from chefs Juergen Jungbauer from the Heidelberg Bakery and Gift Shop (left) and Frank Mueller (right) at the special Firm Night held last evening at the Holiday Airport Inn and hosted by Citizens Gas and Coke Utility. (Star Photo).

 

Fort Wayne Sentinel, Indiana
Pastry Pizazz' Seen At Decorative Living
JAN 1970 ?

By Anna Marie Horney
Juergen Jungbauer, a German pastry chef, presented "Pastry Pizazz" to the Fort Wayne Decorative Living series Wednesday at the Fort Wayne Art Institute as a demonstration of his skills.
"J.J.," as he is called, is the owner of the Cafe Heidelberg in Indianapolis where he strives to bring a bit of the "continent" to Americans. His shop is similar to European coffee houses and follows the style set by his European forefathers. He distinguishes the word "bakery" from "pastry" by saying, "bakery and pastry are tow different things. Pastry shops in Europe are called cofectionary and we do not bake breads of any kind. The pastry chef and bakers are rivals."
"Pastry shops sell cake by the slice and the same cake is never seen twice. In this way, people buy slices of a variety of cakes. Americans stick to chocolate and cheese cake. Pastry chefs are ambitious to outdo the next one."
Jelly Cake
In the first of J.J.'s two cake demonstrations, he prepared a jelly roll cake. The jelly roll itself was filled with apricot jam and cut into thin slices to line the cake pan. After lining the pan tightly, slices of sponge cake were used to layer it, alternating layers being whopped cream. Thin slices such as this were achieved by setting the cake a distance up from the tabletop and taking a long sharp knife cutting through, holding the knife perfectly horizontal. Once the desired height of the cake was acquired, an apricot glaze was spread over the top and around the sides to keep the jelly roll from drying. The cake was finished off with regular cake glaze which sealed the pores of the cake and did not soak in to make the texture soggy. Toasted almonds were pressed against the sides and roses were demonstrated to add the final touches to the top.
German fruit cake was the next task for J.J. Made of a short pastry dough, the sponge cake was cut into tow layers with a French pudding as a filling in between. Fresh fruit such as bananas, peaches, grapes, cherries, apricots, and pineapple were used to decorate the top. Again apricot jam was used to prevent the fresh fruit from drying out, and the sides were covered with toasted almonds. Fruit provides eye appeal.
The speaker told the audience that in Germany the students only go to school for eight years before they decide what occupation they want to undertake. This would make the students 14 years old when choosing a profession. "By going out into the world you develop your own initiative and gain knowledge. If you learn an job in one place and don't move on, you never learn variety," he stated.
Talent Discovered
Since coming to the United States, this 27-year-old pastry artist has worked on both the East and West coasts. In his career he has used his skills in about 25 different places. He became a pastry chef in the army after they discovered his talent, but first he was assigned to finance school.
During his career he has displayed his work at culinary art shows and has won many trophies and blue ribbons. Color slides were shown of some of his masterpieces, one of which was a sugar structure of the Eiffel Tower. This particular work took approximately 400 hours. The blueprints for the structure were sent form California, after which a wooden model had to be made to use as an example. All of this entailed about four months of hard work.
1 Picture (Culinary Creations - Mrs. Arnold Huge and Juergen Jungbauer are pictured above with a sample of Mr. Jungbauer's pastry creations. He was the guest speaker for the Decorative Living series Wednesday at the Fort Wayne Art Institute.)
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THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR
Dinner Dances, Buffet, Highlight Weekend Fest

October 5, 1969
A black-tie dinner dance last night, celebrating the restoration of the Indianapolis City Market Internationale, was attended by (left to right) Mrs. Thomas J. Umpire, Robert F. Dawson, Mrs. David R. Jordan, Dr. Jordan and Miss Ingrid Beckmann, serving cake from the Heidelberg Bakery. Sponsors were the market and Christ Church Cathedral Concerts Guild.
1 Picture

 

Market To Market Ball
October 4, 1969

The Cathedral Concerts Guild of the historic church on the Circle is sponsoring the Ball in celebration of the restoration of the City Market International and to emphasize two important downtown locations, the City Market and Christ Church Cathedral. Since both are utilized by residents and visitors, both are indeed vital to the continuing resurgence of our downtown Indianapolis. Among the dozens of regular stand holders the Heidelberg Haus, located 7625 Pendleton Pike, provided delicious German coffee and over 60 assorted cakes and pastries. Chef Jungbauer and his colorful German native dressed employees provided an exiting flair to this great cultural evening.

Baking for Profit, National Bakers Magazine
From American Culinary Olympics to the Cafe Heidelberg
July-August, 1969

Juergen Jungbauer features fine German pastries in new Indianapolis Coffee Bar
Young, German-trained Juergen Jungbauer is planning to develop his bakery-coffee bar in Indianapolis along the lines of a European-type Coffee House. This means that customers will receive quick "in-and-out" service. And if anyone can pull this off successfully, it will be this 26-year-old pastry chef who received his discharge from the Army late last year. He has an impressive work record as a pastry chef and has already garnered a prize collection of trophies for his work with pastries.
As an associate member of the winning American Culinary Olympics team that included Edmund Gass, executive chef of the King Cole Restaurant and Hubert Schneider, executive chef, Airport Holiday Inn, Juergen baked and decorated the three cakes taken to Germany.
A partial listing of his credits reads as follows: Indiana Restaurant Association's Grand Award in Culinary Arts in 1967; Grand Award & Gold Medal in "Concept in Food" Culinary Arts Festival, Chicago, 1968; the Food Service Executive Association's president's Award and numerous plaques and ribbons in various categories in 1968; and the Grand Merit Award, Culinary Art Festival, Cincinnati, 1968. Vivian Pearson, TV personality, recently interviewed Jungbauer on her show in Greenfield, Indiana.
Old World Atmosphere
In remodeling the building at 7625 Pendleton Pike ( a former bakery), Juergen Jungbauer used a German-Bavarian theme that clearly defines the products and service now available. The change is something that he, himself, describes best. "When we opened our store, milk sales dropped from 900 to 100 quarts. In place of milk and bags of donuts, we're selling French and German pastries. Our clientele now includes individuals , organizations and businesses desiring the specialized services we are able to offer."
Customers come form 70 to 80 miles away to place orders for special pastries. In this respect, "word-of-mouth" advertising is working profitably for Jungbauer. He also uses 15-second spot announcements each week on Radio WFMS in Indianapolis... publicizing his products and service to a wide age range of potential customers.
Some sixty types of European cakes, or tortes, are baked and displayed interchangeably. Each tote cuts into 16-18 slices. This specialty sells by the cake or for 45-70 cents per slice. It may be consumed on the premises with a steaming cup of full-bodied coffee.
The display cases which extend down a good portion of the right wall and partially across the back wall are filled with colorfully and delicately decorated pastries. There are fruit tartlets, assorted French pastries, fragile meringues shaped like swans and a large display of dainty cookies. Something new to area customers, ice cream cups are packaged in clear plastic containers, shaped somewhat like champagne glasses. French-type sweet rolls and a variety of breads round out a day's offering. Very Gumittlich! Coffee and lunch trade is seated either at the round tables near the front or at the coffee bar located along the left wall at the rear. The tow very attractive sales ladies, Hildegard Essler and Ingrid Beckman, are dressed in German costumes. Besides handling pastry and coffee bar sales, they add a convincing note of authenticity to the European Coffee House concept.
As the coffee bar business develops, Juergen Jungbauer plans to offer cold plates reminiscent of those served in Europe. He will feature a variety of open face sandwiches, German potato salad and brats... this kind of fare.
Open display racks, set at an angle and, mid-way along the left wall, are stocked with a wide variety of imported foods.
Juergen is not depending solely on walk-in trade. He supplies restaurants and clubs with pastries and is working up a profitable party and wedding cake business. In fact, it's getting to be a "status symbol" to have a cake decorated by Juergen Jungbauer. He supplies Fort Harrison on a regular basis with orders of 300-400 pastries.
Everything about the Heidelberg Cafe appears to be authentic from the Whipped Cream on the tortes to the antique cookie molds (from Germany) on the walls.
For a young European-trained pastry chef, Juergen Jungbauer has a remarkable grasp to the American way of doing business. It's entirely possible that he has the format already developed for a future chain of European-type Coffee Houses that stand an excellent chance of catching on with the American public.
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Purdue University, Fort Wayne Campus
Gourmet Cooking
Spring 1969

An entirely new program offered in cooperation with the Food Service Executive Assn. covers the following areas: soups, consommes, potages, taught by master chef George Marchand, Detroit, Michigan. Cooking with wines, The Wine Institute of America. Hors d'oevres, canapes, buffet suggestions, Hubert Schmieder, executive chef, Holiday Inns. Sauces entree suggestions, Edmond Gass, executive chef, King Cole, Indianapolis. Desserts, pastries, marzipans, etc. Juergen Jungbauer, master pastry chef, Indianapolis. A gala dinner with five master chefs preparing and explaining various gourmet dishes will conclude the course. - 6 weeks.

Woman's Department Club Bulletin
Terre Haute, Indiana, March 1, 1969

On Friday, march 14 the Woman's Department club will enjoy an unique experience in the "Gourmet Touch", a program informing us of the ways to prepare French pastries, cakes, ice creams, and ice carvings. Plus this unusual demonstration will be the youth and experience of a very excellent chef, Mr. Juergen L. Junbauer. Mr. Jungbauer is from Karlsruhe, Germany, and very young at the age of twenty-five, to have made such a prominent place in his field of endeavor. He started his studies in a business school for food trade at the Berufsschule fuer das Nahrungsgewerbe in Karlsruhe in April 1957. During his studies of 1957-60, he also attended the Fachschule der Konditoren Innung, a technical school for practical and decorative usage and works, in conjunction with his training at the Cafe Schwartz. After graduation, he was pastry man at the Cafe Hans Brameschuber in Munich, Germany for one year, pastry man at Konditorei in Karlsruhe for six months, and as confectioner on the S.S. Hanseatic of the Hamburg American Lines for one year before starting his sojourn in the United States which ended with the Ownership of the Heidelberg Bakery Shop in Indianapolis. His experience in the States starts with Pastry chef Assistant for one year at the Statler Hilton Hotel in Boston, through Pastry Chef in four different areas in the country until he was Pastry Chef at Fort Benjamin Harrison's Officers Club in Indianapolis from October 1966 to July 1968, as a Sergeant in the U.S. Army. Mr. Jungbauer was in Terre Haute recently when he gave a demonstration for the cooking school. He was introduced to the school by Mr. Joseph Quinn, vice-president of the Gas Company.
1 Picture (Mary Seller, J.L. Jungbauer, Mary L. Hicks)
(Famous chef to entertain Music Department)

The Terre Haute Star
Pastry Chef To Appear at Cooking School
February 13, 1969

Pastry Chef, Juergen L. Jungbauer, of Karlsruhe, Germany, and now owner of Heidelberg Pastry Shoppe, Indianapolis, will appear on the stage of the Indiana Theatre, Thursday, during the Blue Flame Cooking School. He will prepare French pastries for which he is internationally famous.
Jungbauer has won many awards for his outstanding work in this field. A few of these include the Indiana Restaurant Association's Grand Award in Culinary Arts: Grand Award and Gold Medal in "Concept in Food;" Culinary Art Festival in Chicago; Grand Merit Award; Culinary Art Festival, Cincinnati, Ohio, and the Food Service Executive Association's President's Award.
Chef Jungbauer will make a guest appearance at the "Gourmets' Glamorous Gas Galaxy," Wednesday evening. This annual event is sponsored by the Terre Haute Gas Corporation.
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The Terre Haute Star, Indiana
Huge Crowd Flocks To Cooking School
by: Sally Proffit
February 10, 1969

Another capacity crowd is expected to attent the Thrusday morning session of the citywide Blue Flames Cooking School being cuducted in the beautiful redecorated Indiana Theater. This year as in the past, the Tribune Star Publishing Co. Inc., is presenting the cooking school that is co-sponsered by the Terre Haute Gas Corp.
By 8:30 a.m. Teusday moring the lobby of the theater was filled with men and women. Many more sanding in line outside, braving the snow and cold winds. In fact, it was typical "Cooking School Weather".
Thursday's session will be as rewarding as Wednesday's. Miss Sophie Kay will prepare elegant desserts that are quick and eas, including breads, vegetables and entrees, plus patio cooking. This is the second year Miss Sophie has been our hostess. She is a nationally known home economist and television personality.

Thursday's session of the city-wide Blue Flame Cooking School promises to match todays session. Pastry chef Juergen L. Jungbauer, who has recieved many outstanding awards, will prepare several of his international pastry recipes.

The Terre Haute Tribune Star Newspaper
February, 1969

The Tribune-Star takes pleasure in bringing you the annual "Blue Fame" cooking School . We wilsh to extend our thanks for your participation and hope you have expanded your knowledge of food preperation and budget streching ideas. The title this year is "Gas Cooking is for the Birds"
Welcome to the annual Blue Flame Cooking School. Your Terre Haute Gas Corporation hopes your visit will be a very pleasant and profitable one and we welcome your suggestions or constructive criticism directed toward enhancing the future of our school.
Sophie Kay, a nationally known home economist and television personality, has been a most welcome visitor in Hoosierland and will intrique you with some short cuts, some innovations and some plain everyday cooking ideas.
Juergen (J.J.) Jungbauer brings to you a wealth of international knowledge in the old world art of practical and decorative confection usage in producing pastries.
9 Heidelberg Haus Pastry Recipes Follow

INDIANA RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION
IRA Career Booth in the Junior Achievement Fair
February 2, 1969

IRA entered a "Careers in Food Service" booth in this year's Junior Achievement Fair for the purpose of determining if such Fairs would provide a feasible approach to interesting youth in careers in the Food Service Industry. IRA's 1967 Culinary Arts Grand Champion, Army SP/4 Jurgen Jungbauer, volunteered his weekend and his masterpiece model of the Eifel Tower. The booth was aimed at today's teenager and hit its mark. Huge hearts and brilliant carnations along with "mod" language posters helped attract many of the thousands of teenagers who attended the Fair.
Picture 1 text. Specialist Jungbauer obviously enjoys his "recruiting" job as he explains available scholarship programs to Anna Marie Ryan.
Picture 2 and 3 text. The Eifel Tower made of Marzipan drew more ooh's and aah's than any other exhibit. Teenagers like the idea that a career in food service lets them "create" as well as "meet and greet".

Air Force Times,
Army Times,
Navy Times

Master Chef Sculpts With Pastry
January 1, 1969

By Maryhelen Correll
A blue-eyed young pastry chef from Germany gave his career in the food world a boost while serving with the Army at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind. Juergen Jungbauer recently completed his assignment as an Sp5, sculpting confections for the Fort Harrison Officers Open Mess. How did the talented Jungbauer get in the U.S. Army in the first place? He was drafted. (Aliens must register if they stay longer than six months, and are then subject to the draft.) As a result of his success in making pastry at Fort Harrison, the master chef is considering setting up his own pastry business in Indianapolis.
Jungbauer has been on the pastry staffs of the Hilton and Statler hotels and several famous dude ranches and restaurants in the west. In April, expatriate Hoosiers in the nation's capital hosted a "Hoosier Festival of Foods" for friends of Indiana in the Senate Office Building. More than 500 people ooh-ed and ah-ed over Juergen's fabulous delicacies, which graced a 16 by 30-foot table. The pastry artist has also made special creations for Governor Nelson Rockefeller and Mrs. Arthur Goldberg, wife of the U.N. ambassador. Competing against top chefs in his field, he won the Grand Sweepstakes prize in two Indiana Culinary Art Festivals, and took most of the gold medals, plaques and trophies offered by the Executive Chefs Association of the American culinary Arts Festival at the Palmer House in Chicago. He considers his unique confectionary creations as art forms. "I see a picture and I sculpt it in sugar," he explained. An eight-foot sugar Eiffel Tower he created graces the entrance to the Air France Terminal in Chicago. He did extensive library research before making the scaled, perfectly balanced wooden model of the tower, which he covered with 90 pounds of powdered sugar and 160 egg whites. It took over 300 hours of work.
"I like to humanize figures by injecting a little humor into my work," he laughed, pointing to a hole in the bottom of the shoe of one of his caricatures of an Army officer. American cake mixes are a boon to the housewife, Jungbauer said, and he admitted they really are good. He prefers, however, to bake large-scale, the old-fashioned way, using pounds and quarts for measurements. He works mostly from a scrapbook of very old German recipes, many of them his grandmother's which he has updated. So that FAMILY readers can have fund in their kitchens and impress their neighbors at the next Kaffeeklatsch, Jungbauer has adapted some of his 200-year-old recipes for home use.
3 Pictures

The Indianapolis Star
Sunday,November 17, 1968
Epicurean Fest At Brodey's Saluted Even By Competitors
Condensed Story

The accolade of a restaurateur's restaurant fitted like a second skin over Brody's when it was selected as the site for the Epicurean Feast during the Indiana Restaurant Association's recent show and convention. The show at the Indiana State Fairgrounds was one of the finest and the fitting climax was the dinner at Brody's , 21st and Arlington.
Lake Country Red wine was served to make the beef taste even better, if that were possible and then the creations of pastry genius Juergon Jungbauer were presented, a delectable assortment of over 350 German pastries that caused every well meaning dieter to toss his good intentions out of the window. *

Fort Sheridan, Illinois
Brief Ceremony Marks Fifth Army Anniversary
Friday, September 13, 1968

A birthday party for the 25-year-old Fifth Army, complete with speeches, distinguished guests and a huge, two-layer cake, was held at the NNC club Monday. Juergen Jungbauer, a pastry chef at Fort Ben Harrison officers' open mess, presided over the cutting of the cake which he had spent six hours preparing. A map of the 13-state Fifth Army are made form cake icing and a replica of the Fort Sheridan tower constructed from sugar loaf decorated the cake.
1 Picture Anniversary cake - LTG. John H. Michaelis, commanding general Fifth Army, and CSM Farrell Graham, command sergeant major Fifth Army, cut the two-layer 25th Anniversary cake honoring the birthday of Fifth Army. SP5 Juergen L. Jungbauer, pastry chef from Fort Benjamin Harrison and creator of the cake, watches the cutting. The celebration was held in the Fort Sheridan Noncommissioned Officers' Open mess.

Fort Benjamin Harrison
Food Convention Winner Gets Commendation Medal
August 23, 1968

Army Specialist 5 Juergen Jungbauer, Fort Harrison's renowned pastry chef, was awarded the Army Commendation Medal Friday.
Colonel B. Lyle, Deputy Post Commander, made the presentation to Jungbauer who was separated from military service last week after serving two years. According to the accompanying citation Jungbauer distinguished himself by outstanding and exceptional achievements from September 4, 1966 to July 19, 1966, in capacity of pastry chef, Messing Division, Headquarters, Special Troops. His exceptional knowledge in the culinary arts coupled with his initiative, dedication and enthusiasm contributed significantly to the morale of the soldier, in providing tremendous improvement in pastry baking in the "Consolidated Mess."
Jungbauer was also presented a Certificate of Recognition, first of its kind ever given, by the U.S. Army Food Service Center, Chicago. It recognized his professionalism and culinary excellence at the Executive Chef's Association's "Concept in Food" 1968 Conventional at which Jungbauer took a majority of top awards. Picture


The Harrison Post
Unusual Army Jobs
August 23, 1968

The August issue of "Army Digest" features soldiers who are doing "unusual jobs." You'll no doubt recognize the fellow who is the subject of the artwork... Specialist 5 Juergen Jungbauer, former pastry chef at the Officers' Club. The magazine took a Fort photo and converted it to a painting for the eye-catcher.

 

North East Topics, Indianapolis
Pastry Chef leaves
Two Delicious Years End At Ft. Harrison
August 15, 1968

Ft. Benjamin Harrison - Army Specialist Five Juergen Jungbauer, Fort Harrison's renowned pastry chef, was awarded the Army Commendation Medal upon his separation from military service last week, after having served tow years. Colonel B.B. Lyle, Deputy Post Commander made the presentation, which cited Jungbauer for "outstanding and exceptional achievements from September 4, 1966 to July 19, 1968, in capacity of pastry chef, Messing Division, Headquarters, Special Troops. "His exceptional knowledge in the culinary arts, coupled with is initiative, dedication, and enthusiasm contributed significantly to the morale of the soldier, in providing tremendous improvement in pastry baking in the Consolidated Mess", the citation concluded.
Jungbauer was also presented a Certificate of Recognition, first of its kind ever to be given to the U.S. Army Food Service Center, Chicago. It recognized his professionalism and culinary excellence at the Executive Chef's Association's "Concept in Food" 1968 convention, at which he took a majority of top awards. Jungbauer left Saturday for a visit with his parents in Karlsruhe, Germany. He plans to return in three weeks to go into business for himself in this area.

Badische Neueste Nachrichten Karlsruhe, Germany
"Ich bin so richtig lebensfroh"/Oder: J.J.'s" ruhige Kugel in der US-Armee
August 14, 1968

Er ist ein Komoediant reinsten Wassers, dazu ein liebenswuerdiger Eulenspiegel, wie er im Buche steht, und ausserdem ein Fachmann par excellence als Konditor. Er heisst Juergen Jungbauer, stammt aus Karlsruhe und ist erst vor kurzem nach zweijaehrigem Militaerdienst in der US-Armee in seine Heimatstadt zurueckgekehrt. Was fuer ein Schelm er tatsaechlich ist, der sich nach bester Stabsgefreiten-Masche durchs nun einmal zu absolvierende Landserleben schlug - das erzaehlte er uns gestern. Voll freudiger Erinnerungen an diese amerikanische Landserzeit, die uebrigens fuer ihn aus genau acht Wochen militaerischer Grundausbildung und ansonsten 196 Wochen fleissigen und ueberaus erfolgreichen beruflichen Wirkens bestand.
Seine "Story" haben wir kuerzlich schon einmal skizziert - wie er nach vollendeter beruflicher Ausbildung in seiner Heimatstadt Karlsruhe "auf die Walz" durch erstklassige Hotels, schliesslich an Bord eines Dampfers ging, spaeter in die USA einwanderte und hier - weil Bundesrepublikaner in der NATO_Allianz nun einmal Verbuendete sind - eines Tages von der US-Army zum Militaerdienst eingezogen wurde. Etwas, was ihm zunaechst gar nicht in den Kram passte, was sich aber als sein grosses Glueckslos herausstellte. Denn kaum hatte er seine acht Wochen Grundausbildung auf den sandig-huegeligen Truppenuebungsplatz Fort Lewis im Staate Washington "abgerissen", machte er sich als gelernter Konditor bekannt - und wurde von Stund an zu einem "Specialist", auf dessen Kuenste kein Offiziersclub mehr verzichten mochte. "Nach der Grundausbildung habe ich meine Uniform noch genau fuenfmal angezogen - immer nur zur Befoerderung", grinste er vergnuegt, "ansonsten war ich ein freier Mann, dem keiner reinredete". Ein Soldat, der die Umsaetze seines Offiziersclubs derart ankurbelte, dass er woechentlich nebenbei 100 Dollar "machte"! Der - auch nebenbei - im Fernsehen der 500 000-Einwohnerstadt Indianapolis/Indiana kochte und seine Konditorkunst demonstrierte, der seinen amerikanischen zivilen Berufskollegen aus dem ganzen Kontinent bei Wettbewerben die Goldmedaillen vor der Nase wegschnappte und damit zum gefeierten Helden seiner Einheit wurde, dem man voellig freie Hand liess. Und: der kreuz und quer durch die Staaten geflogen wurde, im Washingtoner Capitol seine Konditorei-Kreationen fuer grosse Parties richtete, Autogramme von Praesident Johnson und Robert Kennedy, von Senatoren, Gouverneuren und hoechsten Generaelen sammelte und zum "Sunnyboy" der Armee wurde.
In den USA liebt man initiative, humorvolle Menschen und froehliches Laecheln, das zu Juergen Jungbauer, ueberall nur "J.J." nach seinen Initialen genannt, gehoert wie die Spritztuete zum Konditor. Dass er haarscharf richtig "lag", bewiesen die zahlreichen begeisterten Dankschreiben und Zeugnisse, die vielen Fotos und Zeitungsartikel, die er in einem dicken Folianten gesammet hat. Ihm, dem Selfmademan in der US-Armee, ist es gelungen aus dem unbeliebten, aber unvermeidlichen Militaerdienst einen Riesengewinn fuer sein Leben zu machen. Denn Juergen schickt sich nun an, das Geld, "das in Amerika auf der Strasse liegt", fleissig einzusammeln? Mitte Oktober eroeffnet er einen bereits gemieteten Laden in erstklassiger Lage in der Stadt Indianapolis, wo er gewissermassen bekannt wie ein "bunter Hund' und ausserordentlich beliebt ist. Nicht nur wegen seiner Konditoren-Kunst, sondern auch wegen seiner Liebenswuerdigkeit. Dass er obendrein noch ein pfiffiger Junge ist, der haargenau weiss, wie man Geschaefte macht - wer haette dafuer mehr Verstaendnis als die Amerikaner? Ende August fliegt er wieder hinueber, um alle Vorbereitungen fuer die Eroeffnung seines "Cafes Old Heidelberg" zu treffen. Wieviel Hochzeitspaerchen schon auf ihn warten, damit er ihnen einen grossen "Wedding -cake", einen turmhohen Hochzeitskuchen fuer die Kleinigkeit von 250 Dollar oder mehr (oder weniger) zaubert, kann man nur ahnen. Seine Kundschaft ist ihm jedenfalls sicher. Senator Vance Hartke von Indiana hat ihm bereits zugesagt, Ehrengast bei der Eroeffnung seines Cafes zu sein. Eine bessere Reklame kann er sich nicht wuenschen im publicity-bessessenen Amerika.
Im Moment ist Juergen Jungbauer noch auf der Jagd - nach alten Springerle-Formen aus Hoz, nach alten Kupferbackformen, um seinen neuen Landsleuten ein Stueck Old Germany auf buchstaeblich suesse Art beizubringen. An Backblechen, Tortenaufteilern, Pralinenausstechern und was sonst zu seiner Kunst gehoert, werden noch deutsche Herstellerfirmen profitieren. Ihre Erzeugnisse wird er mit hinueber nehmen nach Indianapolis.
"Ich bin so richtig lebensfroh", meinte Juergen Jungbauer gestern einmal in unserem Gespraech. Das kam so spontan und ungekuenstelt heraus wie es seine Art ist. Uebrigens genau die Art, um in den USA als tuechtiger Fachmann sein Glueck zu machen. Dass er das schaffen wird, steht ausser Frage. Picture

Army Digest
Unusual jobs
They add spice to army life
August 1968

Mention "American soldier," and the first thought that usually comes to mind is the infantryman in battle garb. But in today's complex Army environment, many men are needed to fill varied roles - not just in supply, training, transportation and communications but in virtually any type of job in nearly every field of endeavor. Here are some unusual jobs which add the spice of variety to Army life:
FRONTPAGE PICTURE features Spec. 5 Juergen Jungbauer

Food Executive
Baking for Profit, Front picture
July-August 1968

Grand Award winner at the Seventh Annual Culinary Arts Show held by the Indianapolis Branch was Specialist 5 Juergen Jungbauer, U.S. Army, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind. More than 2,000 attended the show. Shown above loaded down with his trophies, Jungbauer stands in front of his eight-foot spun sugar replica of the Eiffel Tower, one of the many pastry items that won him the awards. A German citizen who plans to leave the Army this summer, Jungbauer gathered another armload of trophies at the National Culinary Arts Festival in Chicago. (U.S. Army photo.)

Northern Illinois Gas Company
July-August 1968 - Front page picture

Cafe Heidelberg
Juergen Jungbauer brings Continental Coffee House to Indianapolis.

Department of Defense
United States Army School Center/Post Headquarters
News Release for Immediate Release
Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, July 15, 1968

A swoop and a flourish...and there's really nothing to it, claims Specialist 5 Juergen Jungbauer, Fort Harrison pastry chef who's artistic confections are conversation makers wherever they are served. Jungbauer learned his craft in German pastry guilds between age 8 and 16, has put his talents to work for him and the U.S. Army during his enlistment. Scores of trophies, medals and plaques have been won by him in various Illinois, Indiana and national culinary arts festivals. He will be out of the service soon and plans to set up his own business in Indianapolis, close to the Fort.
Us Army Photo)

Badische Neueste Nachrichten Karlsruhe, Germany
Davon kann der Landser dann nur traeumen
Wehrdienst mit dem Spritzbeutel
August, 14 1968

Karlsruher Konditor machte eine sagenhafte Karriere als amerikanischer Soldat
Seit genau 12 Tagen hat der 25jaehrige Karlsruher Juergen Jungbauer, seines Zeichens Konditor, hinter sich, was viele junge Deutsche seines Alters - ungern - noch vor sich haben: den Militaerdienst. Allerdings: Unser junger Karlsruher hat seine zwei Jahre Dienstzeit als amerikanischer Soldat in den USA "abgerissen", eine Verpflichtung, die fuer ihn zum groesssten beruflichen Gewinn wurde - und wahrscheinlich auch nur in den grosszuegigen Vereinigten Staate moeglich ist. Denn Juergen Jungbauer hat in diesen zwei Jahren, sieht man von der Grundausbildung ab, in erster Linie seinen Spritzbeutel geschwungen und kaum den Karabiner. Seit 1. Juli hat er - Dienstrang "Specialist 5" - die Uniform an den Nagel gehaengt und ist nun auf dem Weg heim zum Muetterlein, zu einem Besuch bei seinen Eltern, deren Karlsruher Metzgerei einen anerkann guten Namen hat. Juergen Jungbauer wird sehr wahrscheinlich wieder in die USA zurueckkehren, in den Staat Indiana, um dort ein eigenenes Geschaeft zu eroeffnen - eine "Goldgrube", wie er heimschrieb.
Wie Juergen Jungbauer auf der Sahne seines Berufs in die USA glitt? Als er ausgelernt hatte, zog es ihn begreiflicherweise in die Ferne, die einem Fachmann wie ihm sehr schnell Naehe sein kann. Ueber Cafes und Konditoreien von Rang in Karlsruhe und Muenchen kam er 1962 nach Hamburg. Vom festen Land auf das (selten schwankende) Deck des Musikdampfers "Hanseatic" war es nur ein kurzer Sprung. Auch hier wusste man den geschickten Konditor, Spezialist fuer franzoesiche Pasteten, Torten, Desserts und raffinierten Appetithaeppchen, zu schaetzen und machte ihn prompt zum zweiten Mann dieser Kuenste in der "Kombuese". Drueben, in New York - Manhattan, ging Juergen an Land. Dass kurz darauf eine geradezu sagenhafte Karriere fuer ihn begann, die ihn kreuz und quer durch viele der amerinischen Bundesstaaten und in weltberuehmte Hotels fuehrte - wen verwundert das? Nun, allzulange blieb Juergen nie. Nicht, weil es ihm nicht gefallen haette, sondern vielmehr, um moeglichst viel in seinem Fach zu lernen. Und: Um Onkel Sam's Army moeglichst lange zu entgehen. Als ihn, den Einwanderer, das Mobilisierungsbuero zum erstenmale einbestelle, konnte er sich gerade noch mit seinen angeblich mangelhaften englischen Sprachkenntnissen herausreden; man gewaehrte ihm ein Jahr sprachlicher Akklimatisation. Immer wieder aber schlug Juergen der Behoerde rechtzeitig ein Schnippchen und war schon im naechsten Hotel mit Spritzbeute, Fantasie und Eifer bei seiner geliebten Konditorenarbeit in einem anderen Bundesstaat. Dann aber erwischte "es" ihn doch - in Tuscon (Arizona) musste "Juergen nun wohl oder uebel doch einruecken, Alliierter, der er von Nationalitaet und NATO-Pakt wegen schliesslich ist. Freilich: Kaum war die Grundausbildung durchgestanden, mochte der Offiziersclub der Jeweiligen Kaserne der Konditor-Kuenste ihres "German" nicht entraten. Womit sich der Rest seiner Militaerdienstzeit dort abspiele, wo sie fuer einen Soldaten noch am annehmbarsten und nahrhaftesten ist: in der Kueche bzw. Baeckerei. Hier kletterte er, der Spezialist, schnell im Rang zum "Specialist 5" auf, was etwa dem Oberfeldwebel entspricht. Dass er als Soldat in zahllosen Wettbewerben auch mit zivilen Kollegen seiner Branche triumphierte, einen Preis nach dem anderen einheimste, schliesslich eigens in die Regierungshauptstadt Washington geflogen wurde, um hier im Kapitol fuer die "Indiana Society of Washington" das Entzuecken im Wehrdienst, die sicher ziemlich einmalig und nur in den fuer respektable Leistungen besonders aufgeschlossenen USA moeglich sein duerften. Sein Kommandeur in Fort Benjamin Harrison, Col. Beck, uebereichte Juergen zum Abschied vom Wehrdienst eine Ehrenurkunde, in der seine Verdienste besonders gewuerdigt werden und - wie es heisst - dazu beigetragen haetten. "Ansehen und Moral dieser Militaerbasis " sehr zu heben.
Nun hat Juergen den "Barras" hinter sich - und wird ihn selbst in allerbester Erinnerung behalten, was die meisten Eingezogenen seines Alters in aller Welt sicher nicht unbedingt behaupten werden. Mit einem dicken Buch voller neuer Rezepte und sich im Lob ueberschlagender Empfehlungen kehrt er in den naechsten Tagen zu einem Besuch seiner Eltern heim nach Karlsruhe. Was danach kommt? Nun, Mama Jungbauer hofft natuerlich, dass ihr so tuechtiger Sohn im Lande bleiben und sich redlich naehren moege. Aber Juergen wird wahrscheinlich doch wieder in die "Neue Welt" zurueckkehren und sich hier auf Dollarbasis eine Existenz aufbauen - wieder mit Spritzbeutel, Fantasie, Fleiss und seinem strahlenden Lachen, das ihm sicher manchen Weg geebnet hat.
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Fort Benjamin Harrison
Corralin' The News
July 26, 1968
By Maryhelen Correll

One of Fort Harrison's best goodwill emissaries Specialist 5 Juergen Jungbauer is now sporting color-gay civilian attire! He is out out the Army and looking forward to July 30 when he will fly home to Karlsruhe, Germany, to visit his parents and catch up on what is new in the pastry line in Europe. When he returns he plans to settle in Indianapolis, a decision everyone has hoped for. Juergen has been the incomparable pastry chef at the officers' Club for the past two years.
Right now he thinks his travel is something special... he booked him a flight consisting of Indiana University co-eds!

The Harrison Post, Indiana
Post Pastry Chef Wins 5 Out Of 6
June 7, 1968

Specialist 5 Juergen Jungbauer, Fort Harrison's pastry chef, has done it again... copped almost all the prizes in "Concept In Food", a national contest sponsored by the Executive Chefs Association of the American Culinary Arts Festival in Chicago's Palmer House last weekend.
There he won 5 out of 6 pastry categories, garnering trophies, plaques and gold medals he can't even describe.
The competition was open to all culinarians, hotels, restaurants, schools, Army-Navy-Air Force installations, institutions and food processors.
Jungbauer's 8 foot spun sugar Eiffel Tower caught the eye of Air France and is now gracing its Air France Building in Chicago.
Only last month Jungbauer took the President's Award, two gold "Augies" and numerous plaques and ribbons in various categories, of the 7th Annual culinary Arts Festival held at Glendale, April 27.
A German citizen, he will get out of military service this summer.
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Fort Sheridan, Illinois
Prize Pastries
May 31, 1968
A display of pastries and sugar creations sculpted by SP5 Juergen L. Jungbauer, pastry chef at the Fort Ben Harrison officers' club, recently won a grand prize in the Executive Chefs Association exhibit in Chicago. Specialist Jungbauer, winner of several such awards, also displayed a replica of the Eiffel Tower made of 90 pounds of powdered sugar and 260 egg whites.
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The Indianapolis Star
Art for the Stomach's Sake
Sunday, April 28, 1968

SP5 Juergen Jungbauer, an Army pastry chef at Fort Benjamin Harrison, displays awards he won at the seventh annual Culinary Arts Show held yesterday at Glendale Shopping Center. He won a major share of the show's prizes for his decorated French pastries and confections. The 8-foot-hight model of the Eiffel Tower made of sugar was just one of the decorations Jungbauer exhibited. The Indianapolis branch of the Food Service Executives Association sponsored the show. (United States Army Photo)

 


Fort Benjamin Harrison
Juergen Jungbauer, Fort pastry Chef, was really hobnobbing with the elite last week in Washington, D.C.
March 1, 1968

By Maryhelen Correll
Joining members of the Olympic Culinary Team, he was flown to the capital, along with trays and trays of fancy pastries created right here at Fort Harrison, to stage a "Hoosier Dinner" for the Indiana Society of Washington.
It was the first time that any state had flown in homecooked foods for a festival in the capital.
On hand to sample Indiana's bounty were Supreme Court.
Juergen had time to converse with White House chef who claims President Johnson is strictly a "steak and potatoes" man.
It was a great event for everyone and put Fort Harrison in the Washington lime light for awhile. *

Indianapolis Star
5 Chefs Feed 500 at Washington DC
Hoosiers Enjoy Colossal Banquet
Friday, February 16, 1968

Washington - Hoosier expatriates in the nation's capital had themselves a colossal eating bash Wednesday night when a cops of championship Hoosier chefs came to town. The fabulous gestatory event was sponsored by the Indiana Society of Washington with its vice-president, Senator Vance Hartke (D.Ind.), and Mrs. Hartke in charge of the arrangements. Some 500 displaced Hoosiers and a heavy attendance of local celebrities crowded into the Senate appropriations Committee chamber in the Senate Office Building for the party. The banquet was prepared under direction of Chef Hubert Schmieder of the holiday Airport Inn, Indianapolis, captain of the United States Olympic culinary team.
Assisting were Edmond Gass, executive chef of the King Cole Restaurant, Indianapolis, also a member of the Olympic team; Robert Justus, chef-manager of the Sarge Biltz Restaurant, Lafayette; Robert Butts, chef of the Holiday Inn South, Indianapolis, and SP4 Juergen Jungbauer, pastry chef at the Fort Benjamin Harrison Officers' Club. Their recipes featured rounds of beef from central Indiana, loin of Hoosier pork, breast of turkey casserole made of Dubois County foul. Pickles mellowed in southern Indiana oak barrels, open hearth bakery rolls and country biscuits and an array repast.
Elaborate decorations, using the Indiana state flag and displaying the five chefs' awards added to the color. Among the celebrities who joined the Hoosier for the huge meal were U.S. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas and Mrs. Douglas, Labor Secretary W. Willard Wirtz and Mrs. Wirtz, Housing Secretary Robert Weaver and Mrs. Weaver, Internal Revenue commissioner Sheldon F. Cohen and Mrs. Cohen, Undersecretary of the Treasury Joseph W. Barr and Mrs. Barr, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army Arthur Allen and Mrs. Allen and dozens of members of the Senate and their wives.
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The Harrison Post
Pastry Artist Kneads No Publicity
February 16, 1968

Specialist 4 Juergen Jungbauer, Fort Harrison's pastry chef, is in the news again this week.
The Indiana Restaurant Association has recognized him for giving his free time to help staff its "Career Booth" in the annual Junior Achievement Trade Fair, held last week in Indianapolis.
Juergen exhibited the 8-foot Eiffel Tower he made last fall for exhibition in the Culinary Arts Festival of the Midwest Restaurant Show. It, plus other unique pastry creations, won this talented artist the Sweepstakes Grand prize.
By participating in the Junior Achievement Fair, Juergen was able to talk to many hundreds of high school students, showing them that the U.S. Army recognizes and actively encourages the development of trades and skills of all sorts. He also had a fine opportunity to encourage interested youths to take up the skill which is "wide open" to the enthusiastic and talented of pastry making.
Trained through the apprenticeship system in his native Germany, Jungbauer, 24, regrets that more young people do not take up this "trade".
"There is a great need for this skill in the U.S. as well as any place in the world," he comments. "I would like to see schools set up here similar to the European system to train young people in food crafts."
Wrote Warren Spangle, Executive vice president of the Indiana Restaurant Association, in a letter accompanying Jungbauer's citation. "By such voluntary and active participation in community affairs as exemplified by Specialist Jungbauer, officers and men of Fort Benjamin Harrison, have become an integral part of the greater Indianapolis community.
Col. B.B. Beck, who made the restaurateurs' certificate of appreciation to Jungbauer, also added his personal commendations for the chef's accomplishments.
Juergen's delicacies can be sampled regularly at the Fort Harrison Officers' Club.

IRA Career Booth in the Junior Achievement Fair
February 2, 1968
IRA entered a 'Careers in Food Service" booth in this year's Junior Achievement Fair for the purpose of determining if such Fairs would provide a feasible approach to interesting youth in careers in the Food Service Industry. IRA's 1967 Culinary Arts Grand Champion, Army SP/4 Jurgen Jungbauer, volunteered his weekend and his masterpiece model of the Eiffel Tower. The booth was a long with "mod" language posters helped attract many of the teenagers who attended the Fair.
Specialist Jungbauer obviously enjoys his "recruiting" job as he explains available scholarship programs to Anna Marie Ryan.
The Eiffel Tower make of Marzipan drew more ooh's and aah's than any other exhibit. Teenagers like the idea that a career in food service lets them "create" as well as "meet and greet."
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The Indianapolis News
Army Chef Is Master Of Art In Food
Thursday, November 9, 1967

It's hard to imagine a more unlikely place for a master pastry chef to find an outlet for talents, but it's a mutually satisfactory arrangement for Specialist 4 Juergen Jungbauer and the Officers Open Mess at Fort Harrison.
Jungbauer is doing what he was trained for, he loves every minute of it and he's making a reputations as a pastry chef that my help him do what he wants to eight months hence, when he completes his tour of duty - that is, open his own business.
Meanwhile, he pleases the palates of visiting Army dignitaries and other important officials who have business at the fort.
Army, Navy and Marine personnel will have opportunity tomorrow to view a sample at the 7 p.m. Armed Services dinner in the Indiana Roof ballroom. From almond paste, he has re-created the Defense Department seal which will be on view at the speakers Table, signed with his trademark "JJ."
On display, in the little area he was given to work in, away from the kitchen, is a circus scene with children and animals cavorting. For this year's retirement party for Brig. Gen. L.B. Markey, the pastry chef created a cake depicting a schoolroom with desks, a schoolteacher, who really looked like Markey, and four pupils - one asleep at his desk. Gen. Markey now is teaching high school in New Bedford, PA.
"I like to inject a little humor in my work," he said. "Sometimes it's done with a hole in a suit - anything to humanize the figures."
JJ, a native of Karlsruhe, Germany, made his decision to become a pastry chef at age 14, the age when all young Germans have to choose a vocation. He completed the apprenticeship after three years, going to school three days a week and working three days under close supervision. He came to the U.S. four years ago.
The 24-year-old chef has a scrapbook full of recommendations. "Changing jobs frequently is a way of learning more about the food business," he said in explanation. He believes that the European apprenticeship program is a good one. "It gives a sense of responsibility and of pride in what one's doing," he said. "I remember when I was working on the SS Hanseatic (the German liner that burned in New York harbor), I worked under a pastry chef who would not serve anything if it wasn't perfect. I thought he was too strict and too hard, but now I realize how much I learned under him."
Several of the special pastries he has made for the Officers mess can be made at home. One, a 1-2-3-pastry dough, is:
Almond Knacker
1 part sugar
2 parts butter
3 parts flour
The amounts depend on the size of the pan being used. If one would use 1 cup sugar. 2 cups butter and 3 cups flour, then use 2 eggs. Cream sugar and butter; blend in flour and beaten eggs. Roll dough out as thin as possible and yet not too thin to transfer it to pan. Bake at 350 degrees until about half done.
Topping
Currant jelly, orange marmalade or any other with similar tartness
1/2 cup unbeaten egg whites
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 pound almonds, sliced
1 teaspoon rum flavoring
Dash vanilla
Cinnamon, as desired
Spread half-baked pastry dough with jelly or marmalade. Combine slightly beaten egg whites with sugar, almonds, vanilla, rum flavoring and cinnamon. Heat just to warmness, so that mixture has a milk soup-like consistency. Spread evenly over the jelly-topped pastry dough. Bake at 350 degrees until golden brown about 20 minutes.

The Harrison Post
Outstanding Entries Earn Top Honors For Jungbauer
October 20, 1967

Specialist 4 Juergen Jungbauer (center), pastry chef at the Fort Harrison Officers' Club, holds his trophy for taking top honors in the Culinary Arts Festival of the Indiana Restaurant Association October 12. Left to right are Hubert Schneider, Holiday Inn chef; Jungbauer, and Chief Warrant Officer George T_Hanlon, club officer at Fort Harrison. Jungbauer's entries included exquisitely decorated petits fours, a complete circus made of marzipan, sugar caricatures, and an 8 ft. Eiffel Tower built exactly to scale.
picture (U.S. Army Photo, F.T. Quitoni)

The Indianapolis Star
Army Chef Wins State Restaurateurs' Contest
By Mary Anne Butters
Friday, October 13, 1967

With yesterday's Culinary Arts Exhibit as a guide, the United States Army would be the best fed group in the state.
Not only was the grand prize at the annual exhibit, sponsored by the Indiana Restaurant Association, won by a chef at Fort Benjamin Harrison - another of the divisions was won by a culinary artist at the Army Finance Center.
The grand prize winner, described by the judges as "perfect," "excellent," "a great artist" and a "true discovery in our time," is SP4 Juergen Jungbauer, a 24-year-old native of Karlsruhe, West Germany.
SP4 Jungbauer, who is still a German citizen, exhibited a variety of pastries. Among them was a cake with a hand inlaid coating resembling a parquet floor. Among the tiny individually decorated pastries were several sculpted swans, made of meringue.
The boyish-looking pastry chef won with a display that took him more than 600 hours to prepare.
With the exception of a 7-foot sugar replica of the Eiffel Tower, detailed sugar plaques and a miniature candy circus, the hundreds of other pastries are served at Fort Harrison every week.
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WFBM Radio Show
October 12, 1967
Coffee at the Marott 9:30-10:30 a.m.

Carolyn Churchman broadcast live from the Marott Hotel. Her guest today is Juergen Jungbauer a local pastry chef/soldier from Fort Harrison. Other hourlong interviews will be with Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., Paul Newman and Pearl Bailey

Indianpolis Northside Topics
October 12, 1967
Fort Chef Enters Culinary Competition

Specialist Four Juergen Jungbauer, pastry chef at the Fort Harrison Officer's Club, has entered some of his pastry creations in the Culinary Arts Exibit of the Indiana Restaurant Show today at the Indiana State Fairgrounds.
Spec. Jungbauer's entries will compete in the French Pastry and Decorated Cakes categories. Judging will take place at 11 a.m. The exhibit is open to the public from 2 to 8 p.m. today.

Fort Benjamin Harrison
Local Soldier Vying For Culinary Prize
Friday, October 6, 1967

The Culinary Arts Exhibit of the Indiana Restaurant Show and convention which will be held at the Indiana State Fairgrounds next Thursday will hold special interest for fort Harrison personnel.
Specialist 4, Juergen Jungbauer, pastry chef at the Fort's Officers' Club, will have some of his artistic pastry creations competing for honors in the French Pastry and Decorated Cakes categories.
Judging of the competition will take place at 11 a.m., Thursday. The exhibit will be open to the public from 2 to 8 p.m., October 12.
Jungbauer has been invited to appear on Carolyn Churchman's "Coffee at the Marott" at 9:30 a.m., on WFBM radio next Wednesday.
Pictures

Hoosier Chef Magazine
First Place Winner
October 1967
Picture left to right: Casey Sinkledam, Kitchen's of Sara Lee, Joseph Jungbauer, Ft. Harrison's Officers' Club (1st Place Winner), Edmond Gass, King Cole Restaurant, George T. Hanlon, Ft. Harrison, Hubert Schmieder, Holiday Inns, Richard Mack, Six Flags Over Texas, as judges for the Midwest Show's Culinary Arts exhibition. The winner, Army Sp-4 Joseph Jungbauer, was hailed by Casey Sinkledam, Executive Chef for Kitchens of Sara Lee as a major "find" in the field of culinary arts. The American "Culinary Olympic" team was awarded citations by Stokely Van-Camp for their outstanding contributions to culinary excellence.
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THE HARRISON POST
Flag Day And Army 192nd Birthday Celebration Ceremony
Cake Cutting Ceremony Fort Benjamin Harris
Friday, June 23, 1967

1 Picture
(Left to right) Lieutenant Governor Robert L. Rock, Dr. Elvis J. Stahr, Jr., national president of the Association of the United States Army and president of Indiana University and Indianapolis Mayor John J. Barton Combine to cut the cake at the invitational reception. Observing the ceremony are (left to right) Pfc Juergen L. Jungbauer, baker for the Officers' Club, Brigadier General L.B. Markey, Commanding General of the Finance Center and Colonel E.B. Lyle, Deputy Post Commander

The Suburban & Lawrence Journal
Army Birthday, Flag Day Celebrated
June 22, 1967
By Odin Wright

Woman's Work
LTV. Go. Robert L. Rock, Dr. Elvis J. Star, jr., president of the National Association, U.S. Army, and president of Indiana University, and Brig. Gen. L. B. Markey, Commanding General of the U.S. ARmy Finance Center, wait for Mrs. Markey to serve them a piece of the handsomely decorated Army birth cake baked by our own pastry chef Juergen Jungbauer of the officer's club. Background left is Col. E. B. Lyle, Deputy Post Commander. Occasion was an invitational reception at the Fort Harrison Officers' Club June 14 to observe the Army's birthday and Flag day.
picture (US Army Photo by Pfc. Paul Ramsey)

Fort Benjamin Harrison News
Corralin' The News
Friday, December 23, 1966

By Maryhelen G. Correll
Nicest thing that happened to us this week was finding a box of Swiss chocolates on our desk all of a sudden. We tracked it down to Juergen Jungbauer, the highly talented pastry chef who is responsible for the intricate designs that enhance the beauty of many of the cakes and pastries which have been baked by the mess hall for special occasions lately.
Did you eat Thanksgiving dinner at the Consolidated Mess? If so you saw his cake-frosting replica of the Bible. Attended AGPERSCEN'S second anniversary? For that Juergen concocted the fancy ribbon-and-roses decorations on the delicious strawberry filled anniversary cake.
What's Private Jungbauer doing at Fort Harrison? He's on the job training along with about 499 other new soldiers.
A bit ironic, for Juergen is a master pastry chef well known not only in his own native Germany but also in the U.S.
He has been on the pastry staffs of the Hilton and Statler hotels and several famous dude ranches and restaurants in the west. He has decorated a lavish cake for Governor Rockefeller and was called upon to create his originals for a special convention in Massachusetts which was attended by the state's former Governor Peabody. Once a hotel chain flew him to Arizona to create a very special "orange delight" for a party given by Mrs. Goldberg, wife of the U.N. Ambassador. She had been served this specialty in South America and wanted it for her own party.
Juergen is 23 and comes from Karlsruhe, near the Black Forest. He has been in the U.S. only three years. How'd he get in the Army? He was drafted after being in the States two years. (Aliens must register if they stay longer than six months). He has now been in the Army about a year and thinks it's the greatest experience he has ever had.
"I love my job and I am thankful to be living in America. After all, I think about those guys in Vietnam," he said emotionally.
In Germany after 8th grade every student attends a trade school. For three years Juergen attended pastry school in his hometown, studying with master chefs three days and working in different restaurants as an apprentice for three days.
His first real job was a pastry chef on a ship. Since then he has visited dozens of countries and has probably seen more of the U.S. than most Americans.
Juergen considers his unique confectionery creations as art forms. "I see a picture and I sculpt it in sugar," he explained.
Once he created a masterful reproduction of the Eiffel Tower which was three months in the making and took 300 hours of labor. It used 90 lbs. Of powdered sugar and 160 eggs and took eight days to dry when assembled.
The creation was intended for an exhibition in San Francisco but was damaged in Transit and couldn't be readied in time to compete.
American ready-mixes are a boon to the housewife, Juergen observed, and he admits they really are good.
He prefers, however, to bake large scale, the old-fashioned way, using pounds and quarts for measurements. He has adapted many old family recipes, some 200 to 300 years old, to his everyday needs.
Juergen prepared a master piece of a cake for the 50th birthday party of the Boston police chief and carries his own ID as "honorary deputy sheriff of Boston, Mass." to prove it! 2 Pictures

Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana

November 18, 1966

Fort Harrison helped the Indianapolis Servicemen's Center celebrate its first anniversary last Friday by baking the birthday cake. Putting the finishing touches on the decorations is Private Juergen Jungbauer who is receiving on the job bakery training. Witnessing the handiwork are Sharron Stroud, president of the volunteer hostesses for the Servicemen's Center and Sp4 James Lindsay, Chief Baker for Fort Harrison. U.S. Army Photo, Spa4 Chuck Claytor

Columbus Republic Daily Newspaper
Demonstration on Baking at School
Friday, November 18, 1966

Mrs. William Bake, supervisor of food, services for the Bartholomew Consolidated schools, has announced the final baking demonstration in-service which will be held at Southside junior high school Monday. The demonstration will climax a series of workshops to enable cafeteria personnel to learn more about baking. Juergen L. Jungbauer, chef at the Cafe Heidelberg in Indianapolis, will give the demonstration.
Mr. Jungbauer is a native of Karlsruhe, Germany, whose formal training in baking has taken place in two different business and technical schools in Germany. He has been pastry chef at some of the leading restaurants in the United States since 1963. Among these are the Statler Hilton Hotel in Boston, Smuggler's Notch lodge at Stowe Vermont, Town and Country club in San Francisco, Hotel El Dorado in Sacramento, and the El Dorado lodge in Tucson, Ariz.
Attendance at the baking demonstration will be by invitation only. Members of the school community attending will include cafeteria managers and supervisors, cafeteria employees, principals' wives, administrators' wives, school board members' wives, home economic teachers and elementary school secretaries.
At the close of the demonstration guests will ample some of the products the chef has prepared.

BADISCHE PRESSE (Karlsruhe, Germany)
ca. 1966
"Suesse Karriere" eines jungen Briganten
Vom Smutjje auf der Hanseatic zum Chefkonditor in Sacramento

Vor fuenf Jahren verliess ein junger Karlsruher seine Heimatstadt. Die Lehrzeit bei einer einheimischen Konditorei lag hinter ihm, und so stand der Erfuellung seiner Traeume nichts mehr im Wege. Als kleiner Junge hatte Juergen Jungbauer den Kunden der elterlichen Metzgerei in der Amalienstrasse die bestellten Fleisch- und Wurstwaren ins Haus gebracht und manchen Groschen fuer sein Sparschwein dankbar entgegengenommen. Inzwischen war ihm die Vaterstadt zu klein geworden. Fernweh lautete die auch eute noch nicht ausgestorbene Diagnose, und als erste Station seines Weltenbummels schwebte ihm das Land der unbegrenzten Moeglichkeiten vor.
Die Zivilisation hatte zwar schon lange die abenteuerlichen Wege in die Welt gesperrt, die sich Altersgenossen mit aehnlichen Ambitionen in frueheren Jahrhunderten anboten, aber schliesslich gibt es auch heute noch Moeglichkeiten, sich den Wind der weiten Welt um die Nase when zu lassen. Juergen Jungbauer heuerte kurzerhand auf der hanseatic, einem Schiff der Hamburg-Amerika-Linie, an. Zunaechst konnter er allerdings nicht in seinem Fach als Konditor taetig werden und musste sich mit einem bescheidenen Posten in der Kueche des grossen Dampfers begnuegen. Das tat jedoch seiner Begeisterung keinen Abbruch. Er vertraute auf das Glueck, das dem Tuechtigen zur Seite steht. Die grosse Chance bot sich ihm dann auch bald in einer Party, die der Kapitaen der Hanseatic fuer 700 Passagiere gab. Als der zweite Konditor ausfiel, schlug Juergen Jungbauers Stunde. Die Frage einer passenden Tischdekoration war naemlich noch ungeklaert. Er meldete sich beim Chefkonditor und unterbreitete ihm den Vorschalg, die Tafel mit dem Muencner Kindl zu schmuecken. Dafuer sollten eine grosse und mehrere kleine Exemplare des Wahrzeichens der bayrischen Hauptstadt aus Zucker angefertigt werden. Ob der clevere junge Karlsruher zu diesem Zeitpunkt wohl bereits wusste, dass der Kapitaen aus Muenchen stammte? Sein reizender Vorschlag und die kgekonnte Ausfuehrung fand jedenfalls den ungeteilten Beifall des seefahrenden Bayern und Lohn blieb nicht aus. Bereits der Morgen nach der rausechenden Ballnacht sah Juergen Jungbauer in der Zahlmeisterei, wo er kurzerhand zum 2.Konditor der Hanseatic ernannt wurde. Gleichzeitig wurde sein Gehalt umdie betraechtliche Summe von 400 DM erhoeht.
Seine Treue zur christlichen Seefahrt und zum neuen Amt hielt jedoch nicht lange an. Neue Abenteuer lockten. Nach eineinhalb Jahren Ozean zog es ihn wieder an Land. New York hiess die naechste Station des nunmehr zwanzigjaehrigen Karlsruher Globetrotters. Auch die zweite Sprosse auf der Leiter zum grossen Erfolg war eine Party. Dass der Praesident der Vereinigten Staaten der naechste Auftraggeber sein sollte, haette er wohl in seinem kuehnsten Traeumen nicht gehofft.
John F. Kennedy gab eine Gesellschaft und bestellte dazu ein Marine-Abzeichen aus Zucker. Auch diese Probe seines Koennens bestand Juergen Jungbauer glaenzend. Die Gaeste des Praesidenten liessen es sich nicht nehmen, den jungen Konditor aus "Old Germany" persoenlich kennenzulernen. Tausende von Amerikanern erlebten seinen Triumpf am Bildschirm mit.
Als der Polizeipraesident von Boston seinen 50. Geburtstag feierte, erregte ein riesiger Sheriff-Sterrn aus Zucker die Bewundereung der Gaeste. Der Jubilar liess es nicht bei Dollars und Worten bewenden. Er hatte sich ein besonderes Zeichen seiner Anerkennung ausgedacht, ernannte den Kuenstler mit der weissen Muetze fuer fuenf Jahre zum Polizei-Sergeanten ehrenhalber und heftete ihm den Sheriff-Stern der Bostoner Bobbies eigenhaendig an die Brust. Selbstverstaendlich war der Titel auch mit einem Ehrensold verbunden.
Nach einen kurzen Urlaub in den Bergen wandte sich Juergen Jungbauer nach Westen. Kalifornien, das Land des Goldrausches, wurde seine neue Heimat. Im Hotel El Dorado in der Hauptstadt in Sacramento erwarb er sich als Chef-Konditor rasch die Anerkennung, die er seit seinem Abschied von Karlsruhe schon so oft gefunden hatte. Sein letztes und wohl groesstes Werk ist eine sechs Fuss hohe Nachbildung des Eiffelturm aus rosa Zucker, den er nach einigen Studien des Originals in 300stuendiger Arbeit nachbildete. 90 Pfund Puderzucker und 160 Eier wurden verarbeitet. Auch hier fand Juergen Jungbauer den begeisterten Applaus seiner Gaeste. Ganz Sacramento kennt den jungen Konditor. Verstaendlicherweise leidet er bei solchen Erfolgen nicht an Heimweh, und ob die "Suesse Karriere" des abenteuerlichen Briganten im Land der unbegrenzten Moeglichkeiten am "Tour Eiffel" zu Ende ist, erscheint zumindest zweifelhaft.
Picture text. Juergen Jungbauer beim Zusammensetzen seines Eiffelturms aus Puderzucker. In 300stuendiger Arbeitszeit schuf der jungeKonditor dieses neueste Werk seiner "suessen" Karriere.
1 Picture

The Culinarian
Tucson, Arizona
March 1966

Juergen Jungbauer
Juergen Jungbauer was chatting about his home town Karlsruhe near the Black Forest and his chosen trade which he took up after 8 years in school. Artistically inclined he was enthusiastic about the confectionery profession and went, as is usual in Europe, to a trade and technical school for the food trades for three years. Juergen says to accurately reproduce and decorate pieces in sugar such as the Eiffel tower one has to spend many hours in research and each piece has to be in perfect scale. Among other pieces Juergen has done was a birthday cake for 1200 for a Marine Corps celebration. Juergen is now at the El Dorado Lodge in Tucson, Arizona.

Spreckels Sugar Company News, California
Fourth Quarter 1965

SPRECKELS SUGAR, egg whites, a lucite skeleton, and a great deal of talent are the composite parts of this replica of the Eiffel Tower constructed by Juergen L. Jungbauer, pastry chef at the El Dorado Motel in Sacramento. Juergen, who received his training in pastry arts in Karlsruhe, Germany, has worked all over the United States. Other works of his included in this display are the basket of roses, and the small animal figures, all of which were made from Spreckels Sugar. The tower, made up of three separate pieces, weighs 150 pounds and stands eight feet tall.

 

 

The Sacramento Bee, California
Young Chef Makes 6 Foot Reproduction of Eiffel Tower
Tuesday Morning, October 13, 1965

By Katherine Kitchen
German-born Juergen Jungbauer, at 22 is well established as a pastry and confectionery chef. A display of the work he has created in decorating frosting and almond paste is on exhibit in The El Dorado Hotel.
"These art forms are fragile," explained Jungbauer, "And that is why a 'do not touch' has been placed beside the exhibit. If someone punches out a small piece at just the right place, they whole structure can collapse. Doing this kind of work is my special hobby and I always have something in the making."
Choose Career Early"In Germany," continued Jungbauer, "one chooses a trade or professional career after eight years of school. I went to a trade and technical school for the food trades under the confectioner's guild in my home town of Karlsruhe, a city near the Black Forest.""When the formal three year training period is over, the kitchens of clubs, restaurants and ships are the school rooms. There is always something new to learn and it is always interesting," Jungbauer added.
Hours of Research
In describing how he accurately created an intricate six-foot reproduction of the famous Eiffel Tower, Jungbauer said that first he spent many hours doing research in libraries. Then he made a wooden model in 12 pieces. Each piece had to be in prefect scale or the model would not be balanced. They fitted into the four sides of the base, the mid-base and the tall tower.
After the wooden models were made, he began the assembling and the decorating. There is reinforcement inside the tower which does not show. The tower was three months in the making and required about 300 hours of labor to complete.
Pastry Tubes Used The decorations were done with cloth and paper pastry tubes and metal trips of many sizes.The frosting required about 90 pounds of powdered sugar and 160 egg whites. After it was applied to the sections of the frame eight days were allowed for drying. Then the final assembling was accomplished.
This is not the largest piece of decorative art the talented young chef has done. He cited as two of his special occasion productions a six-foot wedding cake and a birthday cake for 1,200 for a Marine Corps celebration.
Roses Cause Comment
The realistic appearance of a basket of roses in the display has caused considerable comments. They look too natural that the first impulse is to touch them. The basket is woven of strands of almond paste. Each almond paste rose is shaped in varying degrees of bloom and the leaves are carefully placed. The stems are of different lengths so the arrangement looks as if a professional florist had created it.
The Tree Cake
His parket kuchen, freely translated form the German language means "tree cake." It is a special delicacy served at important functions in his native country. The famous baumkuchen dough, similar to our pancake batter, is its base. The batter is baked in a large shallow sheet cake pan only until done, but not overcooked. It must be soft.
After baking, it is spread with apricot jam and the cake is folded over and over. Weights are put on the cake for a few days so it can be compressed to the smallest possible size. The finale is the shiny clear glaze which reveals a pattern similar to a beautiful parquet floor.
Almond Paste Doll
Also shown is a small, pretty-faced doll, entirely hand made of almond paste and the same shiny glaze. She has an unusual hairdo made of chocolate strands. She tops a cake and her elaborate, billowing skirt is made of frosting.
Jungbauer lets himself go when he fashions whimsical animals for cake or table decorations. He says they make viewers laugh and guests like to take these home as favors.
This array of eye-catching examples of a professional confection's art will be on exhibition for one and possibly two more weeks.
2 Pictures

The Sacramento Bee California
Young Chef makes 6 Foot Reproduction of Eiffel Tower
Young Chef makes 6 Foot Reproduction of Eiffel Tower
A six-foot cake in the shape of the eiffel tower is on display in the lobby of Hotel El Dorado, the work of pastry chef Juergen Jungbauer.
Picture: Jungbauer completes the second of three sections comprising the unusual art form. 1 Picture
Picture: Jungbauer places the main tower on the second section. The tower was three months in the making and required 300 hours of labor.
Photos by Hampton Brady Jr., of KOVR-TY

 

The Sacramento Union, California
October 5, 1965

A six-foot cake in the shape of the Eiffel tower is on diplay in the lobby of Hotel El Dorado, the work of Pastry Chef Jurgen Jungbauer...




Hotel and Restaurant News
Stowe, VT - Smuggler's Notch Resort Report
July 4, 1964

An Epicurean Array
Buffet-time at the Lodge is always a gastronomic affair as can be seen from this photo of the buffet luncheon prepared for the VHMA. Viewing the fruits of their efforts, from the left are: Juergen Jungbauer, pastry chef; Michael Martinet, executive chef; general manager Ivor Petrak; Walter Werth, maitre d'; Tony Flory, saucier and Dietmar Heiss, garde manager.
1 Picture (At the Smuggler's Inn , Stowe, VT )

Hotel and Restaurant News
Boston, Massachusetts
March 28, 1964

They Helped Make It A Success
Surrounding a modernistic confectionery creation, are some of the Statler Hilton personnel who helped produce the Boston Escoffier dinner. From left to right: Frank Spagnole, night chef; Gennaro Catinella, sous chef; Vergilio Rech, visiting pastry chef; Vasil Karoli, executive chef; James F. Gaffney, executive steward; Alice O'Hara, food supervisor; Rainer Finke, pastry chef; and Juergen Jungbauer, assistant pastry chef.

On the Move / The Statler Hilton Hotel
Boston, Massachusetts March 1964

A. H. Zugger, General Manager
Delicious to taste and elegant to look at, are the pastries being created by our Bakery Shop -- newly staffed by two very handsome young men -- Chef Rainer Finke (left) and his assistant Juergen Jungbauer (right). Here they're receiving some helpful hints on lemon sponge pie from Vigiloio " (right), a master of his art, who is here from Pittsburgh lending his talent to our Pastry Department. Picture

 

------

150 Jahre New Yorker Staats-Zeitung
17./18. November 1984

Vergiss die deutsche Sprache nicht
Das Beste, was dir deine Ahnen
Vermachten, ist nicht Geld noch Gut,
Bedenk, dass deines Lebens Bahnen
Gezeichnet sind von deutschem Blut,
Drum halt es stets fuer deine Pflicht:
Vergiss die deutsche Sprache nicht.

Des deutschen Geistes Himmelshoehen,
Der deutschen Dichter Poesie,
Kultur und Kunst recht zu verstehen,
Das kannst du ohne Sprache nie.
Hab teil am deutschen Geisteslicht,
Vergiss die deutsche Sprache nicht.

Willst du im Leben vorwaertskommen,
Die Strasse des Erfolgs begehen,
Dann dient es dir zu Nutz und Frommen,
Wenn du zwei Sprachen wirst verstehen,
Schau drum der Wahrheit ins Gesicht,
Vergiss die deutsche Sprache nicht.

Du bist in diesem Land geboren,
Bist Buerger dieses Lands allein,
Du hast ihm bei der Fahn geschworen,
In leid und Freude treu zu sein,
Doch deines Ursprungs Stimme spricht:
Vergiss die deutsche Sprache nicht.

Vergiss sie nicht, die deutsche Sprache,
Die dir von Kindesbein vertraut,
Er ist die allerbeste Sache
Der vielgeliebte Mutterlaut.
Was in der Welt dich auch anficht:
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Nur Geliehen


Es ist alles nur geliehen,
hier auf dieser schoenen Welt,
es ist alles nur geliehen,
aller Reichtum, alles Geld,
es ist alles nur geliehen,
jede Stunde voller Glueck;
musst Du eines Tages gehen,
laesst Du alles hier zurueck.

Man sieht tausend schoene Dinge,
und man wuenscht sich dies und das,
nur was gut isst und was teuer
macht den Menschen sehr oft Spass.

Jeder moechte mehr besitzen,
zahlt er auch sehr viel dafuer,
keinem kann es etwas nuetzen,
es bliebt alles einmal hier.

Jeder hat oft das Bestreben,
etwas Besseres zu sein,
schafft und rafft das ganze Leben,
doch was bringt es ihm schon ein?

Alle Gueter dieser Erde,
die das Schicksal Dir verehrt,
sind Dir nur auf Zeit gegeben
und auf Dauer gar nichts wert.

Darum lebt doch Euer Leben,
freut Euch neu auf jeden Tag,
Wer weiss auf unserer Erdenkugel
was der Morgen bringen mag?

Freut Euch auch an kleinen Dingen,
nicht nur an Besitz und Geld,
es ist alles nur geliehen,
hier auf dieser schoenen Welt.